ENTERPRISE
CADENCE
Ilio Krumins-Beens, Mariya Breyter
Evaluation

Collaboration
Networking
Engagement
Development

Assistance
Coaching
COACHING
3
AVOID
COACHING
MYOPIA

Photographer: Paul Stevenson
INTERNAL CHANGE AGENTS

Photographer: Carina Wong
CONTINUOUS LEARNING
LEARNERS BECOME TEACHERS

Photographer: Peter Harrison
ASSISTANCE
8
SUPPORT, ALIGNMENT,
& COMMUNICATION

Photographer: Jiří Děcký
OF

Photographer: Philippe Heckel
Roadmap of Roadmaps

ROADMAP OF
ROADMAPS
Inter-team
Dependencies
CROSS TEAM

DEPENDENCIES
IMPEDIMENT REMOVAL TEAM

Illustrator: Matthew Salerno
TOOLS AND FACILITATION

Photographer: Erich Stüssi
DEVELOPMENT
DEFINE THE ROLES

Source: http://fonday.ru/images/tmp/8/9/image/8935
PROVIDE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
DEFINE AREAS OF GROWTH
PROVIDE ONGOING FEEDBACK
ENGAGEMENT
20
ROLL YOUR OWN STORY

Photographer: Phil Roeder
ADVOCATE TO INNOVATE
LEVERAGE AND PARLAY SUCCESS
ENABLE PRIDE IN WORK
TOKENS AND SYMBOLS MATTER
BE SILLY AND HAVE FUN

Photographer: View Minder
NETWORKING
29
TEAM PARTICIPATION
Kaplan Team at NYC Open Space 2012
PARTNERSHIPS&EXPERIENCE SHARING
Agile Case Study Workshop with PMI
EXTERNAL COMPETITIONS
AND TRAINING
AGILE/LEAN MEETUP
BLOGGING
AGILE EVENTS CALENDAR
COLLABORATION
36
COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE
Scrum Master Forum, Product Owner Round Table

Photographer: James Clear
SCRUM MASTER ROTATION

Photographer: Patrick Adwriter
EXPERIENCE SHARING

Photographer: Marko Forsten
EVALUATION

40
CHECK YOUR BEARINGS

Photographer: Michael Salerno
& TRACK OVER TIME
BASELINE (BEFORE)

DECEMBER 2013
APRIL 2011
LOOK FOR
TRENDS
WHERE SHOULD WE INVEST?
KEY STAKEHOLDERS PLAY
MISTAKE: PRACTICES OVER VALUES
Team

Daily Stand-Up

Agile Rollout
Grad Apps
Grad Products
Nursing
Med
PMBR

Core Services...
TOO COMPLICATED
SIMPLE FEEDBACK MECHANISMS
OTHER MEASURES TO CONSIDER
BUSINESS
OUTCOMES
QUALITY METRICS
CUSTOMER RELATED
CONTINUALLY ADJUST
ORIGINAL PRACTICES

OUR FINDINGS

• Scrum

• Flexibility in customizing the
framework that works for teams

• Coaching bas...
ENTERPRISE
CADENCE
Ilio Krumins-Beens, Mariya Breyter
Ilio Krumins-Beens: ilio.krumins-beens@kaplan.com // @iliokbagile
Ma...
Window of Opportunity

Photographer: Bachmont
DOG FOODING

Photographer: JnL
GET IT GOING, THEN LET GO
Agile Practitioner’s Lunch & Learn Events (APLLE)

Photographer: Micky Zlimen
NOT EVERYTHING STICKS

Scrum Master Milk & Cookies

Photographer: Dayland Shannon
FACILITATION & TOOLS
FACILITATION AND TOOLS
LOOKING FOR HIGHEST VALUE
CONTRIBUTING TO AGILE COMMUNITY
SUGGEST CAREER PATH
Tasks:
- is a Scrum Master on one or two medium or
large teams;
- performs work independently;
- parti...
ENVISION CAREER PROGRESSION
Product Owner

Business or IT Executive

Associate Product Owner
Product Manager

Scrum Master...
EXPERIENCE SHARING
Presenting at External Events

Bob Fischer and Jason Novak
Evaluation

Collaboration
Networking
Engagement
Development

Assistance
Coaching
Enterprise CADENCE - Sustaining Agility within your organization
Enterprise CADENCE - Sustaining Agility within your organization
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Enterprise CADENCE - Sustaining Agility within your organization

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Enterprise-wide Agile transformations start with enthusiasm and dedication, and yet most transformations fail within one year from the start of the Agile rollout. We introduce a framework for sustaining and enhancing success of your Agile rollout, which we define in an acronym, CADENCE, which stands for C – coaching, A – assistance, D – development, E – engagement, N – networking, C – collaborative culture, and E – evaluate.

In our presentation, we provide practical advice on how we made Agile CADENCE work for us in enhancing our Agile transformation, and suggest specific ways of making your Agile rollout successful on enterprise level.

Presented by Ilio Krumins-Beens and Mariya Breyter at Agile NYC on 6/17/2013.

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  • At Agile Day NYC 2012, we spoke about the first 6 months of our Agile transformation, about getting buy in and rolling it out, and how we measured success along the way. Now we’re going to talk about how to inspect and adapt, and how to sustain your Agile transformation. If you would like to talk about the approach to starting an Agile transformation, we will be glad to take your questions after but in this specific presentation, we are going to share some of the exciting things we did within last year and some lessons that we learned along the way.
  • http://adtmag.com/articles/2012/07/13/report-says-agile-a-scam.aspx64% of Agile enterprise adoption efforts fail, and most within the first year, and many of the rest do not survive when the coaches leave. We use CADENCE framework to sustain our Agile transformation.A cadence is combination of a certain strong harmonic progression with a resolution to a strong beat that ends a phrase. Cadences might be thought of as the punctuation marks in music - some cadences sound quite final (!) while others only pause a moment (,) and still others leave the listener waiting for more (?).  We think of our Agile transformation as a cadence which repeats and gets stronger over time. The reason we decided to share our experience with you is not to suggest that you use the same set of approaches and activities to establish your cadence. It is rather an encouragement for you to find your own cadence that resonates with you, to not be afraid of mistakes similar to the ones that we had along he way, and to be excited along the way and motivated by the cadence that resonates with you (and some will not, and this is also fine) and the one that makes you feel motivated and gives you encouragement to come up with more ideas and try more and more. So as you listed to our presentation please think about what is your cadence, what makes you excited and energized, and what resonates with you and with you Agile experience.
  • We believe coaching, in essential to sustaining an agile transformation, not just starting. For us, coaching is about working with teams and individuals to make them aware of the values behind agile / lean principles, understand the practices that can be used, but ultimately think for themselves to determine what works best in their context, and continually improve.
  • We believe one reason agile transformations fail to stick is because they focus exclusively on the tech teams, at the exclusion of other teams and stakeholders that the teams interact with. Focusing only on software teams would have failed because of interactions with non-agile teams. To sustain an agile transformation you must connect and educate the entire organization. The Agile transformation is not about changing the technology group, it’s about changing the way we work together.
  • Think of the number of agile transformations that fail when the consultants leave. We believe identifying and having Internal Change Agents are essential to sustaining an agile transformation. Many organizations will get great external consultants to drive their agile adoption but don’t plan for how they’ll sustain the transformation when those experts leave. Three recommendations for you here:Have a executive sponsor outside of technology group. In our case, we have LorinTavel-Thomas our COO.Identify people who are passionate about improving the organization and recruit them to work with you on starting and sustaining the agile transformation. NOTE: these change agents don’t need to be Agile Experts.Consider creating a Center of Excellence, that provides leadership, evangelization, best practices, research, support and/or training for implementing Agile / Lean practices.  Note: This isn’t a dogmatic, hierarchical, structure that lays down the Agile Law, rather we a team that helps, supports and nurtures teams, provides resources and facilitation, and suggests best practices. Setting it up this way was a conscious choice for us. We made a conscious choice to set this up outside of the PMO and to form a team of passionate change agents. This is our team (not all dedicated).We had a great external consultant help us kick off our agile transition, change would not be sustained if we didn’t have a team focused on change management to enable agile.
  • Another reasons Agile Transformations fail is they don’t focus enough on Continuous Learning. For us, training and learning opportunities fell into three categories: Basic Team Training (blue) – Basics of agile Agile Introduction for non-team members – Understanding the values of Agile / Lean, how to interact with themAgile Practitioner Lunch and Learn events – Optional / open to everyone - focused on topics relevant. Initially these Lunch and learn events were lead by Internal Change Agents (CoE Members) focused on addressing patterns we obseved. For example some teams would struggle with estimation, we’d put together an event focused around this, BA role in Agile, and so forth
  • (1) Initially members of the CoE Led all Agile Practitioner Lunch and learn Sessions. Now sessions are almost exclusively led by practitioners, most of whom, didn’t have agile experience or led sessions. Lunch and Learns are nothing new or something we’ve invented. Getting to a place where participants wanted and actively seek to lead these sessions is essential that (2) We’re also working to have scrum masters, most of whom had no former Agile experience, become the coaches and amplify agile practices within there team and with new teams we work with.
  • Our goal as coaches is to make teams as self sufficient as possible.
  • That being said, even teams with the best development / agile practices may require assistance comes in the form of communication, facilitation, and alignment if the rest of the organization works in non-agile ways. We look for anything that is slowing teams down or pain point and try to help remove the blocker they face. Let’s explore the types of assistance our team offers and how this changed over time.The assistance we offer is to help bridge between groups (usually non-agile) and to help teams when they can’t help themselves. We found that during the initial part of our roll out, teams relied on our assistance, and now, as the teams become more mature there is less formal “Assistance” required.Explain budgeting example. Other examplesData Center MoveCompliance requirementsRelease management process changes
  • When the SOS first began it served as a mechanism to make sure teams were communicating with each other. Now it has morphed into a knowledge sharing mechanism between scrum masters and check point with large initiatives with involve non-agile teams.We moved from a 3 times per week -> 2 times per week -> 1 per week.><><><><><><><
  • Purpose: Address any impediments raised by the dedicated teams that could not be resolved informally. Must be: It is an action-oriented meeting where issues are resolved and/or next steps are determined in the meeting itself.Attendees: Facilitator, CTO, All Tech Managers, Product Owner of Transformation, necessary Scrum Masters, and any other ad hoc participants requiredDuration: 30 minutes / Frequency: Weekly* (Canceled if no issues)Deadline: Items for review no later than 5 p.m. the day prior to the meeting.Frequency of holding meeting: 25% of the time. Weighted more heavily when we started the transformation.Many of the issues raised are NOT specific to agile implementation.
  • Another area we provide assistance is in the form of helping to provide tools team and facilitation.Jira support
  • Development here means “employee development” or “professional development”. First year of Agile rollout, we concentrated on Agile practices. Second year, we paid a lot of attention to employee development and career progression. Value – motivation, growth opportunities (interview question)Our goal was to show people that they have growth opportunities. Slides below are Scrum Master-specific. This is because I am a functional manager for scrum masters and spend about 40% of my professional time on scrum master growth and support, and the rest on team coaching and Agile advancement.
  • The Scrum Team (developers & Testers) is the car itself, ready to speed along in whatever direction it is pointed.The Product Owner is the driver, making sure that the car is always going in the right direction.The Scrum Master enables the team to race with high-quality speed, removing obstacles and ensuring smooth execution of the agile process.Image source: http://fonday.ru/images/tmp/8/9/image/8935
  • ALPKLAAPLLE by COO on Managing Career for managers and employeesCSMLeadership class at NYUDale Carnegie TrainingAgile EvenetsWe also have company-wide support programs, such as Kaplan Leadership Academy and Accelerated Leadership Program.
  • For us Engagement is about increasing individuals and team’s passion and commitment to deliver value to the organization. It’s characterized by belief in an organization you work for, desire to work to make things better,understanding of business context and the ‘bigger picture’, being respectful of, and helpful to, colleagues, willingness to ‘go the extra mile’And keeping up to date with developments in the field.We try to provide opportunities which we believe help to increase engagement of those who work at Kaplan.
  • Trust your team and practitioners who are closest to the work to come up with inventive ideas to solve problems that are better than any single person could come up with on their own.Once per quarter, our team gets to “Roll our Own Story” which means they can write their own story and work on anything they are passionate about that they believe will move the needle forward. We present to each other and choose which stories we want to add to our backlog.Things like this have led to the Kaplan Advisory Program that Mariya talked about, and other initiatives like hackathons, and demo fairs.
  • One time initiatives don’t stick. You need to show repeated success, and parlay that into other initiatives that enable engagement.
  • People want to feel that their work is meaningful. Provide them opportunities to showcase their work and get feedback from others.
  • Got 21 teams to participate and over ~400. Although it was a fair bit of work to set up, teams felt recognized and celebrated for their work.
  • Small tokens like silly awards, allow people to be recognized and feel pride in their work.
  • Value of networking:Develop professionallyEngagementBest practices sharingTalent acquisitionShared knowledge
  • Offsite experiencesSingle team
  • Support professional organizations
  • Experiential learningRather than reading, learn it
  • Challenges: most events happen after work (work/life balance)Increased rate of participationNetworking lessons learned: Commitment to quality is importantDo not underestimate dependency on partnersMultiple means of promotionRecord them!Maintain relationship with participantsGet feedbackDo not give up!
  • Use all means of information sharing – twitter, blogging, linkedin forums, user groups
  • Collating Agile events list and sharing with others
  • Building communities of practice within one roleDefining shared goals by roles + business goals by teamScrum Masters, Product Owners, developers/QA, Agile Coaches (CPI)
  • Srcum Room Safari - Collaboration on the team level
  • It’s important to set up ways that you confirm that you’re on the right track. To us this means that on a transformation level you need identify up front how you are going to judge success, endure that you’re going to be aligned with key stakeholders on where you’re going, and track looking for trends over time. We also think it’s good to have external validation to help you see whether you’re on track or not.On a team level you need to have a way to provide feedback to teams and help them understand where they need to improve.
  • Some of you may tell the teams that you work with, not to start development until you know how your going to test whether it works. The same, in our opinion, should be applied to Agile transformations.
  • We also look for trends on a team level. By looking at the Cross tabs of this data, we’re able to see if there are statistically significant difference betweens teams, or roles across teams. This along with qualitative feedback that we get in our surveys helps us build our transformation backlog.
  • Tried different forms of this: (1) Binary, (2) Focus on
  • Product Owner, Scrum Master, Release Planning, Product backlog, Sprint Planning, Sprint Execution, Sprint Review, Retrospective. Over 100 measures. 4 step score. 0 Not Started, Starting to Implement, implemented with Challenges, Implemented and Working.A simple assessment tool to "inspect" scrum maturity. Success of "Adoption" is what differentiates high-performing and low performing teams. There is much more to high-performance than just doing things mentioned in the assessment tool, hence, scoring high is not a key goal. It is more of a starting point.A score is assigned to each response (see items in parentheses). The score is not as relevant as doing the right thing. Let's just say this - maximize your score in each section; a near perfect score is ideal. Anything where you have a "less good" answer should be fixed. Tool will help you to inspect, however, you need to take initiatives to adapt as per the gaps identified depending on your team's capacity to fill those gaps.
  • Simple four square mechanism to give feedback to teams on what’s working well, improvement opportunities, questions, and suggestions. A coach usually engages with a and provides feedback on all ceremoies and provides feedback to teams on the following dimensions. This is an example of a feedback for a team’s sprint review. Team comes up with action items and a point in time to check back on these items.
  • Identifying the right window of opportunity is key. It’s normal, as part of any transformation, to encounter resistance. Rather than fighting that resistance head on we wait for the right window of opportunity.
  • When we transitioned, the team members most impacted where the project managers who became scrum masters. This was a complete redefinition of their job. We felt a forum where scrum masters could get together and share their challenges / struggles was important. We set up a “Scrum Master Milk and cookies” meetings and this was extremely beneficial. After a few months, most scrum masters felt comfortable in their role, and we didn’t need to continue holding the meeting.
  • Another area we provide assistance is in the form of helping to provide tools team and facilitation.Jira support
  • Scrum master is a servant leader. However, the titles reflect the level of experience and skills. It is similar to Scrum.org SM certification progression.
  • This was not something we planned to do when we were rolling out Agile and we know that many Agilists do not support this approach. We did not see defining formal title progression as our goal but it was important for us to meet employees where they were at. Though we did not plan it, we made a choice to do it because it was important for them. Reasoning: people need progression. “Ladder” is a traditional (vertical) career progression; however, the career landscape is changing. Organizations become flatter; work becomes increasingly virtual, collaborative, and dispersed. Careers zig and zag. As a result, “lattice” career model is better suited for today’s global business where employees do not need a vertical progression to be defined anymore. Source: The Corporate Lattice: Achieving High Performance in the Changing World of Work” by Cathleen Benko and Molly Anderson. – Harvard Business Press, Aug 3, 2010The system we came up with is a tiered system. Some agilists do not like it. We are doing it because scrum masters wanted it and because it guides them through their professional development. We are about employees and want to invest in them.
  • A cadence is combination of a certain strong harmonic progression with a resolution to a strong beat that ends a phrase. Cadences might be thought of as the punctuation marks in music - some cadences sound quite final (!) while others only pause a moment (,) and still others leave the listener waiting for more (?).  We think of our Agile transformation as a cadence which repeats and gets stronger over time. The reason we decided to share our experience with you is not to suggest that you use the same set of approaches and activities to establish your cadence. It is rather an encouragement for you to find your own cadence that resonates with you, to not be afraid of mistakes similar to the ones that we had along he way, and to be excited along the way and motivated by the cadence that resonates with you (and some will not, and this is also fine) and the one that makes you feel motivated and gives you encouragement to come up with more ideas and try more and more. So as you listed to our presentation please think about what is your cadence, what makes you excited and energized, and what resonates with you and with you Agile experience.
  • Enterprise CADENCE - Sustaining Agility within your organization

    1. 1. ENTERPRISE CADENCE Ilio Krumins-Beens, Mariya Breyter
    2. 2. Evaluation Collaboration Networking Engagement Development Assistance Coaching
    3. 3. COACHING 3
    4. 4. AVOID COACHING MYOPIA Photographer: Paul Stevenson
    5. 5. INTERNAL CHANGE AGENTS Photographer: Carina Wong
    6. 6. CONTINUOUS LEARNING
    7. 7. LEARNERS BECOME TEACHERS Photographer: Peter Harrison
    8. 8. ASSISTANCE 8
    9. 9. SUPPORT, ALIGNMENT, & COMMUNICATION Photographer: Jiří Děcký
    10. 10. OF Photographer: Philippe Heckel
    11. 11. Roadmap of Roadmaps ROADMAP OF ROADMAPS
    12. 12. Inter-team Dependencies CROSS TEAM DEPENDENCIES
    13. 13. IMPEDIMENT REMOVAL TEAM Illustrator: Matthew Salerno
    14. 14. TOOLS AND FACILITATION Photographer: Erich Stüssi
    15. 15. DEVELOPMENT
    16. 16. DEFINE THE ROLES Source: http://fonday.ru/images/tmp/8/9/image/8935
    17. 17. PROVIDE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES
    18. 18. DEFINE AREAS OF GROWTH
    19. 19. PROVIDE ONGOING FEEDBACK
    20. 20. ENGAGEMENT 20
    21. 21. ROLL YOUR OWN STORY Photographer: Phil Roeder
    22. 22. ADVOCATE TO INNOVATE
    23. 23. LEVERAGE AND PARLAY SUCCESS
    24. 24. ENABLE PRIDE IN WORK
    25. 25. TOKENS AND SYMBOLS MATTER
    26. 26. BE SILLY AND HAVE FUN Photographer: View Minder
    27. 27. NETWORKING 29
    28. 28. TEAM PARTICIPATION Kaplan Team at NYC Open Space 2012
    29. 29. PARTNERSHIPS&EXPERIENCE SHARING Agile Case Study Workshop with PMI
    30. 30. EXTERNAL COMPETITIONS AND TRAINING
    31. 31. AGILE/LEAN MEETUP
    32. 32. BLOGGING
    33. 33. AGILE EVENTS CALENDAR
    34. 34. COLLABORATION 36
    35. 35. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE Scrum Master Forum, Product Owner Round Table Photographer: James Clear
    36. 36. SCRUM MASTER ROTATION Photographer: Patrick Adwriter
    37. 37. EXPERIENCE SHARING Photographer: Marko Forsten
    38. 38. EVALUATION 40
    39. 39. CHECK YOUR BEARINGS Photographer: Michael Salerno
    40. 40. & TRACK OVER TIME BASELINE (BEFORE) DECEMBER 2013 APRIL 2011
    41. 41. LOOK FOR TRENDS
    42. 42. WHERE SHOULD WE INVEST?
    43. 43. KEY STAKEHOLDERS PLAY
    44. 44. MISTAKE: PRACTICES OVER VALUES Team Daily Stand-Up Agile Rollout Grad Apps Grad Products Nursing Med PMBR Core Services Core Data Reporting Biz System1 Pre-enroll CRM Biz System2 Post-Enroll Proj Athena Rev Man* LMS & Brain For Projects Sprint Planning Demo Rehearsal Demo Sprint Retro
    45. 45. TOO COMPLICATED
    46. 46. SIMPLE FEEDBACK MECHANISMS
    47. 47. OTHER MEASURES TO CONSIDER BUSINESS OUTCOMES QUALITY METRICS CUSTOMER RELATED
    48. 48. CONTINUALLY ADJUST
    49. 49. ORIGINAL PRACTICES OUR FINDINGS • Scrum • Flexibility in customizing the framework that works for teams • Coaching based on coaches’ availability • Dedicated coaching • Coach all teams • “Pull” model rather than “push” • Focus on practices and processes • Focus on organizational culture • Software teams • Any teams • Standard set of scrum ceremonies • Custom ceremonies (CPI, Book club), team traditions EVALUATE YOUR CADENCE. LEARN CONSTANTLY
    50. 50. ENTERPRISE CADENCE Ilio Krumins-Beens, Mariya Breyter Ilio Krumins-Beens: ilio.krumins-beens@kaplan.com // @iliokbagile Mariya Breyter: mariya.breyter@kaplan.com // @mbreyter
    51. 51. Window of Opportunity Photographer: Bachmont
    52. 52. DOG FOODING Photographer: JnL
    53. 53. GET IT GOING, THEN LET GO Agile Practitioner’s Lunch & Learn Events (APLLE) Photographer: Micky Zlimen
    54. 54. NOT EVERYTHING STICKS Scrum Master Milk & Cookies Photographer: Dayland Shannon
    55. 55. FACILITATION & TOOLS
    56. 56. FACILITATION AND TOOLS
    57. 57. LOOKING FOR HIGHEST VALUE
    58. 58. CONTRIBUTING TO AGILE COMMUNITY
    59. 59. SUGGEST CAREER PATH Tasks: - is a Scrum Master on one or two medium or large teams; - performs work independently; - participates/volunteers within scrum master community; - performs all tasks in accordance with KTP Scrum Master role description. - team(s) follow all Agile principles and meet commitment for over 70% of their sprints. Tasks: - is a Scrum Master on two medium –size Agile teams or one consolidated team; - Performs all tasks in accordance with KTP Scrum Master role description; - builds a self-organizing and high-performing team which meets commitment 90% of sprints; - suggests solutions to complex issues with multiple teams involved; - - garners respect within the scrum master community. Experience and skills: - 1-5 years of SM experience; - thoroughly understands software delivery process, - possesses subject matter expertise in teams’ products, - possesses CSM or relevant certification (preferable); - participates in Agile community, - attends external Agile events and shared Agile best practices with others. Experience and skills: - 3-7 years of SM experience; All skills of SM plus: - superb decision making skills, consensus building, communication and facilitation skills; - possesses CSM, CSP or PMI-ACP certification (preferable); - contributes to agile practices within and outside of Kaplan; - expert-level knowledge of SBU products. Team Leader on a Successful Agile team Scrum Master Team Leader on High Performing Agile teams; Mentor to Others Sr. Scrum Master Tasks: - coaches other scrum masters in Scrum best practices; All tasks of Sr. SM plus: - defines agile practices within and outside of Kaplan; - performs Agile training as needed with over 80% satisfaction rate; - drives complex cross-term issues to effective resolution. Builds and Coaches HighPerforming Agile teams on Enterprise Level Experience and skills: - 5+years of Agile experience and 1+ year of mentoring/coaching; All skills of Sr. SM plus: - consulting and/or training experience, - ability to build consensus and explain Agile values to the teams, - possesses CSP, PMI-ACP, or related certification; - positive attitude and ability to propose effective solutions. Agile Coach
    60. 60. ENVISION CAREER PROGRESSION Product Owner Business or IT Executive Associate Product Owner Product Manager Scrum Master Sr. Scrum Master Functional Manager Agile Coach
    61. 61. EXPERIENCE SHARING Presenting at External Events Bob Fischer and Jason Novak
    62. 62. Evaluation Collaboration Networking Engagement Development Assistance Coaching
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