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Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)
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Diplodocus Presentation (Exeter, Apr 2009)

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  • Frederick Palmer, My Second Year of the War (1915): “Unquestionably the tank resembles an armadillo, a caterpillar, a diplodocus, a motor car”. R. Derby Holmes, A Yankee in the Trenches (1918): “For weeks all we knew about them was what we gathered from their appearance as they reeled along, camoufalged with browns and yellows like great toads, and that they were named with quaint names like ‘creme de menthe’ and ‘diplodocus’.
  • Europe, 1915
  • Diplodocuses in Europe, 1915
  • Distribution of diplodoces throughout Europe
  • William Randolph Hearst, proprietor. Example of ‘Yellow Journalism’
  • Man possessed of the ‘WOW’ factor. Sends order to Holland, who can’t suppress a ‘benign smile’ (1927)


  • Holland in Carnegie Magazine, 1927: “The King saw the sketch, and, adjusting his glasses, stepped forward, exclaiming “I say, Carnegie, what in the world is this?” Mr. Carnegie replied, “The hugest quadruped that ever walked the earth, a namesake of mine”. [...] “Oh I say Carnegie”, replied the King, “we must have one of these in the British Museum!”.
  • Temporary exhibit in Exposition Hall, Pittsburgh (museum not yet finished).

  • Lord Avebury unveiled the animal
  • E. Ray Lankester: keeper of zoology in the NHM
  • Carnegie’s geste got attention in the US as well




  • 25 Blocks of wood and concrete to indicate the animal’s shape, and also to create a ready-made ‘dippy kit’; Fritz Drevermann


  • Still as it was placed in 1908.

  • French bigwigs

  • “Es war also recht gruslich geworden” Holland reacts (1910) vehemently, tracks in the 1930s confirm elephant-like stance.
  • Compromise between










  • Transcript

    • 1. A Royal Fuss How Project Diplodocus Came to Europe
    • 2. Big, fierce, and extinct
    • 3. Europe, 1914
    • 4. Europe, 1914
    • 5. Diplodocus as cultural heritage
    • 6. The New York Journal and Advertiser, 11 December 1898
    • 7. Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)
    • 8. Sheep Creek Wyoming 1899
    • 9. John Bell William J. Hatcher Holland (1861-1904 (1848-1932
    • 10. Skibo Castle, 1904
    • 11. Diplodocus (Pitssburgh, 1904)
    • 12. Diplodocus (London, 1905)
    • 13. “Welcome, Little Stranger” London, 12 May 1905
    • 14. E. Ray Lankester in Punch (1904)
    • 15. The Milwaukee Sentinel (1905)
    • 16. The Daily Telegraph (1905)
    • 17. Diplodocus (London, 1905)
    • 18. Senckenberg-Museum Frankfurt-am-Main 1907
    • 19. Scientific American, June 1907
    • 20. Frankfurt Diplodocus longus (1907)
    • 21. Frankfurt Diplodocus longus (1907)
    • 22. Kladderadatsch (7 May 1908) [...] [...] Auch ein viel älterer Herr But even a much older gent noch muß Sees itself forced to wander Den Wanderburschen Goes by the name Diplodocus spielen And belongs among the Er ist genannt fossils Diplodocus‚ Mr. Carnegie packs him und zählt zu den Fossilen joyfully Herr C a r n e g i e verpackt In giant arcs
    • 23. Diplodocus carnegii (Paris, 1908)
    • 24. Diplodocus carnegii (Paris, 1908)
    • 25. Presid a ent lem ence C La nes Bou Ho llan d le Coggesh all Diplodocus carnegii (Paris, 1908)
    • 26. Oliver Hay (1908)
    • 27. Gustav Tornier (1909)
    • 28. Christian Strunz (1934)
    • 29. Christian Strunz (1934)
    • 30. Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins, Megalosaurus bucklandi (Chrystal Palace, 1853)
    • 31. Louis Dollo, 1880s
    • 32. Brontosaurus in AMNH, 1905
    • 33. Reconstructing big specimens
    • 34. Hatcher in lab, 1899
    • 35. Arthur Coggeshall
    • 36. The ‘Frankfurt approach’
    • 37. The ‘Holland approach’ (Paris, 1908)
    • 38. The ‘Holland approach’ (Paris, 1908)

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