From Concepts to RealitiesPromising nanotech applications for agriculture, food and water safety in developing countries  ...
Nanotechnology applications? Nanotechnology  •   R&D that involves measuring and manipulating matter at      the atomic, ...
Examples of promising nanotech               applications Agricultural production  •   Better management and stewardship ...
• Food safety and                       • Water safety        nutrition• Enhanced barriers to microbial     • Improved fil...
Key challenges ahead1. R & D investment for the poor2. Cost and access to nano applications3. Risk and regulatory issues  ...
For more information: www.ifpri.org
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From Concepts to Realities -- Promising Nanotech Applications for Agriculture, Food & Water Safety in Developing Countries

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IFPRI Policy Seminar "From Concepts to Realities Promising nanotech applications for agriculture, food and water safety in developing countries" by Guillaume Gruere on 14 November 2011

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From Concepts to Realities -- Promising Nanotech Applications for Agriculture, Food & Water Safety in Developing Countries

  1. 1. From Concepts to RealitiesPromising nanotech applications for agriculture, food and water safety in developing countries Guillaume Gruere Environment and Production Technology Division, IFPRI
  2. 2. Nanotechnology applications? Nanotechnology • R&D that involves measuring and manipulating matter at the atomic, molecular and supramolecular level (1-100nm). • Specific properties different from their bulk counterparts. Why discussing nanotech applications? − Fancy concepts, significant investments & promises, but what is actually happening? − International debate on nano-governance could last decades but there is an opportunity cost for the poor • Should all nanotech applications be treated the same ? o High potential/low-risk applications
  3. 3. Examples of promising nanotech applications Agricultural production • Better management and stewardship of agricultural inputs (nanoherbicides, nanosensors) • Improved animal production (nanofeed additives) • Improved crop production (nanofertilizers and nanoporous membranes to retain soil moisture and reduce the effects of drought)
  4. 4. • Food safety and • Water safety nutrition• Enhanced barriers to microbial • Improved filtrationcontamination or spoilage mechanisms to remove water(nanoclays, nanofilms, etc) pathogens or contaminants (nanotube membranes),• Detection of foodbornepathogens (nanosensors in • Improved detoxification ofpackaging/processing) harmful pollutants (zero valent iron nanoparticles) and remediation• Nano-based veterinary (nanoparticle filters)treatments (nanoclays to decreaseaflatoxin effects in animals, nanoveterinary drugs)• Detection of pesticides, heavymetals or other chemicalcontaminants
  5. 5. Key challenges ahead1. R & D investment for the poor2. Cost and access to nano applications3. Risk and regulatory issues • Setting balanced approaches to regulation • Monitoring risk perception and the acceptance of nanotech • Anticipating and managing market risks
  6. 6. For more information: www.ifpri.org

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