• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,401
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. As GNP increases the cost of FFE declines  compared to costs of education
  • 2. Wh t l d thi fi i l ? What else does this figure imply? yp g g ; g ( Country pattern is analogous to Engle’s law; food budget (costs)  ) increase very little over GNP range but other schooling  expenditures do.  p p Is the comparison to education expenditures fair?  If it is a social  protection expenditure then should it not be compared to levels  and GNP shares of other safety nets? 4 5 y p y( y p y) $40‐50 a year per beneficiary (maybe twice that per family) is not  large compared to many CCTs But CCTS are generally well targeted Also, if one is comparing to CCTs then one has to ask, what is the  Also  if one is comparing to CCTs then one has to ask  what is the  cost per monitored effect  of meals compared to alternatives.   Uganda  and Burkina Faso comparisons of THR and meals are  some of the few examples of comparative  studies of FFE.   some of the few examples of comparative  studies of FFE   
  • 3. C FFE b t t d? Can FFE be targeted? It is difficult to target meals within a grade; it is possible to target  grades within a program but seldom is this done Possible to have a sliding scale for payments but again this is not  often done Geographic targeting is clearly possible.   Take home rations have been targeted in a number of countries  ( (Bangladesh is a well studied example).  This is most often done  g p ) with a take home top off or addition to meal programs and is  often targeted to girls.  , , y [ ] g Overall, however, tendency for meals to be [de facto] regressive,  , partially on the basis of accessibility and capacity.   Remote rural  schools are less likely to have kitchen facilities. p p p y y Laos present an example of capacity:  only one‐half to two‐thirds of  eligible villages report participating in FFE
  • 4. Two very different ways to interpret Laos  evidence  Should an ineffectively targeted (but capped) program be  expanded on the grounds that new entrants will be poorer  on average?   This is the rationale behind dynamic or  marginal targeting. In the 1980s USAID commissioned a prominent school  feeding expert to review its program in a set of countries.   The consultant concluded that none of the countries  delivered programs the 180‐200 days planned, but if they  had, various favorable outcomes would have been reached Rather than redouble its efforts to expand coverage, USAID  decided that capacity was not there and scaled back its  programs
  • 5. Concluding Points p Most FFE have an impact of school attendance or  enrollment; harder to find impacts on  performance (in part due to time frame).   No clear dominance of types of programs in regards  to these impacts.  Economics of programs then  hinge on costs of delivery and sustainability. hi     t   f d li   d  t i bilit Mix of snacks (generally 1/3 cost of meals and can be  produced and fortified locall ) and THR seem to  locally) and THR seem to  have promise.