Science Education: Themes for the Next 50 Years

891 views
755 views

Published on

Anthony Townsend presentation to the MathScience Innovation Center in Richmond, VA, MAy 1, 2009

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
891
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • We’re seeing an entire industry grow Biotechnology has not been a money maker. Gary pisano at harvard points out, its been a profitless business for the better part of its four decades. If you exclude Amgen, the biggest success it looks even worse.But we see the foundations of what this poster – created by a high critical watchdog group in Europe – calls “SYNDUSTRY”Include big pharma and chemical giants, but also starttups and a global industry of DNA foundries that are producing “designer DNA”
  • Biological ideas are also going to work their way into many other fields – economic and public policyLess mechanistic, more ecological modelsstart to dominate our science-informed problem solving strategies and philosophies
  • Tying this back to intentioanl biologyKnome in Cambridge, MA for $100,000 will sequence your individual genome
  • Going forward – the science of metabolomics seeks to understand the way our bodies process the molecules that give us energy, remove waste and perform other useful life-sustaining functions.
  • Science Education: Themes for the Next 50 Years

    1. 1. Science Education:Themes for the Next 50 Years<br />Anthony Townsend IResearch Director<br />INSTITUTE FOR THE FUTUREMathScience Innovation Forum<br />Richmond, Virginia<br />May 1, 2009<br />© 2006, 2009 Institute for the Future. All rights reserved.<br />
    2. 2. 2<br />where we started<br />
    3. 3. 3<br />map 1.0<br />
    4. 4. 4<br />map 2.0<br />
    5. 5. 5<br />S&T horizon map: 2005–2055<br />insert final S&T map <br />
    6. 6. Themes for the Next 50 Years <br />Mathematical World<br />Intentional Biology<br />Transdisciplinarity<br />The Extended Self<br />Science In Place<br />6<br />
    7. 7. 7<br />mathematical world<br />
    8. 8. 8<br />three waves of digital technology<br />Source: Institute for the Future<br />
    9. 9. 9<br />explosionof sensors<br />
    10. 10. 10<br />zillionics<br />Unrelenting rivers of sensory data will flow day and night from zillions of sources.<br />—Kevin Kelly<br />
    11. 11. 11<br />decoding patterns<br />
    12. 12. 12<br />math becomes invisible<br />Painting by Andreas Gursky, 99 Cent, 1999<br />In 2050, 99% of computational cycles will be devoted to one task—grinding combinatorics.<br />–Jim Herriot, the Bios Group<br />
    13. 13. 13<br />simulation: new literacy<br />Visuals<br />Multimedia<br />Tactile<br />Auditory<br />
    14. 14. 14<br />simulation: enterprise<br />
    15. 15. 15<br />sensemaking<br />the next curve:<br />Source: Institute for the Future<br />
    16. 16. 16<br />intentional biology<br />
    17. 17. 17<br />mother nature has a collaborator<br />
    18. 18. 18<br />gene jockeying<br />The costs of DNA sequencing and synthesizing are dropping<br />Source: Carlson, Rob. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science Volume 1, Number 3, August 2003.<br />
    19. 19. 19<br />programmable life<br />
    20. 20. 20<br />synthetic biology<br />
    21. 21.
    22. 22. 22<br />nature’s nanotech<br />Biology is the nanotechnology<br />that works.<br />—Tom Knight, MIT<br />
    23. 23. 23<br />nanobiotechnology<br />Source: Ron Fearing, UC Berkeley<br />
    24. 24. 24<br />personalized medicine<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26. 26<br />transdisciplinarity<br />
    27. 27. 27<br />Source: http://www.hent.org/hent/hentnews/trans3.gif<br />transdisciplinarity<br />
    28. 28. 28<br />democratized innovation<br />
    29. 29. 29<br />from cloistered specialists to global networks of innovation<br />grid physics network<br />
    30. 30. 30<br />cultivating amateurs<br />
    31. 31. 31<br />new publishing forums<br />
    32. 32. 32<br />extended self<br />
    33. 33. 33<br />hacking our biology<br />Ritalin abuse among u.s. teens, 2004<br />Source: University of Michigan Institute for Social Research<br />
    34. 34. 34<br />hacking our biology<br />
    35. 35. personal genome analysis<br />35<br />
    36. 36. metabolomics<br />36<br />
    37. 37. 37<br />embracing our cyborg selves<br />Microsoft’s SenseCam<br />
    38. 38. 38<br />jacking in<br />
    39. 39. 39<br />extra sensory perception<br />magnetic fingers<br />
    40. 40. 40<br />the quantifed self<br />
    41. 41. 41<br />science in place<br />
    42. 42. 42<br />science 2.0: research meets the social web<br />
    43. 43. 43<br />lightweight innovation<br />To…<br /><ul><li>Venture funds & start-ups
    44. 44. Knowledge spot markets
    45. 45. Contract labs
    46. 46. IP shops
    47. 47. Consumer co-creation
    48. 48. & more…</li></ul>From…<br />Internal<br />Centralized<br />Corporate Labs<br />43<br />
    49. 49. 44<br />innovation and learning happen anywhere<br />
    50. 50. 45<br /> but more of it is ad hoc f2f<br />BioBarCamp @ IFTF<br />
    51. 51. 46<br />future spaces: co-working<br />La Cantine, Paris<br />
    52. 52. 47<br />future spaces: disposable labs<br />
    53. 53. 48<br /> future spaces: MIT’s Stata Center<br />
    54. 54. 49<br />K-12 in the regional knowledge ecosystem<br />
    55. 55. Key Themes for the Next 50 Years <br />Mathematical World<br />Intentional Biology<br />Transdisciplinarity<br />The Extended Self<br />Science In Place<br />Full map and report available at <br />http://tinyurl.com/iftf50<br />50<br />

    ×