Augmented Reality Presentation in ICISTS 2011

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Augmented reality icists 2011 by Mark Billinghurst

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Augmented Reality Presentation in ICISTS 2011

  1. 1. Going OutResearch in Mobile Augmented Reality Mark Billinghurst HIT Lab NZ University of Canterbury
  2. 2. Augmented Reality (Azuma 97)  Combines Real and Virtual Images - Both can be seen at the same time  Interactive in real-time - The virtual content can be interacted with  Registered in 3D - Virtual objects appear fixed in space
  3. 3. 1999: AR Face to Face Collaboration
  4. 4. Siggraph 99 Demo
  5. 5. 1998: SGI O2 2008: Nokia N95$5,000 $500CPU: 300 Mhz CPU: 332 MhzHDD; 9GB HDD; 8GBRAM: 512 mb RAM: 128 mbCamera: VGA 30fps Camera: VGA 30 fpsGraphics:500K poly/sec Graphics:2m poly/sec
  6. 6. Evolution of Mobile AR Camera phone Camera phone - Thin client ARWearable Wearable ARComputers Camera phone - Self contained AR PDAs Handheld -Thin client AR AR Displays PDAs -Self contained AR 1995 1997 2001 2003 2004
  7. 7. Mobile Phone AR Mobile Phones  camera  processor  display AR on Mobile Phones  Simple graphics  Optimized computer vision  Collaborative Interaction
  8. 8. Collaborative AR AR Tennis  Two user game  Audio + haptic feedback  Bluetooth messaging
  9. 9. AR Tennis
  10. 10. Mobile AR Txt message to download AR application (200K) See virtual content popping out of real paper advert Tested May 2007 by Saatchi and Saatchi
  11. 11. Mobile AR: Touring Machine (1997) University of Columbia  Feiner, MacIntyre, Höllerer, Webster Combines  See through head mounted display  GPS tracking  Orientation sensor  Backpack PC (custom)  Tablet input
  12. 12. MARS View Virtual tags overlaid on the real world “Information in place”
  13. 13. 2008 - Location Aware Phones Motorola Droid Nokia Navigator
  14. 14. Real World Information Overlay Tag real world locations  GPS + Compass input  Overlay graphics data on live video Applications  Travel guide, Advertising, etc Eg: Mobilizy Wikitude  Android based, Public API released Other companies  Layar, AcrossAir, Tochnidot, RobotVision, etc
  15. 15. Layar – www.layar.comiPhone, Android> 2 million downloads 1500+ information layers
  16. 16. HIT Lab NZ Outdoor AR Platform Cross platform  Android, iPhone 3D onsite visualization  Intuitive user interface Positions content in space  Camera, GPS, compass Client/Server software architecture Targeting museum guide/outdoor site applications
  17. 17. Prototype: Earthquake Reconstruction  See past, present and future building designs  Earthquake survivor stories shown on map view  Collect user comments  Android platform
  18. 18. Benefits of Mobile AR Making the invisible visible  Geo-located services/information Ease interaction with virtual content  Tangible/physical interaction Reduce cognitive load  Intuitive spatial organization of information
  19. 19. Mobile AR Today Smart Phones (450+ million in 2011)  Cameras, GPS, Compass, Gyroscope Sensors  Fast CPU, GPU chips Free developer kits  Layar,Junaio, outdoor SDKs  Qualcomm QCAR vision tracking SDK User-generated content  Flickr, Sketch-up, YouTube, Twitter, etc
  20. 20. $784 million USD in 2014
  21. 21. Looking to the Future
  22. 22. Directions for Future Research Enabling Technologies  Displays, tracking, information filtering User Experience  Remove social boundaries, increasing ease of use Crossing Boundaries  AR + other interface metaphors Social Augmented Reality  AR 2.0, AR everywhere
  23. 23. Tri-corder Problem Handheld AR  Social boundaries  Not always available
  24. 24. Future Displays Always on, unobtrusive
  25. 25. Contact Lens Display Babak Parviz  University Washington MEMS components  Transparent elements  Micro-sensors Challenges  Miniaturization  Assembly  Eye-safe
  26. 26. AR User Experience
  27. 27. Crossing Boundaries Jun Rekimoto, Sony CSL
  28. 28. Invisible Interfaces Jun Rekimoto, Sony CSL
  29. 29. The MagicBookReality Augmented Augmented Virtuality Reality (AR) Virtuality (AV)
  30. 30. ubiHome @ GIST Media services Light service MR window ubiTrack Where/When Tag-it ubiKey ubiHome Who/What/What/When/How When/How PDA Couch Sensor Door Sensor Who/What/When/How When/How When/How
  31. 31. CAMAR - GIST(CAMAR: Context-Aware Mobile Augmented Reality)
  32. 32. Ubiquitous AR (GIST, Korea) How does your AR device work with other devices? How is content delivered?
  33. 33. Ubiquitous UbiComp Ubi AR Ubi VRWeiser Mobile AR Desktop AR VR Terminal Reality Virtual Reality Milgram From: Joe Newman
  34. 34. MassiveMulti User Ubiquitous TerminalSingle User Reality VR
  35. 35. Multi-user AR Interfaces 1996 1999 2004 2018 2 users 4 users 8 users ?? users 10 years of Collaborative AR – 2 to 8 users  cf MSN Chat 29m, Skype 17m, Second Life 50K Mobile/handheld AR scales to high number of users  New applications, infrastructure, content distribution…
  36. 36. Social Augmented Reality Public and private annotations everywhere
  37. 37. BASIC VIEW
  38. 38. PERSONAL VIEW
  39. 39. Augmented Reality 2.0 Infrastructure
  40. 40. Social Implications Privacy  Who can see my information? Reliability (Wikipedia effect)  How truthful is the information? Just in time education  Information without learning? Attention Becomes a Valuable Commodity  Hyperconnectivity = time slicing
  41. 41. Conclusions• Mobile AR enhances interaction with real world• Many possible applications/commercial possibilities• Important research problems need to be solved –Enabling Technologies –Experience Design –Crossing Boundaries –Social Augmented Reality
  42. 42. More Information• Mark Billinghurst – mark.billinghurst@hitlabnz.org• Website – www.hitlabnz.org

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