What is Creativity (Part 2)
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What is Creativity (Part 2)

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University of Illinois professor David Goldberg analyzes the meaning of creativity. He explores 7 senses of the concept of creativity.

University of Illinois professor David Goldberg analyzes the meaning of creativity. He explores 7 senses of the concept of creativity.

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  • 1. What is Creativity? Part 2 David E. Goldberg Illinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering Education University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 [email_address]
  • 2. Creativity as X: 7 Views
    • Creativity is X versus Creativity as X.
    • Simple concepts “is” versus complex concepts “as.”
    • 7 views:
      • C as individual thought process.
      • C as group brainstorming.
      • C as socially enabled/mediated process.
      • C as history.
      • C as generative vision.
      • C as heuristic inventive process.
      • C as eliminating resistance/blocks.
  • 3. C as History
    • Contingency and dependency of technological advance.
    • 1911: Charles Nessler created permanent with curlers & borax paste.
    • Borax dirt cheap because of deposits in Death Valley, CA.
    • Yankee Clippers brought goods to East Coast & UK from California.
    • Brought immigrants to California that resulted in the 1849 Gold Rush.
  • 4. C as Generative Vision
    • Ferguson, E. S. (1992). Engineering and the mind’s eye. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    • Engineers produce set of drawings and specs:
      • Produce the object itself
      • Precision of drawings hides informal choices and inarticulate judgments.
    • Artisan v. Engineering: No drawings v. drawings.
  • 5. C as Inventive Heuristic Process
    • Koen, B. (2003). Discussion of the method: Conducting the engineer’s approach to problem solving. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Weber, R. J. (1992). Forks, phonographs, and hot-Air balloons: A field guide to inventive thinking. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Goldberg, D. E. (2002). The design of innovation: Lessons from and for competent genetic algorithms. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    • Various works on TRIZ: Russian system of invention due to Genrich Altshuller: www.altriz.org .
  • 6. Types of Heuristics
    • Addition of variables
    • Change of variables
    • Tweak variables
    • Recombine combinations of variables
    • Transform variables
    • Change by analogy to another field/domain.
    • Heuristics associated with physical laws.
  • 7. C as Removing Blocks
    • Other approaches positively prescriptive.
    • Approaches that remove negativity or obstacles fairly common:
      • Adams, J. L. (1986). Conceptual blockbusting: A guide to better ideas (3rd ed.). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
      • Pressfield, S. (2002). The war of art. New York: Rugged Land.
    www.ifoundry.uiuc.edu
  • 8. What is Creativity? Part 2 David E. Goldberg Illinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering Education University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 [email_address]