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Science Education: Themes for the Next 50 Years

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Anthony Townsend presentation to the MathScience Innovation Center in Richmond, VA, MAy 1, 2009

Anthony Townsend presentation to the MathScience Innovation Center in Richmond, VA, MAy 1, 2009

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  • We’re seeing an entire industry grow Biotechnology has not been a money maker. Gary pisano at harvard points out, its been a profitless business for the better part of its four decades. If you exclude Amgen, the biggest success it looks even worse.But we see the foundations of what this poster – created by a high critical watchdog group in Europe – calls “SYNDUSTRY”Include big pharma and chemical giants, but also starttups and a global industry of DNA foundries that are producing “designer DNA”
  • Biological ideas are also going to work their way into many other fields – economic and public policyLess mechanistic, more ecological modelsstart to dominate our science-informed problem solving strategies and philosophies
  • Tying this back to intentioanl biologyKnome in Cambridge, MA for $100,000 will sequence your individual genome
  • Going forward – the science of metabolomics seeks to understand the way our bodies process the molecules that give us energy, remove waste and perform other useful life-sustaining functions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Science Education:Themes for the Next 50 Years
      Anthony Townsend IResearch Director
      INSTITUTE FOR THE FUTUREMathScience Innovation Forum
      Richmond, Virginia
      May 1, 2009
      © 2006, 2009 Institute for the Future. All rights reserved.
    • 2. 2
      where we started
    • 3. 3
      map 1.0
    • 4. 4
      map 2.0
    • 5. 5
      S&T horizon map: 2005–2055
      insert final S&T map
    • 6. Themes for the Next 50 Years
      Mathematical World
      Intentional Biology
      Transdisciplinarity
      The Extended Self
      Science In Place
      6
    • 7. 7
      mathematical world
    • 8. 8
      three waves of digital technology
      Source: Institute for the Future
    • 9. 9
      explosionof sensors
    • 10. 10
      zillionics
      Unrelenting rivers of sensory data will flow day and night from zillions of sources.
      —Kevin Kelly
    • 11. 11
      decoding patterns
    • 12. 12
      math becomes invisible
      Painting by Andreas Gursky, 99 Cent, 1999
      In 2050, 99% of computational cycles will be devoted to one task—grinding combinatorics.
      –Jim Herriot, the Bios Group
    • 13. 13
      simulation: new literacy
      Visuals
      Multimedia
      Tactile
      Auditory
    • 14. 14
      simulation: enterprise
    • 15. 15
      sensemaking
      the next curve:
      Source: Institute for the Future
    • 16. 16
      intentional biology
    • 17. 17
      mother nature has a collaborator
    • 18. 18
      gene jockeying
      The costs of DNA sequencing and synthesizing are dropping
      Source: Carlson, Rob. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science Volume 1, Number 3, August 2003.
    • 19. 19
      programmable life
    • 20. 20
      synthetic biology
    • 21.
    • 22. 22
      nature’s nanotech
      Biology is the nanotechnology
      that works.
      —Tom Knight, MIT
    • 23. 23
      nanobiotechnology
      Source: Ron Fearing, UC Berkeley
    • 24. 24
      personalized medicine
    • 25.
    • 26. 26
      transdisciplinarity
    • 27. 27
      Source: http://www.hent.org/hent/hentnews/trans3.gif
      transdisciplinarity
    • 28. 28
      democratized innovation
    • 29. 29
      from cloistered specialists to global networks of innovation
      grid physics network
    • 30. 30
      cultivating amateurs
    • 31. 31
      new publishing forums
    • 32. 32
      extended self
    • 33. 33
      hacking our biology
      Ritalin abuse among u.s. teens, 2004
      Source: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research
    • 34. 34
      hacking our biology
    • 35. personal genome analysis
      35
    • 36. metabolomics
      36
    • 37. 37
      embracing our cyborg selves
      Microsoft’s SenseCam
    • 38. 38
      jacking in
    • 39. 39
      extra sensory perception
      magnetic fingers
    • 40. 40
      the quantifed self
    • 41. 41
      science in place
    • 42. 42
      science 2.0: research meets the social web
    • 43. 43
      lightweight innovation
      To…
      From…
      Internal
      Centralized
      Corporate Labs
      43
    • 49. 44
      innovation and learning happen anywhere
    • 50. 45
      but more of it is ad hoc f2f
      BioBarCamp @ IFTF
    • 51. 46
      future spaces: co-working
      La Cantine, Paris
    • 52. 47
      future spaces: disposable labs
    • 53. 48
      future spaces: MIT’s Stata Center
    • 54. 49
      K-12 in the regional knowledge ecosystem
    • 55. Key Themes for the Next 50 Years
      Mathematical World
      Intentional Biology
      Transdisciplinarity
      The Extended Self
      Science In Place
      Full map and report available at
      http://tinyurl.com/iftf50
      50

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