CS101- Introduction to Computing- Lecture 38
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CS101- Introduction to Computing- Lecture 38

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Virtual University

Virtual University
Course CS101- Introduction to Computing
Lecture No 38
String Manipulations
Web development lecture 13

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CS101- Introduction to Computing- Lecture 38 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 1 CS101 Introduction to Computing Lecture 38String Manipulations (Web Development Lecture 13)
  • 2. 2 During the last lecture we discussed Mathematical Methods • We looked at the properties and methods of JavaScript’s Math object • We produced solutions for simple problems using several methods of the Math object
  • 3. 3 Problems & Solutions • JavaScript doesn’t support drawing of graphics • However, crude graphics can be put together with the help of various text characters or tables • One cannot write a character at a random location on the screen using JavaScript • Instead, the graph has to be drawn from top to bottom, one row at a time – just like when
  • 4. 4 Mathematical Functions in JavaScript • In addition to the simple arithmetic operations (e.g. +, *, etc.) JavaScript supports several advanced mathematical operations as well • Notationaly, these functions are accessed by referring to various methods of the Math object • Moreover, this object also contains several useful mathematical constants as its properties • This object has no use, but of a placeholder
  • 5. 5 Properties Math.PI Math.E Math.LN2 Math.LN10 Math.LOG2E Math.LOG10E Math.SQRT2 Math.SQRT1_2 Note the CAPITAL lettering of all properties
  • 6. 6 Methods random( ) sin( r ) cos( r ) tan( r ) asin( x ) acos( x ) atan( x ) atan2( x, y ) max( x, y ) max( x, y ) round( x ) floor( x ) ceil( x ) exp( x ) log( x ) abs( x ) sqrt( x ) pow( x, y )
  • 7. 7 sin( r ), cos( r ), tan( r ) Standard trigonometric functions Returns the sine, cosine or tangent of ‘r’, where ‘r’ is specified in radians EXAMPLE document.write( Math.cos( Math.PI / 4 ) ) 0.7071067811865476
  • 8. 8 asin( x ), acos( x ), atan( x ) Standard inverse-trigonometric functions Returns the arcsine, arccosine or arctangent of ‘r’ in radians EXAMPLE document.write( Math.asin( 1 ) ) 1.5707963267948965
  • 9. 9 Returns the square root of x sqrt( x ) 0.5 → 0.7071 Returns x raised to the power y pow( x, y ) 2, 32 → 4294967296
  • 10. 10 Returns Math.E raised to the power x exp( x ) 1 → 2.718281 Returns the the natural logarithm of x log( x ) Math.E → 1
  • 11. 11 ceil( x ) Returns integer nearest to x Returns largest integer that is less than or equal to x Returns smallest integer that is greater than or equal to x floor( x )round( x ) 1.1 → 1 12.5 → 13 -13.9 → -14 1.1 → 1 12.5 → 12 -13.9 → -14 1.1 → 2 12.5 → 13 -13.9 → -13
  • 12. 12 Returns the absolute value of x abs( x ) 1.1 → 1.1 -12.5 → 12.5 0 → 0
  • 13. 13 Returns the smaller of x and y min( x, y ) 2, 4 → 2 -12, -5 → -12 Returns the larger of x and y max( x, y ) 2, 4 → 4 -12, -5 → -5
  • 14. 14 random( ) Returns a randomly-selected, floating-point number between 0 and 1 EXAMPLE document.write( Math.random( ) ) 0.9601111965589273
  • 15. 15 random( ): Example Design a Web page that displays the result of the rolling of a 6-sided die on user command
  • 16. 16 Today’s Goal (String Manipulation) • To become familiar with methods used for manipulating strings • To become able to solve simple problems involving strings
  • 17. 17 String Manipulation Examples • Combine these words into a sentence i.e. take these strings and concatenate them into one • Break this string into smaller ones • Convert this string into upper case • See if a particular character exists in a string • Find the length of a string • Convert this string into a number
  • 18. 18 String Manipulation in JavaScript • In addition to the concatenation operator (+) JavaScript supports several advanced string operations as well • Notationaly, these functions are accessed by referring to various methods of the String object • Moreover, this object also contains the ‘length’ property
  • 19. 19 Example name = “BHOLA” ; document.write( “The length of the string ‘name’ is ”, name.length ) ; The length of the string ‘name’ is 5
  • 20. 20 Let us now revisit an example that we first discussed in the 18th lecture Let us see how we put the ‘length’ property of a string to good use
  • 21. 21
  • 22. 22 <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Send an eMail</TITLE> <SCRIPT> function checkForm( ) { … } </SCRIPT> </HEAD> <BODY bgcolor=“#FFFFCC”> <TABLE><FORM …>…</FORM></TABLE> </BODY> </HTML>
  • 23. 23 <TABLE> … <FORM …> <INPUT type=“submit” name=“sendEmail” value=“Send eMail” onMouseOver=“checkForm( )” > … </FORM> </TABLE>
  • 24. 24 function checkForm( ) { if( document.sendEmail.sender.value.length < 1 ) { window.alert( “Empty From field! Please correct” ) ; } } This is a string
  • 25. 25 Other Uses of the ‘length’ Property • To restrict the length of login name or password to specified bounds, i.e. no less than 4 and no more than 8 characters • ???
  • 26. 26 String Methods FORMAT string.methodName( ) EXAMPLE: name = “Bhola” ; document.write( name.toUpperCase( ) ) ; document.write( name.bold( ) ) ; BHOLABhola
  • 27. 27 Two Types of String Methods 1. HTML Shortcuts 2. All Others
  • 28. 28 String Methods: HTML Shortcuts bold( ) italics( ) strike( ) sub( ) sup( ) big( ) small( ) fontsize( n ) fixed( ) fontcolor( color ) link( URL )
  • 29. 29 big( ), small( ), fontsize( n ) person = "Bhola" ; document.write( person ) ; document.write( person.big( ) ) ; document.write( person.small( ) ) ; document.write( person.fontsize( 1 ) ) ; document.write( person.fontsize( 7 ) ) ; BholaBholaBholaBholaBhola
  • 30. 30 sub( ), sup( ) person = "Bhola" ; document.write( name ) ; document.write( name.sub( ) ) ; document.write( name ) ; document.write( name.sup( ) ) ; Bhola Bhola Bhola Bhola
  • 31. 31 bold( ), italics( ), strike( ) name = "Bhola" ; document.write( name ) ; document.write( name.bold( ) ) ; document.write( name.italics( ) ) ; document.write( name.strike( 1 ) ) ; BholaBholaBholaBhola
  • 32. 32 fixed( ), fontcolor( color ) person = "Bhola" ; document.write( person ) ; document.write( person.fixed( ) ) ; document.write( person.fontcolor( “blue” ) ) ; document.write( person.fontcolor( “orange” ) ) ; BholaBholaBholaBhola
  • 33. 33 link( URL ) hotel = "Bhola Continental" ; document.write( hotel ) ; document.write( hotel.link( “http://www.bholacontinental.com” ) ) ; Bhola ContinentalBhola Continental
  • 34. 34 What was common among all those methods that we just discussed?
  • 35. 35 big( ) <BIG> … </BIG> small( ) <SMALL> … </SMALL> sub( ) <SUB> … </SUB> sup( ) <SUP> … </SUP> bold( ) <B> … </B> italics( ) <I> … </I> strike( ) <S> … </S>
  • 36. 36 fontsize( n ) <FONT size=n> … </FONT> fontcolor( color ) <FONT color=color> … </FONT> fixed( ) <PRE> … </PRE> link( URL ) <A href=URL> …</A>
  • 37. 37 String Methods: All Others split( delimiter ) toLowerCase( ) toUpperCase( ) charAt( n ) substring( n, m ) indexOf( substring, n ) lastIndexOf( substring, n )
  • 38. 38 toLowerCase( ), toUpperCase( ) person = "Bhola" ; document.write( person ) ; document.write( person.toLowerCase( ) ) ; document.write( person.toUpperCase( ) ) ; BholabholaBHOLA
  • 39. 39 charAt( n ) Returns a string containing the character at position n (the position of the 1st character is 0) mister = "Bhola" ; document.write( mister ) ; document.write( mister.charAt( 0 ) ) ; document.write( mister.charAt( 8 ) ) ; document.write( mister.charAt( 2 ) ) ; Bo
  • 40. 40 substring( n, m ) Returns a string containing characters copied from positions n to m - 1 s = "Bhola" ; document.write( s.substring( 1, 3 ) ) ; document.write( s.substring( 0, s.length ) ) ; hoBhola
  • 41. 41 indexOf( substring, n ) Returns the position of the first occurrence of substring that appears on or after the nth position, if any, or -1 if none is found s = "Bhola" ; document.write( s.indexOf( “ola”, 1 ) ) ; document.write( s.indexOf( “z”, 3 ) ) ; 2-1
  • 42. 42 lastIndexOf( substring, n ) Returns the position of the last occurrence of substring that appears on or before the nth position, if any, or -1 if none is found s = "Bhola" ; document.write( s.lastIndexOf( “ola”, 5 ) ) ; document.write( s.lastIndexOf( “b”, 0 ) ) ; 2-1
  • 43. 43 split( delimiter ) Returns an array of strings, created by splitting string into substrings, at delimiter boundaries s = "Hello: I must be going!" ; a = new Array( 5 ) ; b = new Array( 5 ) ; a = s.split( " " ) ; b = s.split( "e" ) ; document.write( "<TABLE>" ) ; for( k = 0; k < 5; k = k + 1 ) document.write( "<TR><TD>", a[ k ], "</TD><TD>", b[ k ], "</TD></TR>" ) ; document.write( "</TABLE>" ) ; Hello: H I llo: I must b must going! be undefined going! undefined
  • 44. 44 Automatic Conversion to Strings • Whenever a non-string is used where JavaScript is expecting a string, it converts that non-string into a string • Example: – The document.write( ) method expects a string (or several strings, separated by commas) as its argument – When a number or a Boolean is passed as an argument to this method, JavaScript automatically converts it into a string before writing it onto the document
  • 45. 45 The ‘+’ Operator • When ‘+’ is used with numeric operands, it adds them • When it is used with string operands, it concatenates them • When one operand is a string, and the other is not, the non-string will first be converted to a string and then the two strings will be concatenated
  • 46. 46 The ‘+’ Operator: Examples document.write( 2 + Math.PI ) ; document.write( "2" + "3" ) ; document.write( "2" + Math.PI ) ; document.write( "Yes" + false ) ; 5.141592653589793 23 23.141592653589793 Yesfalse
  • 47. 47 Strings In Mathematical Expressions When a string is used in a mathematical context, if appropriate, JavaScript first converts it into a number. Otherwise, a “NaN” is the result document.write( "2" * Math.PI ) ; document.write( "Yes" ^ 43 ) ; NaN 6.283185307179586
  • 48. 48 The ‘toString’ Method Explicit conversion to a string EXAMPLE: Convert 100.553478 into a currency format a = 100.553478 ; b = a.toString( ) ; decimalPos = b.indexOf( ".", 0 ) ; c = b.substring( 0, decimalPos + 3 ) ; document.write( c ) ; 100.55
  • 49. 49 Conversion from Strings parseInt( ) and parseFloat( ) methods
  • 50. 50 9000 900 9000900
  • 51. 51 function calc( ) { document.myForm.total.value = document.myForm.salary.value + document.myForm.bonus.value ; }
  • 52. 52 function calc( ) { document.myForm.total.value = parseFloat( document.myForm.salary.value ) + parseFloat( document.myForm.bonus.value ) ; } Why not use parseInt( ) here?
  • 53. 53 During Today’s Lecture … • We become familiar with methods used for manipulating strings • We became able to solve simple problems involving strings
  • 54. 54 Next (the 14th ) Web Dev Lecture: Images & Animation • To become able to add and manipulate images and animations to a Web page