Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Re...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Ae33166173

109 views
53 views

Published on

International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) is an open access online peer reviewed international journal that publishes research and review articles in the fields of Computer Science, Neural Networks, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Plastic Engineering, Food Technology, Textile Engineering, Nano Technology & science, Power Electronics, Electronics & Communication Engineering, Computational mathematics, Image processing, Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering, Environmental Engineering, VLSI Testing & Low Power VLSI Design etc.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
109
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ae33166173

  1. 1. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173166 | P a g eExperimental Study of Base Isolation System for SmallEquipments and Its EvaluationKatsumi Kurita*, Shigeru Aoki*, Yuji Nakanishi**,Kazutoshi Tominaga**, Mitsuo Kanazawa****(Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology, JAPAN)** (Department of Production Systems Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan College of Industrial Technology,JAPAN)*** (Kanazawa Seisakusyo Co. Ltd., JAPAN)ABSTRACTA new device of reduction for seismicresponse using friction force was developed. Inthis paper, vibration analysis of a small baseisolation system using the device was investigatedby excitation experiment using artificial seismicwaves. Peak acceleration amplitude on the baseisolation system has decreased to 43 - 90%compared to input waves. And root mean square(RMS) amplitude has decreased to 76 - 94%.Although a spectral peak around 0.5 Hz that isequal to natural frequency of the system wasidentified when the input waves with lowfrequency band component were used, it wasdecreased using friction bearings that generatehigh friction force. Comparing the responsewaveforms of the excitation experiment and ofthe numerical analysis using a linear 2DOFmodel, it was good agreement. This system isuseful for reduction of seismic response.Keywords - Seismic Response, Friction Bearing,Ball, Marble Plate, Natural Frequency, DampingRatioI. INTRODUCTIONIn order to protect building structures fromseismic ground motion, structures are retrofitted bytechniques of seismic isolation system [1-4] orvibration control system [5-6]. However, atechnique of increasing structure stiffness for anti-earthquake reinforcement is generally used forretrofitting existing building structures. Thereforeseismic response of structures does not decreaseremarkably. Equipments set on building inside suchas a computer server and an office automationequipment will overturn during a big earthquake,therefore they are higher than their width anddepth. So small base isolation systems that can beinstalled inside building to decrease seismicresponse have been extensively developed [7]. Forexample, ball isolation type device [8], roller typeusing liner rail isolation device [9], frictionpendulum isolation device with poly-curvature rail[10, 11] are used. The ball isolation type deviceshows good reduction of seismic response.However amplification by resonance is quite big, itis serious problem if an input wave is composed ofbroad band components that included naturalfrequency of this device. The isolation system witha friction damping is developed. Since themechanism is complicated, it is not easy to install.So sliding type isolation device [12] is also used.Although the mechanism is very simple, it has nomechanism that generates restring force. Thereforeit is impossible to return the original position after abig shaking.We have developed a simple device usingfriction force to reduce seismic response [13]. Thedevice consists of two plates having sphericalconcaves and an oval type metal (marble plate) or aspherical metal (steel ball).In this study, vibration analysis of the smallbase isolation system that consisted of the device isinvestigated by excitation experiment usingartificial seismic waves.II. FRICTION BEARINGA friction bearing is shown in Fig. 1. Itconsists of two plates having spherical and themarble plate. Shape of the plate is square andlength of 334 mm and thickness of edge is 62.4mm. Radius of the concave is 500-600 mm. Themarble plate slides between two plates and groundvibration is transmitted to the small base isolationsystem via the marble plate. It automatically returnsto the original position by resilience of two concaveplates. A 50mm steel ball is prepared instead of themarble plate. The restoring force in case of the steelball is larger than the one in case of the marbleplate. On the other hand, damping ratio in case ofthe steel ball is smaller.Figure 1 An example of friction bearing
  2. 2. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173167 | P a g eThe small base isolation system composedof friction bearings is shown in Fig. 2. This deviceis placed at each corner. The combination offriction bearings on this experiment is shown inTable 1. The same bearings are placed on thediagonal.Figure 2 Size of the small base isolation systemusing the friction bearings (mm)Table 1 Combination of the friction bearings for thesmall base isolation systemCombination of the friction bearingsCase 1 4 Steel ballsCase 2 2 Steel balls and 2 Marble platesCase 3 4 Marble platesIII. EXCITATION EXPERIMENT USING ARTIFICIALSEISMIC WAVESTo know dynamic characteristics of thesmall base isolation system, the excitationexperiment of this system is done using artificialseismic waves. Experimental setup is shown in Fig.3. This system that installed a computer server rackis put on the shaking table. Size of this rack is 1850mm height, 860 mm width, 1000 mm length. Andits weight is 100 kg. Acceleration sensors (KyowaAS-2GA) are installed on the shaking table, thissystem and the top of the computer server rack.Signal from acceleration sensors are recorded to aPC through an interface (Kyowa PCD-300A).Sampling rate is 0.01 sec/points.Input waveforms as artificial seismic wavesare shown in Fig. 4, and their Fourier spectra areshown in Fig. 5. Predominant frequency of theinput waves is about 10Hz that is natural frequencyof actual machine structures. The Fourier amplitudeof the input wave 1 decreases at the frequency oflower than 1Hz. On the other hand, the amplitudeof the input wave 2 and the input wave 3 decreasesat the frequency of lower than 0.5Hz and lowerthan 0.4 Hz, respectively.Figure 3 Experimental setupFigure 4 Artificial seismic waveforms as inputwavesIV. RESULTS4.1 Acceleration response waveformsAcceleration response waveforms on thesmall base isolation system are shown in Fig. 6 -Fig. 8. In case of the input wave 1, amplitude of theacceleration response waveform on the systemusing four sets of marble plate type friction bearing(case 3) is smallest. On the other hand, in case of-2000-10000100020000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Input 1Acc(cm/s2)-2000-10000100020000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Input 2Acc(cm/s2)-2000-10000100020000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Input 3Acc(cm/s2)
  3. 3. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173168 | P a g eFigure 5 Fourier spectra of the input wavesthe input wave 2 and the input wave 3, amplitudeon the system using two sets of marble plate typeand two sets of steel ball type friction bearing (case2) is smallest. Although amplitude in case 1 isdecreased until the time of 15 sec, large responseamplitude with the frequency band around 0.5 Hz isidentified.4.2 Peak amplitude and root mean squareamplitude of acceleration response wavesPeak amplitude and root mean squareamplitude (RMS) of acceleration responsewaveforms are shown in Table 2 - Table 4 andTable 5 - Table 7, respectively. Peak amplitude ofacceleration response waves on the small baseisolation system decreases to 43 - 90 % comparedto the input waves. Also RMS decreases to 76 -94 %. However the best case of decreasing rate ofpeak amplitude is not always the best case ofdecreasing rate of RMS. This system has goodability to reduce seismic response in acceleration.Figure 6 Acceleration response waveforms (Inputwave 1)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case1ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case2ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case3ResponseAcc(cm/s2)Figure 7 Acceleration response waveforms (Inputwave 2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case1ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case2ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case3ResponseAcc(cm/s2)Figure 8 Acceleration response waveforms (Inputwave 3)11010010000.1 1 10 100FourierAmplitude(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Input111010010000.1 1 10 100FourierAmplitude(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Input211010010000.1 1 10 100FourierAmplitude(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Input3-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case1ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case2ResponseAcc(cm/s2)-500-25002505000 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40Time(s)Case3ResponseAcc(cm/s2)
  4. 4. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173169 | P a g eTable 2 Peak amplitude of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 1)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 1874 152case2 1790 168case3 1891 489Table 3 Peak amplitude of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 2)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 1562 413case2 1807 228case3 1655 506Table 4 Peak amplitude of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 3)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 1469 836case2 1376 202case3 1359 574Table 5 Root mean square of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 1)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 5.19 0.297case2 5.08 0.401case3 5.06 1.115Table 6 Root mean square of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 2)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 5.03 0.712case2 5.01 0.493case3 5.01 1.244Table 7 Root mean square of acceleration responsewave (Input wave 3)Input(cm/s2) Res.(cm/s2)case1 5.49 1.163case2 5.47 0.520case3 5.42 1.32211010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 111010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 211010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 311010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 111010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 211010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 3Figure 9 Fourier spectra of the acceleration response waves (Input wave 1)Figure 10 Fourier spectra of the acceleration response waves (Input wave 2)
  5. 5. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173170 | P a g e4.3 Fourier spectra of acceleration responsewavesFourier spectra of acceleration responsewaves recorded on the small base isolation systemare shown in Fig. 9 - Fig. 11. In case of the inputwave 1, although the shape of Fourier spectrumbetween in case 2 and in case 3 is almost same, thelevel of Fourier amplitude in case 3 is higher thanthe one in case 2. In case 1 of the input wave 2 andthe input wave 3, a peak of Fourier spectrumaround the frequency of 0.5 Hz can be identified.This frequency band is equivalent to naturalfrequency of the small base isolation system, it isgenerated by resonance. On the other hand, in case3 of the input wave 2 and input wave 3, the peak ofspectrum amplitude by resonance is restrained.However the decreasing rate at the high frequencyband gets worse.4.4 Spectral ratiosSpectral ratios that divided the input wavespectrum by the response acceleration spectrum onthe small base isolation system in the input wave 3are shown in Fig. 12. A peak is identified at thefrequency of 0.5 Hz in case 1. Increasing themarble plate type friction bearing on this system,value of the peak is decreased. Some sharp pulsesin acceleration response waveform from 25 to 35 sshown in Fig. 8 are identified in case 1. Sincemotion of the small base isolation system byresonance has exceeded a clearance ofdisplacement, the sever rack on this system lost abalance and rocking motion was generated. So thereduction rate at the frequency from 1 Hz to 5 Hz isnot so good. In case 3, value of the peak byresonance is restrained using the marble platebearing that may generate high friction force.However, the decreasing rate at the high frequencyband is getting worse.V. ESTIMATION OF NATURAL FREQUENCY ANDDAMPING RATIO OF THIS SYSTEMFitting a theoretical transfer function forthe spectral ratio by a forwarding model, naturalfrequency and damping ratio that are veryimportant factor to control this system areevaluated. A model of liner 2DOF system shown inFig. 13 is used for the theoretical transfer function.The equation of motion is as followings,0)()()()( 212112121111  xxkyxkxxcyxcxm (1)0)()( 12212222  xxkxxcxm  (2)11010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 111010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 211010010000.1 1 10 100FourierSpectrum(gal*s)Frequency(Hz)Case 30.010.11100.1 1 10 100SpectralRatioFrequency(Hz)Case 10.010.11100.1 1 10 100SpectralRatioFrequency(Hz)Case 20.010.11100.1 1 10 100SpectralRatioFrequency(Hz)Case 3Figure 11 Fourier spectra of the acceleration response waves (Input wave 3)Figure 12 Spectral ratios dividing the input wave spectrum by the response acceleration spectrum (Input wave 3)
  6. 6. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173171 | P a g ewhere m is mass, xxx ,, are displacement, velocityand acceleration, and yy , are displacement andvelocity of an input motion, k is spring constant,and c is damping coefficient. And the transferfunctions calculated the Laplace transform of theequation (1) and (2) are as followings,CBAiYiX)()(1(3)CBDiYiX)()(2(4)where)2)(2( 222221121 sssA   )1(2}))({( 22122222222221   sssssB)2(2 2222211 sssC  )2)(2( 22221121 ssD   is angular frequency, i is imaginary unit, 0 isnatural angular frequency,  is damping ratio,  ismass ratio. The mass of computer server 1m andthe upper plate mass of the base isolation system2m were 100 kg and 35 kg, respectively, the massratio was 2.85.An example of comparison between thespectral ratio and the fitting of the transfer functionis shown in Fig. 14. And evaluated the parametersare shown in Table 8. The shape of the theoreticaltransfer function indicates two resonance peaks andan anti-resonance valley. If the valley of thespectral ratio at the frequency of 5Hz is consideredto be an anti-resonance point, although locations ofpeaks are a little bit different, it is possible toexplain the shape of the spectral ratio.VI. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS6.1 Analytical modelThe base isolation system isapproximately modeled by a linear 2DOF model inFig. 13. And natural frequency and damping ratiofor this analysis are used the values shown in Table8 evaluated in chapter 5. The calculation is done infrequency domain using equation (3).6.2 Comparison acceleration responsewaveforms between by the excitation experimentand by the numerical analysisComparison acceleration responsewaveforms between by the excitation experimentand by the numerical analysis are shown in Fig. 15.And peak acceleration amplitude and RMS areshown in Table 9 and Table 10.In excitation experiment of case 1, sinceFigure 13 2DOF model for calculating a theoreticaltransfer function0.010.11100.1 1 10 100RatioFittingSpectralRatioFrequency(Hz)Case2Figure 14 Comparison between the spectral ratioand the theoretical transfer function using 2DOFTable 8 Natural frequency and damping ratio (inputwave 3)Natural frequencyfo (Hz)Damping ratio ζBase Server Base ServerCase 1 0.90 2.42 0.14 0.002Case 2 0.85 3.70 0.35 0.03Case 3 0.81 3.72 1.50 0.03motion of the small base isolation system byresonance has exceeded clearance of the frictionbearing, the sever rack on this system lost a balanceand rocking motion was generated. Therefore some
  7. 7. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173172 | P a g esharp pulses on the response waveform wereidentified. However the response waveform shapesbetween them are almost same except the part ofsome sharp pulses. In case 2 and case 3, althoughthe different of peak acceleration amplitude andRMS between by the excitation experiment and bythe numerical analysis is less than 35 %, theresponse waveforms on the numerical analysis bythe linear 2DOF approximately explain theresponse waveforms.Figure 15 Comparison between response waveformand numerical analysisTable 9 Comparison of peak amplitude ofacceleration response wave (input wave 3)Peak amplitude ofacceleration response waveExperiment(cm/s2)Numerical (cm/s2)Case 1 836 221Case 2 203 271Case 3 574 521Table 10 Comparison of RMS (input wave 3)RMS of acceleration response waveExperiment(cm/s2)Numerical (cm/s2)Case 1 90.2 46.3Case 2 40.4 50.4Case 3 102.6 137.6VII. CONCLUSIONWe developed the new device thatsandwiched the marble plate or the steel ballbetween two plates of spherical concave, and builtthe small base isolation system composed of thisdevice. And vibration analysis of this system wasinvestigated by excitation experiment usingartificial seismic waves.In excitation experiment using artificialseismic waves, peak acceleration amplitude on thissystem has decreased to 43 - 90 % compared to theinput waves. Also RMS amplitude decreased to 76- 94 %.The spectral peak around the frequencyof 0.5 Hz on the Fourier spectrum was identifiedwhen the input waves with low frequency bandcomponent were used, the peak on the spectral ratioin case using four sets of the steel ball type frictionbearing was identified. Since this frequency bandwas equivalent to natural frequency of this system,it was generated by resonance. It was decreasedusing the friction bearings that generated highfriction force. However the decreasing rate at thehigh frequency band gets worse.Fitting the theoretical transfer functionfor the spectral ratio by a forwarding model, naturalfrequency was evaluated to f0=0.81 – 0.90 Hz. Anddamping ratio in case of four sets of the steel balltype friction bearing (low friction) and in case offour sets of the marble plate type friction bearing(high friction) were 0.14 and 1.50, respectively.Comparing the acceleration responsewaveforms between by excitation experiment andby numerical analysis, it is good agreement.This system is effective for reductionof seismic response.REFERENCES[1] M Ozaki, Y. Adachi, Y. Iwahori, and N. Ishii,Application of fuzzy theory to writerrecognition of Chinese characters,International Journal of Modelling andSimulation, 18(2), 1998, 112-116.[2] Ooki, N., Mochizuki, S., Ito, A., Abe, F.,Ogawa, O., Hosaka, Y., Akiyama, M. andMochida, Y., Seismic isolation retrofit topreserve the national museum of western art,AIJ Technol. Des., No. 6, 19-22, 1988 (inJapanese with English abstract).[3] Kawamura, S., Sugisaki, R., Ogura, K.,Maezawa S., Tanaka, S. and Yajima, A.,Seismic isolation retrofit in Japan, Proc. of the12th World Conference on EarthquakeEngineering, 2523, 2000.[4] Masuzawa, Y. and Hisada, Y., Seismicisolation retrofit of a prefectural governmentoffice building, Proc. of the 13th WorldConference on Earthquake Engineering, PaperNo. 1199, 2004.
  8. 8. Katsumi Kurita, Shigeru Aoki, Yuji Nakanishi, Kazutoshi Tominaga, Mitsuo Kanazawa /International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) ISSN: 2248-9622www.ijera.com Vol. 3, Issue 3, May-Jun 2013, pp.166-173173 | P a g e[5] Nishizawa, T., Ohno, T. and Ohnishi, M.,Summary of study for the best choice ofseismic retrofit for Aichi prefectural officebuilding, AIJ Technol. Des., No. 24, 177-182,2006 (in Japanese with English abstract).[6] Yokouchi, H., Nakanishi, S., Adachi, Y. andAoyama, H., Earthquake responsecharacteristics of an existing R/C buildingretrofitted with friction dampers, J. Struct.Eng., AIJ, Vol. 73, No. 628, 947-955, 2008 (inJapanese with English abstract).[7] Ozaki, H., Harada, H. and Murakami K.,Challenging applications of seismic dampersfor retrofit of tall building, Proc. of the 14thWorld Conference on Earthquake Engineering,Paper ID S05-02-008, 2008.[8] Myslimaj B., Gamble S., Chin-Quee D.Davies A. and Breukelman B., Base isolationtechnologies for seismic protection of museumartifacts, International Association of MuseumFacilities Administrators (IAMFA) The 2003IAMFA Annual Conference in San Francisco,California, September 21-24, 2003.[9] Tsai M., Wu S., Chang K. and Lee G., Shakingtable tests of a scaled bridge model withrolling-type seismic isolation bearings,Engineering Structures, 29, 694–702, 2007.[10]Ueda, S., Akimoto, M., Enomoto, T. andFujita, T., Study of roller type seismic isolationdevice for works of art, Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech.Eng., Series C, Vol. 71, No. 703, pp. 807 – 812,2005 (in Japanese with English abstract).[11]Fujita, S., Morikawa, Y., Shimoda, I., Nagata,S. and Shimosaka, H., Isolation system forequipment using friction pendulum bearings(1st report, Shaking tests and response analysison isolated equipment), Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech.Eng. Series C, Vol. 59, No. 557, pp. 11-16,1993 (in Japanese with English abstract).[12]Fujita, S., Yamamoto, H., Kitagawa, N. andKurabayashi, H., Research and Developmentof the Friction Pendulum Isolation Device withPoly-Curvature (Investigation of IsolationPerformance on Shake Test and ResponseAnalysis Using Vending Machine Model),Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Series C, Vol. 69,pp. 50 - 56, 2003 (in Japanese with Englishabstract).[13] Sato T., Shimomura S., Suzuki T., MikoshibaT., Terai M and Minami K., Shaking table teston sliding isolator using multi-smooth-contactswith eccentricity, Part 1 Experiment plan andpre analysis, Summaries of Technical papers ofannual meeting Architectural institute of Japan,B-2, 901-902, 2009 (in Japanese) .[14]Aoki, S., Nakanishi, Y., Nishimura, T.,Kanazawa, M., Ootaka, T. and Inagaki, M.,Reduction of seismic response of mechanicalsystem by friction type base isolation system,The Third Asian Conference on MultibodyDynamics 2006, CD-ROM A00705, 2006.

×