Science Fair Investigatory Project Proposal

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Science Fair Investigatory Project Proposal

  1. 1. Vitamin C Content Group 3
  2. 2. Do different types of orange juice contain the same amount of vitamin C?
  3. 3. If the factors of determining the vitamin c (the plant's growing conditions, method of processing, storage conditions, and exposure to heat, light or metals) are different, the vitamin C content will differ.
  4. 4. Objectives: 1. To measure and compare the Vitamin C content in a variety of food samples. 2. To determine the effect of various factors on Vitamin C concentration.
  5. 5. Vitamin C is best known to be found in citrus fruits. It maintains collagen, helps in healing of wounds and repair of tissues, helps in forming red blood cells. It should be in our bodies as much as possible. Since vitamin C should be ingested as much as possible, we would need to be able to get the most vitamin C in one day. :)
  6. 6. <ul><li>1. Pour 15 mL of the vitamin C indicator into a 50-mL flask or medicine cup. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Using a clean medicine dropper, add a drop of one of the orange juice samples to the indicator in the flask. Gently swirl the liquids to mix. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Continue to add orange juice, drop by drop, until the indicator changes from blue to colorless. </li></ul><ul><li>Note: Be sure to swirl after each drop is added. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Observe and count the number of drops of orange juice you needed to add to the indicator to cause it to lose all of its color. Juices low in vitamin C will begin to dilute the indicator. The indicator will start to take on the color of the juice. If this occurs, indicate that no satisfactory end point was reached. Record the number of drops added in the chart on your data sheet. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>5. Repeat the above steps for each orange juice sample being tested. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Test each juice three times and calculate the average number of drops (to the nearest tenth) required to change the indicator. </li></ul>
  8. 8. I See! Vitamin C! Mary Colvard http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/ATG/data/released/0490-MaryColvard/index.php
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