Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
IDT Reading Summary
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

IDT Reading Summary

321
views

Published on

IDT Reading Summary

IDT Reading Summary


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
321
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 24. Getting an IDT position and succeeding at it 1. Tips when getting an IDT job a. Use many job opening sources, not sticking to a job book b. Most ID positions are in business and industry c. Most high-paying ID positions are in business and industry d. Learn how businesses operate by taking a business management course e. Acquire a strong set of skills in the production of instructional media f. Acquire a strong set of design and analysis skills g. Acquire some management skills h. Don’t be discouraged if you don’t get the first job you apply for i. Don’t’ be discouraged if you don’t get the second job you apply for j. Become active in professional organizations k. Publish, don’t cherish or cling to the papers l. Don’t be dejected if your manuscript is rejected m. When preparing for a job interview, find out as much as you can about your potential employers n. Keep up with the literature in your areas of interest o. Let your professors know you are looking for a job p. Demonstrate to your professor that you do good work q. If the job doesn’t fit, revise it. Apply for jobs that interest you, even if you don’t have the exact qualifications advertised Chapter 25. Getting a job in business and industry 1. WorkMatrix available: http://gabrielleconsulting.com/workmatrix.htm/ 2. Online resources for job finding a. http://www.careeronestop.org/ b. http://www.doleta.gov/jobseekers/services.cfm/ c. http://www.jobtargetjobfinder.com/ d. http://gabrielleconsulting.com/tipstoImprovePresentations.htm/ 3. Searching for the right job 4. Landing the job interview and networking 5. Preparing for the job interview a. Tough interview questions b. Salary questions c. Environment issues
  • 2. 6. Career Enhancements a. Make a careful inventory of your assets b. Search deliberately for those opportunities that meet your personal goals c. Beware of the size of your personal debt 7. Play your career a. What are your strongest skills? b. What skills must you polish? c. What job-related tasks make you happy? d. What do you dislike doing most? Chapter 26. Professional Organizations and Publications in IDT 1. Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD): http://www.ahrd.org/ 2. American Educational Research Association (AERA): http://www.aera.net/ 3. American Society of Training and Development (ASTD): http://www.astd.org/ 4. Asia Pacific Society for computers in education (APSCE): http://www.apsce.net/ 5. Association for the advancement of computing in education (AACE): http://www.aace.org/ 6. Association for applied interactive multimedia (AAIM): http://www.aaim.org/ 7. Association for educational communications and technology (AECT): http://www.aect.org/ 8. Association for media and technology in education in Canada (AMTEC): http://www.amtec.ca/ 9. Australasian Society for computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE): http://www.ascilite.org.au/ 10. Australian Council for Computers in Education (ACCE): http://www.acce.edu.au/ 11. Australian Society for Educational Technology (ASET): http://www.aset.org.au/ 12. British Learning Association (BLA): http://www.british-learning.com/ 13. Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD): http://www.cipd.co.uk/ 14. Distance Education Association of New Zealand (DEANZ): http://www.deanz.org.nz/ 15. Educational Research Association of Singapore (ERAS): http://www.eras.org/ 16. E-learning Network: http://www.elearningnetwork.org/ 17. European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI): http://www.earli.org/ 18. Institute of IT Training: http://www.iitt.org.uk/ 19. International Board of Standards for Training, Performance and Instruction (IBSTPI): http://www.ibstpi.org/
  • 3. 20. International Forum of Educational Technology and Society: http://ifets.ieee.org/ 21. International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI): http://www.ispi.org/ 22. International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE): http://www.iste.org/ 23. International Technology Education Association (ITEA): http://www.iteaconnect.org/ 24. International Visual Literacy Association (IVLA): http://www.ivla.org/ 25. Korean Society for Educational Technology (KSET): http://www.kset.or.kr/ 26. National Association of Distance Education Organizations in South Africa: http://www.nadeosa.org.za/ 27. Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia (ODLAA): http://www.odlaa.org/ 28. SANTEC-Educational Technology and e-Learning for Development: http://www.santecnetwork.org/ 29. Society for Applied Learning Technology (SALT): http://www.salt.org/ 30. Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE): http://site.aace.org/ 31. South African Institute of Distance Education (ASIDE): http://www.saide.org.za/ 32. Publications (e-journal) a. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication: http://jcmc.indiana.edu/ b. Journal of Interactive Online Learning: http://www.ncolr.org/ c. Journal of Online Behavior: http://www.behavior.net/job/ d. Journal of Technology Education: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/ e. Journal of Technology Studies: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JOTS/ f. Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment: http://escholarship.bc.edu/jtla/ g. The Journal: http://thejournal.com/ h. Training and Development Magazine: http://www.trainingmag.com/ i. Australian Educational Computing: http://www.acce.edu.au/journal/ j. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Education: http://www.citejournal.org/ k. Educational Technology Review (ETR): http://www.aace.org/pubs/etr/ l. E-Journal of instructional science and technology(e-JIST): http://www.ascilite.org.au/ajet/e-jist/index.html m. E-learn Magazine: http://www.elearnmag.org/ n. Electronic Journal for the Integration of technology in Education (EJITE): http://ejite.isu.edu/ o. European Educational Research Journal: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/eerj/ p. Interactive Educational Multimedia (IEM): http://greav.ub.edu/iem/ q. Interactive Multimedia Electronic Journal of Computer-enhanced Learning: http://imej.wfu.edu/
  • 4. Chapter 27. Competencies for instructional design and technology 1. Instructional Designer a. Professional Foundation i. Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. (Essential) ii. Apply current research and theory to the practice of instructional design. (Advanced) iii. Update and improve one’s knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to instructional design and related fields. (Essential) iv. Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects. (Advanced) v. Identify and resolve ethical and legal implications of design in the work place. (Advanced) b. Planning and Analysis i. Conduct a needs assessment. (Essential) ii. Design a curriculum or program. (Essential) iii. Select and use a variety of techniques for determining instructional content. (Essential) iv. Identify and describe target population characteristics. (Essential) v. Analyze the characteristics of the environment. (Essential) vi. Analyze the characteristics of existing and emerging technologies and their use in an instructional environment. (Essential) vii. Reflect upon the elements of a situation before finalizing design solutions and strategies.(Essential) c. Design and Development i. Select, modify, or create a design and development model appropriate for a given project.(Advanced) ii. Select and use a variety of techniques to define and sequence the instructional content and strategies. (Essential) iii. Select or modify existing instructional materials. (Essential) iv. Develop instructional materials. (Essential) v. Design instruction that reflects an understanding of the diversity of learners and groups of learners. (Essential) vi. Evaluate and assess instruction and its impact. (Essential) d. Implementation and Management i. Plan and manage instructional design projects. (Advanced) ii. Promote collaboration, partnerships and relationships among the
  • 5. participants in a design project. (Advanced) iii. Apply business skills to managing instructional design. (Advanced) iv. Design instructional management systems. (Advanced) v. Provide for the effective implementation of instructional products and programs. (Essential) 2. Training Manager a. Professional Foundation i. Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. ii. Comply with established legal and ethical standards. iii. Maintain networks to advocate for and support the training function. iv. Update and improve professional and business knowledge, skills, and attitudes. b. Planning and Analysis i. Develop and monitor a strategic training plan. ii. Use performance analysis to improve the organization. iii. Plan and promote organizational change. c. Design and Development i. Apply instructional system design principles to training projects. ii. Use technology to enhance the training function. iii. Evaluate training and performance interventions. d. Administration i. Apply leadership skills to the training function. ii. Apply management skills to the training function. iii. Apply business skills to the training function. iv. Implement knowledge management solutions. 3. Instructor a. Professional Foundation i. Communicate effectively. ii. Update and improve one’s professional knowledge and skills. iii. Comply with established ethical and legal standards. iv. Establish and maintain professional credibility. b. Planning and Preparation i. Plan instructional methods and materials ii. Prepare for instruction. c. Instructional Methods and Strategies i. Stimulate and sustain learner motivation and engagement.
  • 6. ii. Demonstrate effective presentation skills. iii. Demonstrate effective facilitation skills. iv. Demonstrate effective questioning skills. v. Provide clarification and feedback. vi. Promote retention of knowledge and skills. vii. Promote transfer of knowledge and skills. d. Assessment and Evaluation i. Assess learning and performance. ii. Evaluate instructional effectiveness. e. Management i. Manage an environment that fosters learning and performance. ii. Manage the instructional process through the appropriate use of technology. 4. Evaluator a. Professional Foundations i. Communicate effectively in written, oral, and visual form. ii. Establish and maintain professional credibility. iii. Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills. iv. Observe ethical and legal standards. v. Demonstrate awareness of the politics of evaluation. b. Planning and Designing the Evaluation i. Develop an effective evaluation plan. ii. Develop a management plan for the evaluation. iii. Devise data collection strategies to support the evaluation questions and design. iv. Pilot test the data collection instruments and procedures. c. Implementing the Evaluation Plan i. Collect data. ii. Analyze and interpret data. iii. Disseminate and follow-up the findings and recommendations. d. Managing the Evaluation i. Monitor the management plan ii. Work effectively with personnel and stakeholders.
  • 7. 5. Code of Ethical Standard for instructional designers a. Guiding Standards: Responsibilities to Others i. Provide efficient, effective, workable, and cost-effective solutions to client problems. ii. Systematically improve human performance to accomplish valid and appropriate individual and organizational goals. iii. Facilitate individual accomplishment. iv. Help clients make informed decisions. v. Inform others of potential ethical violations and conflicts of interest. vi. Educate clients in matters of instructional design and performance improvement. b. Guiding Standards: Social Mandates i. Support humane, socially responsible goals and activities for individuals and organizations. ii. Make professional decisions based upon moral and ethical positions on societal issues. iii. Consider the impact of planned interventions upon individuals, organizations, and the society as a whole. c. Guiding Standards: Respecting the Rights of Others i. Protect the privacy, candidness, and confidentiality of client and colleague information and communication. ii. Adhere to intellectual property regulations. iii. Do not use client or colleague information for personal gain. iv. Do not represent the ideas or work of others as one's own. v. Do not make false claims about others. vi. Do not discriminate in actions related to hiring, retention, and advancement. d. Guiding Standards: Professional Practice i. Be honest and fair in all facets of one's work. ii. Share skills and knowledge with other professionals. iii. Recognize the contributions of others. iv. Support and aid colleagues. v. Commit time and effort to the development of the profession. vi. Withdraw from clients who do not act ethically or when there is a conflict of interest.
  • 8. 6. Code of Ethical Standard for training managers a. Guiding Standards: Responsibilities to the Organization i. Provide efficient, effective, workable, and cost-effective solutions that advance organizational performance goals. ii. Initiate and collaborate in organizational decision-making. iii. Educate the organization in matters of instructional design and performance improvement. iv. Inform the organization of potential conflicts of interest, and ethical, legal, and due process violations. v. Protect the privacy, candor, and confidentiality of information and communication of the organization and its members. vi. Do not misuse organizational information for personal gain. b. Guiding Standards: Responsibilities to Others i. Be honest and fair in interactions with others. ii. Treat others with dignity and respect. iii. Facilitate individual accomplishment. iv. Do not engage in exploitative relationships. v. Do not discriminate unfairly in actions related to hiring, retention, salary, adjustments and promotion. vi. Do not represent the ideas or work of others as one's own. vii. Do not make false or deceptive claims about self, others, or the work of the training function. c. Guiding Standards: Responsibilities to the Profession i. Seek and acknowledge the contributions of others. ii. Aid and be supportive of colleagues. iii. Commit time and effort to the development of the profession. iv. Promote the enforcement of ethical standards. d. Guiding Standards: Responsibility to Society. i. Support humane, socially responsible goals and projects for the organization. ii. Ensure that training products and procedures reflect moral and ethical positions on societal issues. iii. Consider the consequences of proposed solutions upon individuals, organizations, and the society as a whole. 7. Two primary trends
  • 9. a. Integration of the competencies within ID models: Incorporating competencies in ID models b. Specialization within the IDT field: the development of specialties with the IDT field 8. Two issues a. The lack of common job and program titles for the IDT field b. The professional certification of the field