Topo: Aging population and AmI

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Päivi Topo, academy research fellow, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL)

Aging population, care services and needs for ambient technology.

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Topo: Aging population and AmI

  1. 1. Ageing population, care services and needs for ambient technology Päivi Topo Email: paivi.topo@thl.fi
  2. 2. Population is ageing globally 19/05/2009 Ageing population, care services and needs for ambient technology / Päivi Topo Source: World Population Ageing: 1950-2050. UN.
  3. 3. 19/05/2009 Ageing population, care services and needs for ambient technology / Päivi Topo Source: World Population Ageing: 1950-2050. UN.
  4. 4. Significant differences among people in old age <ul><li>Go Go </li></ul><ul><li>People no or minor chronic health problems </li></ul><ul><li>Slow Go </li></ul><ul><li>People with problems in health and/or functioning that cause some challenges for daily life </li></ul><ul><li>No Go </li></ul><ul><li>People with severe problems in health and functioning, dependence on others in daily life </li></ul>
  5. 5. Go Go and ambient technology <ul><li>Prevention is the main issue: </li></ul><ul><li>Nutrition & diet & weight control </li></ul><ul><li>Blood pressure </li></ul><ul><li>Sports & daily physical activity </li></ul><ul><li>Sleep </li></ul><ul><li>Social activities </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive activities </li></ul><ul><li>Support in their social activities and care responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Changes already in fucntioning because of normal ageing need to be taken into account in user requirements </li></ul>
  6. 6. Slow Go and ambient technology <ul><li>self-care of acute & chronic disease (medication, blood pressure, blood sugar etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;self-rehabilitation&quot; (physical, cognitive, psychological exercises & feed back) </li></ul><ul><li>social engangement </li></ul><ul><li>Many &quot;slow go people&quot; also care for their frail spouses or other relatives </li></ul><ul><li>Time to learn to use technology; motivation to do it depends on how necessary it is </li></ul>
  7. 7. No Go and ambient technology <ul><li>self-care of acute & severe chronic disease (medication, blood pressure, blood sugar etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;self-rehabilitation&quot; (physical, cognitive, psychological exercices & feed back) </li></ul><ul><li>social engangement </li></ul><ul><li>due dependence on help from the others communication & information delivery very important: easier to organise within family, more complex if health & social care services needed </li></ul><ul><li>cognitive problems common: difficulties in learning > easy to use is basic requirement </li></ul>
  8. 8. People with dementia as an example of Slow Go & No Go <ul><li>30 million people with dementia worldwide: by 2050, over 100 million. </li></ul><ul><li>Much of the increase will be in developing countries. </li></ul><ul><li>More than 60% of people with dementia live in developing countries, by 2040 71%. </li></ul><ul><li>The fastest growth in the elderly population is taking place in China, India, and south Asian and western Pacific. </li></ul><ul><li>In western countries people with dementia use the vast majority of services for the ageing population: their care is far more expensive than cancer treatment </li></ul>19/05/2009 Ageing population, care services and needs for ambient technology / Päivi Topo Source: Alzheimer´s Disease International
  9. 9. Prevalence of dementing illnesses in Finland by age 19/05/2009 Ageing population, care services and needs for ambient technology / Päivi Topo Age group Prevalence (%) 65-69 2,3 70-74 4,2 75-79 8,6 80-84 13,0 85-89 25,3 90+ 33,5
  10. 10. Can technology help? <ul><li>Dementia caused by Alzheimers disease and other similar disease weakens cognitive abilities widely </li></ul><ul><li>Gradually the person has problems in short term memory, in orientation, perception, counting etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Causes severe difficulties in daily life & need for 24 hour care </li></ul><ul><li>Technology has been successfully used to help family carers, social & health care personell </li></ul><ul><li>Topo P. Technology studies to meet the needs of people with dementia and their caregivers: a literature review. Journal of Applied Gerontology 2009. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Can technology help? <ul><li>Little is known about potential to directly support the person with dementia to be more indepent or to have better quality of life </li></ul><ul><li>Existing studies show promising results </li></ul><ul><li>Good solutions needed for help in maintaining abilities & cognition, to help in orientation, to improve safety at home and in compensating skills that have been lost or are in danger to be lost </li></ul><ul><li>This kind of approach can help in decreasing needs of care & cutting costs of care BUT it requires that personal help is available when needed </li></ul><ul><li>Topo P. Technology studies to meet the needs of people with dementia and their caregivers: a literature review. Journal of Applied Gerontology 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Topo P. & Östlund B. (eds): Dementia, design and technology - Time to get involved. IOS Press, 2009 (available at: www.thl.fi/bookshop) </li></ul>
  12. 12. Unnecessary disability in ageing societies <ul><li>Barrier free design & accessibility are essential </li></ul><ul><li>Technology now used to compensate problems caused by non-accessibile design of built environments </li></ul><ul><li>Service needs & needs for assistance are often caused by non-accessible environment: </li></ul><ul><li>UNNECESSARY DISABILITY </li></ul><ul><li>Ambient technology has huge potential in improving actual environments of old people towards optimal environment </li></ul>
  13. 13. Thank you!

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