Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Writing a Lab Report

on

  • 1,015 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,015
Views on SlideShare
938
Embed Views
77

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

3 Embeds 77

http://sciencewithsaxe.blogspot.com 73
http://www.sciencewithsaxe.blogspot.com 3
http://sciencewithsaxe.blogspot.com.es 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Writing a Lab Report Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Yikes! You’re writing a lab report!
  • 2. What does a lab report need to have?
    YOUR IDEAS
    THE PARTS
    Title
    Introduction
    Materials & Methods
    Results
    Discussion
    Conclusion
    Literature Cited
  • 3. Ideas for a title for this lab
  • 4. What is a scientific title?
    A scientific title generally has:
    1. The environmental factors that were changed (light, temperature).
    2. The thing that was measured (growth).
    3. The specific organism that was studied (the bacterium, Escherichia coli).
    "The Effects of Light and Temperature on the Growth of Populations of the Bacterium, Escherichia coli "
  • 5. What could the title be for this experiment?
    Looking at the connection between temperature and the speed at which molecules move.
  • 6. Introduction
    The Introduction is the statement of the problem that you investigated.
    Include background information
    How does what we did relate to wind?
    What is convection?
    How does what we did relate to convection?
  • 7. Materials & Methods
    Do not write a list!
    Do not say: “First get a foam cup. Then put hot water in it. Next take the temperature. After….”
    Describe what you did: A foam cup was filled almost to the top with hot water. The temperature of the water was recorded at the start of each trial.
  • 8. Results
    Present summarized data
    Do NOT include raw data
    Wait. What is “raw data?”
    Raw data is the data you collected in your experiment. Data that hasn’t been ‘cooked;’
    ‘Cooked’ data is data that you have manipulated.
    Averages, graphs, tables, REMEMBER TITLES!
  • 9. Discussion
    Interpret your data
    What patterns did you see?
    What happened that was strange or unexpected?
    Give at least three sources of error or things you would change in the experiment next time.
  • 10. Conclusion
    This section simply states what the researcher thinks the data mean, and, as such, should relate directly back to the problem/question stated in the introduction.
    This section should not offer any reasons for those particular conclusions
  • 11. Literature Cited
    This is your bibliography. If you gave a definition of convection in your introduction, you need to say where that definition came from.
  • 12. Headings
    Each section should be clearly identified.