CBL @ PS Air Museum

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This was a Challenge Based Learning preso for Apple at CUE 2009 in Palm Springs, CA. The Digital Arts Technology Academy 10th graders and teachers worked with The Palm Springs Air Museum to learn about communication during WWII.

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  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • Can start with 33, then 34 then 32.
    And it turns out that after some work, we were able to develop a simple framework for Challenge Based Learning. It looks like this:

    You start with a big idea – water, energy, self-identity, justice, voting.
    Come up with the essential question: What does water mean to me and my community? Who am I and who do I want to become? Why is it important to vote?
    Then you frame the challenge: Improve your school’s use of water. Build your dream team for life. Implement a plan to get more 18 year olds to vote.

    Let’s focus for a moment on the big idea of water. We did some work on this in the summer of 2008. Atlanta was within 30 days of running out of water; Iowa was suffering from flooding; California was fighting fires; and the Gulf Coast was preparing for hurricane season.

    A quick sidenote: We’ve been fortunate to be able to involve Adam and Jamie from the “Mythbusters” on some of the communications around Challenge Based Learning and when we were brainstorming essential questions about water, Adam said: “What water means to you depends on whether your thirsty, dirty or on fire.”

    So if the challenge around water was to improve your school’s use of water, the teams need to ask themselves what they need to know about water before they can tackle that challenge?

    They will need to do some research; they may need to do a few activities such as measuring their school’s use of water today and so on. The important thing here is that students can do the work.

    Then the students can create an actionable solution and do it. Assessment can focus on how well the solution addresses the challenge and how well the kids executed the plan.
    Then you can publish – sample solutions and also publish the documentation –what was it like to work on this challenge

    We’re creating a lot of video to bring these ideas to life. Here is one on what it means to accept a challenge.
  • CBL @ PS Air Museum

    1. 1. Challenge Based Learning - Big Idea Essential Question The Challenge Guiding Questions Guiding Activities Guiding Resources Solution - Action Assessment Publishing - Student Samples Publishing - Student Reflection/documentation
    2. 2. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA Communication What was the human impact of WWII ? Collect | Create | Publish -Relevant Media The use of technology & communication Web Research Palm Springs Air Museum The role of Life Magazine Media Skill Building Web and iTunes U The role of comic books Docent Interviews 10th grade World History The meaning behind nose art Reflections on DAE Ning Standards Human experiences Image & Audio editing for stories Create and Publish Audio Slideshows ‘Industry’ Standards Publishing > DATA Websites Publishing > Team Reflections on DAE Ning
    3. 3. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Big Idea) Communication (Essential Question) What was the human impact of WWII ? (The Challenge) Collect | Create | Publish -Relevant Media
    4. 4. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Guiding Questions) The use of technology & communication The role of Life Magazine The role of comic books The meaning behind nose art Human experiences
    5. 5. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Guiding Activities) Web Research Media Skill Building Science of Flight lab Docent Interviews Reflections on DAE Ning Image & Audio editing > story
    6. 6. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Guiding Resources) Palm Springs Air Museum Web and iTunes U 10th grade World History Standards The Teachers
    7. 7. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Guiding Resources) Palm Springs Air Museum Web and iTunes U 10th grade World History Standards The Teachers  iTune s
    8. 8. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA (Publishing - Student Samples) (Publishing - Student Reflection/documentation) DATA Websites | Air on local media Team Reflection Videos on DAE
    9. 9. The Palm Springs Air Museum | DATA Communication What was the human impact of WWII ? Collect | Create | Publish -Relevant Media The use of technology & communication Web Research Palm Springs Air Museum The role of Life Magazine Media Skill Building Web and iTunes U The role of comic books Docent Interviews 10th grade World History The meaning behind nose art Reflections on DAE Ning Standards Human experiences Image & Audio editing for stories Create and Publish Audio Slideshows ‘Industry’ Standards Publishing > DATA Websites Publishing > Team Reflections on DAE Ning
    10. 10. -Started off as a collaborative opportunity to interview local veterans using still photography and audio recorders

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