Prof. Rohan Rajapakse      Dr. Disna RatnasekaraActing Vice Chairman,   Head/ Dept. of AgriculturalUniversity GrantsCommis...
The relation ship between agriculture andhealth may seen intuitive and simple growmore crops and people will have more foo...
The idea of linking food security and nutritioncomponents into agriculture is not new.Effective approaches for incorporati...
Many developing countries are enthusiasticabout the possibility of achieving nutritiongoals through the agricultural secto...
d. Making available agricultural credit to male   and female producers.e. Expansion of food crop production.These programm...
Increasing income at the household level,however, is not sufficient to alleviatemalnutrition.Whether increased income tran...
The key to tacking these problems lies in betterintegration of health and agriculturalinterventions and policy.For example...
The purpose of agriculture is not just togrow crops and livestock, but to growhealthy, well-nourished people.Farmers produ...
There is growing evidence of increasingmalnutrition in Sri Lanka. The rising prices offood are likely to aggravate this si...
Agricultural growth could contribute toreduction of poverty, hunger and malnutrition.Poverty and food insecurity are large...
3. The problems of marketing of agricultural   produce have to be resolved by developing   storage and milling capacity, p...
Targeted food price subsidies are a popularand common type of intervention aimed atincreasing food consumption of poorhous...
 Provide credit to women in rural areas where  agricultural activities are developed. Target agricultural extension acti...
There has been a lack of focus on agriculturalbiodiversity and on food systems as a whole.Our results suggest that farmer-...
Leveraging agriculture, nutrition and health: Some cases from Sri Lanka
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Leveraging agriculture, nutrition and health: Some cases from Sri Lanka

1,374 views
1,297 views

Published on

2020 Conference on "Leveraging Agriculture for Improving Nutrition and Health"
February 12, 2011
Credit: Prof. Rajapaske Rohan

Published in: Education, Travel, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,374
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Leveraging agriculture, nutrition and health: Some cases from Sri Lanka

  1. 1. Prof. Rohan Rajapakse Dr. Disna RatnasekaraActing Vice Chairman, Head/ Dept. of AgriculturalUniversity GrantsCommission Biology,Colombo, Faculty of Agriculture,Sri Lanka. University of Ruhuna,
  2. 2. The relation ship between agriculture andhealth may seen intuitive and simple growmore crops and people will have more food andlive healthier lives. But because agriculture andhealth policies are rarely coordinated, thereality is far more complex.Most of the poor in Sri Lanka are farmers andfarm workers, who depend on agriculture fortheir livelihoods, including the income neededto buy health services. Threats to agriculturebecome threats to health.
  3. 3. The idea of linking food security and nutritioncomponents into agriculture is not new.Effective approaches for incorporatingnutrition goals into agriculture and ruraldevelopment projects were recognized asnecessary a decade ago, but effectiveapproaches for doing so in anoperationally acceptable way were notavailable.
  4. 4. Many developing countries are enthusiasticabout the possibility of achieving nutritiongoals through the agricultural sector.Research on above in Sri Lanka have identifiedcertain types of agricultural programmes thatwere more successful than others in achievingfood security and nutrition objectives. Theseinclude;a. Expansion of cash crop production.b. Introduction of hybrid varieties.c. Creation of effective and appropriate extension services.
  5. 5. d. Making available agricultural credit to male and female producers.e. Expansion of food crop production.These programmes were able to reach thelowest income households, which were oftenthe households most at risk nutritionally.It is clear from available studies that ashousehold income is increased, there is animprovement in both the quality and quantityof the household’s diet.
  6. 6. Increasing income at the household level,however, is not sufficient to alleviatemalnutrition.Whether increased income translates intoimproved household and individual nutritiondepends on a variety of factors including.How much of the increase is spent onnutritious food, how the increased quantityand quality of food is distributed among familymembers, and what the health and hygienelevels are of individual family members.
  7. 7. The key to tacking these problems lies in betterintegration of health and agriculturalinterventions and policy.For example, irrigation projects that increaseyields may unintentionally encourage diseasessuch as malaria or schistosomiasis.In Sri Lanka, intensification projects that haveintroduced both irrigation and pig productionhave created ideal conditions for Japaneseencephalitis, whose mosquito vectors breed inditches and use pigs as alternative hosts.
  8. 8. The purpose of agriculture is not just togrow crops and livestock, but to growhealthy, well-nourished people.Farmers produce a wide range of goods,including one of their ultimate tasks isto produce food of sufficient quantity tofeed all.
  9. 9. There is growing evidence of increasingmalnutrition in Sri Lanka. The rising prices offood are likely to aggravate this situation,especially in households that do not producefood.Although the country does not have seriousfood shortages malnutrition affects nearlyone-third of children and one quarter ofwomen.
  10. 10. Agricultural growth could contribute toreduction of poverty, hunger and malnutrition.Poverty and food insecurity are largely problemsin the rural and estate areas in Sri Lanka.1. The development of Sri Lanka’s agriculture requires many thrusts. There has to be much more investment in research and rural infrastructure development.2. The agricultural extension services that are hardly serving its purpose should be reformed and reconstituted.
  11. 11. 3. The problems of marketing of agricultural produce have to be resolved by developing storage and milling capacity, promoting competition and improving transport facilities.4. There should be more constructive private sector-public sector collaboration. Land policies require to be reformed in the context of current situations to permit land use on the basis of economic returns.5. Productivity increases in agriculture could play an important role in the reduction of poverty, hunger and malnutrition.
  12. 12. Targeted food price subsidies are a popularand common type of intervention aimed atincreasing food consumption of poorhouseholds.The real incomes of the poor, which generallyresults in higher expenditures on food.Subsidy programmes are attractive policyinstruments because they are highly visibleand allow governments to reach a largenumber of poor people easily.
  13. 13.  Provide credit to women in rural areas where agricultural activities are developed. Target agricultural extension activities to women. In Sri Lanka, women are actively involved in many aspects of food crop production (and increasingly in cash crop production). Extension activities geared to women, therefore, could result in increased food production that would benefit household food security, as well as provide an increase in the income of women.
  14. 14. There has been a lack of focus on agriculturalbiodiversity and on food systems as a whole.Our results suggest that farmer-focusedinitiatives that are food-systems based cansustainably improve dietary diversity andimprove micronutrient levels in the diet ofpoor and vulnerable populations resultingimproved nutrition.

×