Experimenting with the SensesIsabelle LesschaeveVineland campus seminar May 6 2010                                     © 2...
Product=Extrinsic + Intrinsic attributes               Extrinsic: presentation,               brand/variety name, informat...
Information and    Shopping 101                                        Experience            Expectations                 ...
Product Use        Sensory properties      Confirmation or disconfirmation of                expectations Positive        ...
Our Research Focus• Understand factors affecting consumer  interest, purchase and repeated use  – Non sensory  – Sensory
Methods• Measure consumers’ hedonic responses• Measure sensory attributes• 2 “instruments”  – Consumer panel  – Trained se...
What is a sensory panel?                           •   A group of                               individuals, selected     ...
Why do we need a sensory panel?• Large variation in sensory acuity among  individuals  – Sensory detectors need to cover a...
Sensory panel• At the end of the training:  – Panellists are not naïve consumers anymore  – They are calibrated to provide...
Sensory Panel’s roles• Determine if products are perceived as being  different:   – Variety comparison   – Wines produced ...
Sensory practices
Vineland panel• Vinelanders are invited to participate to short  sessions   – Difference tests         385            279 ...
Consumer panel• Vineland database  – N=300+  – Active panel recruitment    in Niagara and Ontario• On-line panel of 3rd pa...
Sensory preference                                           Observations (axes F1 and F2: 48.18 %)                 15    ...
IdeaMap: Concept testingHow likely are you to CHOOSE this product? on a 9 point scale: 1 = Not at all likely ... 9 = Very ...
Role of consumer panel• In-store test
© 2009 Vineland Research and Innovation Centre
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Vineland Seminar On Consumer Insight Dept

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Seminar to Vineland employees

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Vineland Seminar On Consumer Insight Dept

  1. 1. Experimenting with the SensesIsabelle LesschaeveVineland campus seminar May 6 2010 © 2009 Vineland Research and Innovation Centre
  2. 2. Product=Extrinsic + Intrinsic attributes Extrinsic: presentation, brand/variety name, information, price, etc. Intrinsic: appearance, smell, texture, taste, nutritional benefits
  3. 3. Information and Shopping 101 Experience Expectations Prior Expectations Expectations raised lowered Product: label, package, ads, price low high Expectations rejection acceptanceDeliza and MacFie, JSens Stud 11,103, 1996
  4. 4. Product Use Sensory properties Confirmation or disconfirmation of expectations Positive Negative selectionRepeated Use Rejection Model for Illustrating the effects of expectations on product selection and evaluation. Deliza and MacFie, JSens Stud 11,103, 1996
  5. 5. Our Research Focus• Understand factors affecting consumer interest, purchase and repeated use – Non sensory – Sensory
  6. 6. Methods• Measure consumers’ hedonic responses• Measure sensory attributes• 2 “instruments” – Consumer panel – Trained sensory panel
  7. 7. What is a sensory panel? • A group of individuals, selected and trained to perform sensory tasks
  8. 8. Why do we need a sensory panel?• Large variation in sensory acuity among individuals – Sensory detectors need to cover a large spectrum of sensations and have a normal detection threshold• Ability to describe perceptions• Being available• Not involved in the company Screening
  9. 9. Sensory panel• At the end of the training: – Panellists are not naïve consumers anymore – They are calibrated to provide objective, accurate and repeatable measurements – Panel is similar to a high tech analytical tool
  10. 10. Sensory Panel’s roles• Determine if products are perceived as being different: – Variety comparison – Wines produced using different process – Produce with different nutritional content• If there is a difference: – How big is it? On which attributes?
  11. 11. Sensory practices
  12. 12. Vineland panel• Vinelanders are invited to participate to short sessions – Difference tests 385 279 897 – Pilot test questionnaires for consumer tests
  13. 13. Consumer panel• Vineland database – N=300+ – Active panel recruitment in Niagara and Ontario• On-line panel of 3rd parties• Objective by 2012: – Vineland database include representative samples of Canadian hort consumers
  14. 14. Sensory preference Observations (axes F1 and F2: 48.18 %) 15 6 Petroleum 10 Oak 14 10 14% 1 77% 5 3 Smooth Burning 12 7 0 11 F2 (12.27 %) 5 18 9 Liking -5 Sweet 9% -10 16 Lychee -15 Peas Pepper Floral -20 -25 -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 F1 (35.91 %)
  15. 15. IdeaMap: Concept testingHow likely are you to CHOOSE this product? on a 9 point scale: 1 = Not at all likely ... 9 = Very LikelyHow much would you SPEND on this product (per pound)? on a 5 point scale: 1= $1.50 or less 2 = $1.51 - $3.00 3 = $3.01 - $4.50 4 = $4.51 - $6.00 5 = $6.01+ © 2010 Vineland Research and Innovation Centre
  16. 16. Role of consumer panel• In-store test
  17. 17. © 2009 Vineland Research and Innovation Centre
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