Types of Microscope

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Types of Microscope

  1. 1. Microscopy - an introduction • Microscopes are instruments designed to produce magnified visual or photographic images of small objects.The microscope must accomplish three tasks 1. produce a magnified image of the specimen 2. separate the details in the image, 3. render the details visible to the human eye or camera.
  2. 2. Scale
  3. 3. MicroscopeOne or more lenses that make an enlarged image of an object.
  4. 4. Simple Microscope• Light passes through only 1 lens.• Example: magnifying glass
  5. 5. Compound Microscope• Lets light pass through an object and then through two or more lenses.
  6. 6. Stereoscopic Microscope• Gives a three dimensional view of an object. (Examples: insects and leaves)• Used for dissections
  7. 7. Electron microscopes – use a beam ofelectrons instead of a beam of light to magnify the image
  8. 8. Electron Microscopes• can achieve 3D images using electrons
  9. 9. The Scanning Electron Microscope• produces a 3-dimensional image of specimen’s surface features spider head of a butterfly
  10. 10. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)Types of specimens: -Whole organisms -Natural tissue surfaces -Exposed tissue structure A flea magnified 50 000 X What is this?
  11. 11. ScanningElectronMicroscope
  12. 12. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM).• Allows the observation of molecules within cells• Allows the magnification of objects in the order of 100, 000’s.
  13. 13. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) – Provides for detailed study of the internal ultrastructure of cells – a beam of electrons Longitudinal Cross section section of of cilium 1 µm is transmitted through cilium the specimen for a 2D viewFigure 6.4 (b) cilia on rabbit lungs
  14. 14. Transmission electron microscopeChloroplast from a tobacco leaf H1N1 virus
  15. 15. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM)• laser beam used to illuminate spots on specimen• computer compiles images created from each point to generate a 3-dimensional image• used on specimens that are too thick for a light microscope
  16. 16. A, B, C pollen grains: Scanning electron microscope D pollen grains: Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope E pollen grains: Transmission electron microscope F pollen grains: Light microscope G Mixed pollen grains (bright field light microscope, stained) H pollen grainsconfocal laser scanning microscope
  17. 17. Look at thefollowingmicrographs (apicture made by amicroscope) andtry to determinewhat the objectis!
  18. 18. DENTIST’S DRILL
  19. 19. TOILET PAPER
  20. 20. HYPODERMIC NEEDLE
  21. 21. VELCRO
  22. 22. STAPLE THROUGH PAPER
  23. 23. BLACK WIDOW SPIDER CLAW
  24. 24. PORCUPINE QUILL
  25. 25. MASCARA BRUSH
  26. 26. ANT
  27. 27. BLACK FLY
  28. 28. MOSQUITO
  29. 29. CAT FLEA
  30. 30. MITE FEEDING
  31. 31. POLLEN GRAIN
  32. 32. ANT EYE
  33. 33. APHID ON A LEAF
  34. 34. EYELASHES
  35. 35. DOG FLEA
  36. 36. H1N1 VIRUS
  37. 37. What is the difference between a… VIRUS and CELL? E.coli bacterial cells
  38. 38. VIRUS BACTERIA- can’t live on its own- must - can exist on its own live inside another cell- much smaller (20 – 400nm) - larger (1000 nm = 1μm)- none are beneficial - some can be beneficial (bacteria in gut)- no cell wall, only a protein - outer cell wall coat- cannot be killed by antibiotics - are killed by antibiotics

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