Key Findings and Lessons Learned from theAsia-Pacific Multi-stakeholder Consultation                 on Rio+20            ...
International Forum for Sustainable Asia and the Pacific (ISAP2011)~ New Asia-Pacific Perspectives towards Rio+20: Implica...
Key points   ‘Resilience’ is key for SD   Green economy is an interim milestone for SD.   Institutional Framework for S...
Sustainable and Resilient Society (1)   Why Resilience?     A resilient society has adaptive capacity and robustness    ...
Sustainable and Resilient Society (2)Approaches to a Sustainable and Resilient Society   Multi-stakeholder and Multi-leve...
Green Economy (1)Why green economy?Overcome vulnerability caused by excessive pursuit of economic efficiency Economic effi...
Green Economy (2) Key Approaches and RoadmapKey Approaches                   Short-term   Mid-term        Long-termGreen  ...
IFSD (1)Updating IFSD to respond to current and future challengesContext   Present institutional framework inadequate to ...
IFSD (2) Reform phases and content              Short /Medium Term (-2020)                     Long Term (-2050)Global    ...
Thank you very much for your attention.                                   http://www.iges.or.jp/    IGES | http://www.iges...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

IGES' presentation at the Asia-Pacific Regional Preparatory Meeting for Rio+20: "Key Findings and Lessons Learned from the Asia-Pacific Multi-stakeholder Consultation on Rio+20"

2,364 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,364
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,569
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

IGES' presentation at the Asia-Pacific Regional Preparatory Meeting for Rio+20: "Key Findings and Lessons Learned from the Asia-Pacific Multi-stakeholder Consultation on Rio+20"

  1. 1. Key Findings and Lessons Learned from theAsia-Pacific Multi-stakeholder Consultation on Rio+20 Asia-Pacific Regional Preparatory Meeting for Rio+20 19-20 October 2011, Seoul, Republic of Korea Hironori Hamanaka Chair, Board of Directors Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES)
  2. 2. International Forum for Sustainable Asia and the Pacific (ISAP2011)~ New Asia-Pacific Perspectives towards Rio+20: Implications of the East Japan Disasters~ The 3rd ISAP: 26-27 July 2011, Yokohama, Japan. Co-organized by IGES and UNU-IAS. Collaborators: UNESCAP, UNEP-ROAP, and ADB. Participants: 850 people. ISAP2011 is designated as the Asia-Pacific Multi-stakeholder Consultation on Rio+20 Themes: (1) Implications of the recent triple disaster in Eastern Japan. (2) Green Economy in the Context of Sustainable Development and Poverty Eradication (3) Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development (IFSD) The outcome and elaborated messages will be submitted as input from Asia and the Pacific to UNDESA for the compilation document as a basis of zero-draft of the outcome document of Rio+20 on 1 November 2011. IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 2
  3. 3. Key points ‘Resilience’ is key for SD Green economy is an interim milestone for SD. Institutional Framework for Sustainable Development (IFSD) is necessary condition for SD. IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 3
  4. 4. Sustainable and Resilient Society (1) Why Resilience?  A resilient society has adaptive capacity and robustness  Handle shocks while maintaining functionality  Grow stronger over time. • Extreme events can damage past achievements • Delay progress on sustainable development. Greater emphasis in policy and research to resilience and vulnerability in sustainable development. Sustainable Development Pathway Social,Economic, and Resilience enablesEnvironmental a quick return Condition Disruption from shock due to vulnerability Time IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 4
  5. 5. Sustainable and Resilient Society (2)Approaches to a Sustainable and Resilient Society Multi-stakeholder and Multi-level Governance with better participation and pro-poor, vulnerable approach Financial Schemes for risk mitigation and smooth recovery Decentralised and Diversified Infrastructure of energy, water, transportation, etc. - safe, secure and green energy systems Mitigation & Decentralized & Recovery Finance Diversified Infrastructure Market Circulation Production Multi-stakeholder Multi-level Government Governance Building Regulation/ Redistribution infrastructure Conservation Human Physical Natural Capital Capital Capital IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 5
  6. 6. Green Economy (1)Why green economy?Overcome vulnerability caused by excessive pursuit of economic efficiency Economic efficiency Environmental Social Economic Profit maximisation vulnerability vulnerability vulnerability Competitiveness Mass consumption & Poverty & Price volatility of income gaps natural resources production Ecosystem Worsened labour degradation conditions & natural disastersKey aspects Green investment Job creation International policy coordination Precautionary principle IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 6
  7. 7. Green Economy (2) Key Approaches and RoadmapKey Approaches Short-term Mid-term Long-termGreen Ecological Regional Multilateral NAMAs in Low-carboninvestment in tax reform energy market agreement on Non-Annex I economyrenewable e.g. carbon harmonisation adjustment countriesenergy: tax measures Int’l fund for InnovativeChange in Analytical tools reduction 3R policies sustainableconsumption to identify policies Sustainable & top-runner resourcepatterns effective policy e.g. natural consumption approach management interventions resource tax, & production resource capSustainable Firmagriculture Accurate methodology Ecologicaland green Enlargement valuation decision of PES on green Sustainable useproduction techniques accounting makingsupply chain of ecosystem services IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 7
  8. 8. IFSD (1)Updating IFSD to respond to current and future challengesContext Present institutional framework inadequate to meet current and future challenges and development goals SD agenda overshadowed by foreign policy concerns; – Although global commons management and transboundary issues increasingly are of national level interestInterventions Strengthen integration and mainstreaming of SD at all levels of governance Increase capacity building, tech. transfer, funding – Close persistent implementation gapKey Principles/Directions - Multilevel governance Phased Approach - Multistakeholder participation (short, medium and long term ) - Integration among 3 SD dimensions and others - Strengthen environmental dimension of SD - Subsidiarity IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 8
  9. 9. IFSD (2) Reform phases and content Short /Medium Term (-2020) Long Term (-2050)Global • Establish SD Council (coordination w/ • Enhance SD Council’s powersIFSD BWI, IFIs, etc. and overseeing of (budgetary, regulatory) budgeting within UN) • UN Charter amendment • High Commissioner for SD • Concrete SD Goals harmonised w/ MDGs • Harmonise climate, energy w/ SD • Global Aarhus Convention • Integrate SD principles w/ global regulatory frameworkIEG/UNEP • 1) Universal membership of Governing • Stronger regulatory power of Council; 2) WEO environmental governance actors • MEA synergy • MEA harmonisationRegional • Strengthen regional institutions & • Regional organisations coordination among them (Asia Environment Organisation) • Environmental information exchange, • Reporting between levels capacity development, and support for • Cooperation on implementation funding applicationNational & • National SD focal points & coordinating • Formalise participation of localSubnational bodies at apex of government governments and stakeholders in • Networking of cities regional & global organisations • Reporting/ coordinating between levels • Reporting/ coordinating between levels IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 9
  10. 10. Thank you very much for your attention. http://www.iges.or.jp/ IGES | http://www.iges.or.jp 10

×