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People, not process (UX Cambridge)

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Ever had the feeling you’re pounding the closed door of common sense? Have you been left crestfallen after stakeholders over-ruled your thoughtful and heavily researched recommendations? …

Ever had the feeling you’re pounding the closed door of common sense? Have you been left crestfallen after stakeholders over-ruled your thoughtful and heavily researched recommendations?

Drawing on his 16 years of design experience and the latest research, Ian will spend this session revealing the key secrets to being heard.

If you follow his advice, your designs will never be the same again.

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  • 1. People, not process Ian Fenn Twitter: @ifenn
  • 2. People, not process Ian Fenn Twitter: @ifenn
  • 3. Thank youBristol Usability Group Twitter: @ifenn
  • 4. 2012
  • 5. “Are you interested in a UX ROLE?” I asked.
  • 6. “YES,” she said.
  • 7. “What experience do you have?”
  • 8. “C, C#, C++, and visual basic”
  • 9. A designer solves problems within a set of constraints. Mike Monteiro
  • 10. A designer solves problems they oftenhave to help identify within a set ofever-changing constraints. Ian Fenn
  • 11. A designer solves problems they oftenhave to help identify within a set ofever-changing constraints. Withoutauthority. Ian Fenn
  • 12. MOST FREQUENT REASON USABILITY ISSUES GO UNFIXED. http://www.slideshare.net/cjforms/why-do-usability-problems-go-unfixed-13865768
  • 13. 1. Start with people, not process.
  • 14. You got hired. Why?
  • 15. THE SIX PROJECT PHASES๏ enthusiasm๏ total confusion๏ disillusionment๏ search for the guilty๏ punishment of the innocent๏ reward and promotion of the non-participants
  • 16. Unfortunately for us, we care
  • 17. THE EXPECTATIONS PYRAMID Succeeding the Project Management Jungle (Doug Russell) http://www.amazon.com/Succeeding-Project-Management-Jungle-Projects/dp/0814416152/
  • 18. 1. ARRIVE ARMED WITH KNOWLEDGE๏ Read the usual suspects - Jared Spool, Jakob Nielsen, Johnny Holland, Boxes and arrows, UX magazine...๏ Familiarize yourself with the high traffic websites that people visit - how are they shaping user behaviour?๏ Question everything around you. Why are things the way they are?๏ Is there a formal project brief? If so, ask for a copy in advance. Print it off. Scribble questions on it.
  • 19. 2. Be dressed for success. http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebitmanky/424680015/
  • 20. 3. SHOW YOUR HRT (HEART)๏ Humility - you are not center of the universe๏ Respect - you genuinely care about others you work with๏ Trust - you believe others are competent and will do the right thing Team Geek (Brian W. Fitzpatrick, Ben Collins-Sussman) http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018025.do
  • 21. 4. Meet the project sponsor
  • 22. I keep six honest serving-men (They taught me all I knew); Their names are What and Why and When And How and Where and Who.- Rudyard Kipling in his "Just So Stories" (1902)
  • 23. ๏ Why are we doing this? (Business needs)๏ What do the users need? (User needs)๏ Where do they want it? (Environment/Device)๏ Who is doing it? (Team)๏ When do we have to get it done by? (Time available)๏ How will we measure success?
  • 24. THE FIVE WHYS1. “Why did the robot stop?”The circuit has overloaded, causing a fuseto blow.2. “Why is the circuit overloaded?”There was insufficient lubrication on thebearings, so they locked up.3. “Why was there insufficient lubricationon the bearings?”The oil pump on the robot is not circulatingsufficient oil.4. “Why is the pump not circulatingsufficient oil?”The pump intake is clogged with metalshavings.5. “Why is the intake clogged with metalshavings?”Because there is no filter on the pump.
  • 25. MORE QUESTIONS๏ What do they expect?๏ What’s in it for them?๏ What challenges do they face?๏ How will they know the project has been successful?๏ Who else should you meet?
  • 26. JIM KALBACH’S PROJECT CANVAShttp://uxtogo.wordpress.com/2012/05/25/the-project-canvas-defining-your-project-visually/
  • 27. 5. Meet the team members
  • 28. http://bit.ly/war-developers
  • 29. http://alextoul.posterous.com/the-war-between-developers-designers-project
  • 30. MEET TEAM MEMBERS๏ What’s their history?๏ How do they work?๏ What has been useful in the past?๏ What has annoyed them?๏ What are their expectations?๏ How do they like to communicate?
  • 31. PRODUCT MANAGERS๏ Some are ux-focused, others are business or technical๏ None of them will be short of an opinion๏ Support all of your work with evidence๏ Share it often
  • 32. PROJECT MANAGERS๏ Treat as you would a project sponsor๏ Be honest about timings and try to stick with them๏ Keep them informed๏ Ask them to coordinate feedback
  • 33. DEVELOPERS AND DESIGNERS๏ Involve them early on๏ Share your work or collaborate often๏ Understand their constraints
  • 34. Smashing UX DesignJesmond Allen and James Chudley
  • 35. THE RELATIONSHIP PRINCIPLES๏ Integration - breaking down walls๏ Communication - ask the stupid questions, paraphrase and confirm, validate terms๏ Flexibility - adapt techniques, your design๏ Transparency - share your process๏ Respect - Partners are naturally creative, resourceful & whole
  • 36. Is it this simple?
  • 37. No.
  • 38. Now... a personal assessment!
  • 39. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 1.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. More likely to lean back when stating opinionsb. More likely to be erect or lean forward when statingopinionsc. Less use of hands when talkingd. More use of hands when talking Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 40. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 2.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Demonstrates less energyb. Demonstrates more energyc. More controlled body movementd. More flowing body movement Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 41. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 3.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Less forceful gesturesb. More forceful gesturesc. Less facial expressivenessd. More facial expressiveness Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 42. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 4.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Softer voiceb. Louder voicec. Appears more seriousd. Appears more fun-loving Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 43. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 5.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. More likely to ask questionsb. More likely to make statementsc. Less inflection in voiced. More inflection in voice Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 44. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 6.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Less apt to exert pressure for actionb. More apt to exert pressure for actionc. Less apt to show feelingsd. More apt to show feelings Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 45. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 7.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. More tentative when expressing opinionsb. Less tentative when expressing opinionsc. More task-orientated conversationsd. More people-orientated conversations Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 46. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 8.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Slower to resolve problem situationsb. Quicker to resolve problem situationsc. More orientated toward fact and logicd. More orientated toward feelings and opinions Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 47. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 9.Please write down A or B, then C or D.a. Slower-pacedb. Faster-pacedc. Less likely to use small talk or tell anecdotesd. More likely to use small talk or tell anecdotes Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 48. A PERSONAL ASSESSMENTPlease individually total the number ofA’s you wrote down, the number ofB’s, the number of C’s... well, you getthe idea... Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 49. Personal styles and effective performance David W. Merrill
  • 50. Less More Analytical DriverLess More Amiable Expressive More
  • 51. AH, THE ASSESSMENTWhich out of A or B has the higher count?a: less assertiveb: more assertiveWhich out of C or D has the higher count?c: less responsived: more responsive Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 52. AH, THE QUESTIONNAIRE HOW DO YOU THINK OTHERS PERCEIVE YOU?๏ less assertive (a) and less responsive (c): analytical๏ more assertive (b) and less responsive (c): driver๏ less assertive (a) and more responsive (d): amiable๏ more assertive (b) and more responsive (d): expressive Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  • 53. DRIVER (FAST, INTENSE, FORMAL, RISK-TAKER, LIKES TO BE IN CHARGE)๏ Focus on the present ๏ Don’t get into a control contest๏ Get to the bottom line ๏ However, don’t back๏ Speak in terms of down if you believe short-term concrete you are right results๏ Give them options๏ Don’t get too personal http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  • 54. EXPRESSIVE(ANIMATED, IMPATIENT, CREATIVE, FOCUS OF ATTENTION, FUNNY, BACK-SLAPPER)๏ Focus on the future ๏ Stimulate their and the big picture creative impulse๏ Illustrate concepts ๏ Compliment them with stories ๏ Don’t dwell on details๏ Seek their ideas, input ๏ Don’t be too serious๏ Show personal ๏ Don’t talk down to interest and involvement them http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  • 55. AMIABLE (SLOW, EASY-GOING, QUIET, FRIENDLY AND INVITING, FORGIVING)๏ Be flexible ๏ Don’t push for too much detail๏ Be easy and informal ๏ Don’t hurry them๏ Be personal and personable ๏ Don’t confront them๏ Emphasize a team ๏ Don’t attack approach ๏ Don’t be dictatorial or autocratic http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  • 56. ANALYTICAL (SLOW, QUIET THOUGHTFUL, PREFERS TO BE ON THEIR OWN)๏ Focus on past, ๏ Tell them exactly what present and future you will do and when๏ Talk facts ๏ Don’t rush things๏ Focus on detail and ๏ Don’t be too personal accuracy ๏ Don’t be overly casual๏ Be logical, well- organized, and serious http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  • 57. Dealing with Difficult PeopleDr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirschner
  • 58. Dealing withpeople youcan’t standDr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirschner
  • 59. Task focusPassive Aggressive Relationship focus
  • 60. Task focus Whiner TankPassive Aggressive Think they Yes person know it all Relationship focus
  • 61. Task focus Whiner TankPassive Aggressive Think they Yes person know it all Relationship focus
  • 62. Task focus Get it right Get it donePassive Aggressive Get along Get appreciated Relationship focus
  • 63. CULTURAL ISSUES: UK๏ Beware the USA sitcom stereotype๏ Humor is regarded as one of the most effective weapons in a British citizen’s arsenal๏ Brits will agree where possible, but qualify their agreement๏ When you wish to criticize, disagree or even praise, do it obliquely (using understatement or coded speech) When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 64. CULTURAL ISSUES: USA๏ Americans are blunt, forthright and direct๏ They’ll have difficulty if you don’t ‘put your cards on the table’๏ Negotiating is considered to be give and take๏ They feel they’re the best - so their norms are assumed to be the only correct ones When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 65. CULTURAL ISSUES: FRANCE๏ Logic will dominate their arguments and lead to an extensive analysis of all matters๏ Opinionated, they nonetheless play their cards close to their chest and build up to them๏ They can be suspicious of early friendliness๏ They may defer decisions away from a meeting When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 66. CULTURAL ISSUES: JAPAN๏ Face must not be lost and politeness must be maintained at all times๏ Their reluctance to say no is well-known๏ Decisions will eventually be made by consensus๏ They are cautious, skilled in stalling tactics and won’t be rushed When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 67. CULTURAL ISSUES: CHINA๏ Politeness is observed at all times. Confrontation and loss of face (for both parties) must be avoided๏ Meetings are principally for information gathering - the real decisions will be made elsewhere๏ A collective spirit prevails - nobody says ‘I’, only ‘We’.๏ They will work step by step in an unhurried manner When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 68. CULTURAL ISSUES: INDIA๏ Indians emanate and expect warmth and respect๏ Do not risk joking with them๏ Be flexible๏ Accept chaos and ambiguity When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  • 69. USEFUL PHRASES๏ ...... (Silence: Beg for forgiveness, not for permission.)๏ “Do you mind me asking - are you looking for solutions or do you just want to get things off your chest?”๏ “Which of the solutions you mentioned would you choose?”๏ “If we were going to meet the delivery date, how could we make that happen?”๏ “How could we find out...”
  • 70. EVEN MORE USEFUL PHRASES๏ “What we might do is...”๏ “We could do...”๏ “Would you...”๏ “I appreciate it when you...”๏ “I agree with some of what you’re saying, but here’s what I would like to see changed...”
  • 71. Staying sane๏ What am I feeling now?๏ What am I thinking now?๏ What am I doing at this moment?๏ How am I breathing?
  • 72. Millican’s Law“This is Millicans Law. If you have a hard gig,quiet, a death, a struggle, whatever, you canonly be mad and frustrated and gutteduntil 11am the next day. Then you must drawa line under it and forget about it. As goinginto the next gig thinking you are shit willmean you will die.”“Equally, if you nail it, slam it, destroy it,whatever, you can only be smug about ituntil 11am the next day (in the past, I haveset an alarm so I could get up and gloat foran extra half hour) as if you go into the nextgig thinking you are Gods gift to comedy,you will die. That is Millicans Law and ittotally works. It means you move on quickly.”http://sarahmillican.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-11-o-clock-rule.html
  • 73. Well done.Now you can think about process
  • 74. One more thing...
  • 75. Last november I received an email...
  • 76. 9.05 – youre greeted in the lobby by a unicorn - yes, a unicorn - trottingaround for a promotional photo shoot. Its just another day at the office.
  • 77. 9.10 – grab an espresso in the cafe;in the queue have a chat with a fellow lead about line management. Youve recently changed the format of your bi-weekly meetings to a more casual lunch and its working brilliantly.
  • 78. 9.20 – your main client is running anAgile process; in your scrum you give a snapshot of what you and your team of 4 are up to.
  • 79. 9.30 – run a workshop with key stakeholders, the creative and tech teams (we like to blend) to scamp 2 routes for an improved purchaseprocess. Our lead strategist kicks theworkshop off with research insights.
  • 80. 11.00 – host a `Big Mama (our bi- weekly team knowledge share). Todays topic: insights from your recent trip to Adaptive Paths UX Intensive.
  • 81. 12.00 – attend another workshop, this time for your other client, hosted by the Creative Director on the account. The objective: sketch a few userjourneys to show how content can be shared across a campaign site, mobile and tablet devices.
  • 82. 1.30 – pick up a few lunch buddiesfor a walk through the local area and a sandwich from a nearby cafe.
  • 83. 2.30 – attend a user testing session in our in-house lab.
  • 84. 3.45 – meet with your team to go through the detail of new wireframesin Axure. Run the wireframes through the personas and stress-test them with experience principles.
  • 85. 5.15 – get debriefed on a pitch youll be helping out with next week. Theprospect: a high fashion brand who want to re-energise their online presence.
  • 86. 6.15 – wind down with a game of table tennis and a beer in the company bar.
  • 87. Notice anything missing?
  • 88. 2. Make time to think
  • 89. A technique forProducing ideas James Webb Young
  • 90. A TECHNIQUE FOR PRODUCING IDEAS๏ An idea is nothing more nor less than a new combination of old elements๏ The capacity to bring old elements into new combinations depends largely on the ability to see relationships
  • 91. A TECHNIQUE FOR PRODUCING IDEAS๏ First, gather raw materials - both the materials of your immediate problem and the materials from your rich store of general knowledge.๏ Second, work over those materials in your mind and try to identify patterns.
  • 92. A TECHNIQUE FOR PRODUCING IDEAS๏ Third, go for a walk in the park. This is the incubating stage, where you let something beside the conscious mind do the work of synthesis.๏ Fourth, an idea will be born, often when you least expect it.๏ Fifth, shape and develop an idea to practical usefulness.
  • 93. A final word...
  • 94. First Rule of Consulting:No matter how much you try, youcan’t stop people from sticking beansup their nose. Jared Spool - http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/
  • 95. Good luck......and thank you. Twitter: @ifenn