Scaling up agriculture and rural development programs supported by IFAD

  • 10,235 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
10,235
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4

Actions

Shares
Downloads
53
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Five key innovations were scaled up within the IFAD projects . They do not represent silver bullets nor blue-prints. These approaches and tools are all interrelated and used in different proportions and degrees of maturity:   Competitions (‘ concursos ’), Transferring funds,Local Resource allocation (LARCs or CLARs in Spanish),Local Talents Women saving accounts. ‘ Concursos ’:One of the driving factors to achieve mass dissemination and application of farmer led best practices is the “ Pacha Mama Raymi ” methodology which was introduced by IFAD as an innovation in the MARENASS project. 73% of MARENASS HH has joined a ‘concursos. The direct transfer of resources to community organizations is a key instrument for empowerment. Local organizations are fully responsible in all projects for the use of project funds to contract technical assistance providers, organize in situ training and implement a myriad of project-related activities. The transfer of funds to recognized local organizations who manage these funds without outside interference has been a radical change from the conventional public investment paradigm. In CORREDOR 57% of the investments, representing 44% of the total budget, was transferred directly to beneficiaries to finance their business plans or for community development Since 2004, the Government of Peru applies an administrative and financial decentralization which facilitated the creation of the Local Resource Allocation Committee (LRAC ). LRACs are responsible for identifying the proposals that are to receive the available resources. Project proposals are selected by LRACs composed of regional and local governments as well as local actors. It warrants transparency in the selection of priority investments. Local talents: With the direct funding poor ‘ campesinos ’ contracted private ‘ técnicos or so called Yachacchiqs ’ of their choice to deliver technical assistance . In MARENASS over 3000 Yachacchiqs (of which 6% women) were trained. Over 12% of these still render private services and about 11% have been absorbed by municipalities. The bulk, 58%, is engaged for their own account in NRM. Women saving accounts :Savings accounts opened by rural women, who never had access to such rural financial services, are viewed by all stakeholders as a most effective tool for empowerment of women Savings mobilization is one of the most promising thematic innovations in the Andean region . It has been scaled up not only in IFAD projects ( aprox. 20 000 accounts) but being mainstreamed in the Conditional Cash Tranfer Porgramme JUNTOS with the support of AGRORURAL.
  • All five essential innovations described earlier are in the process of being institutionally scaled up. Their mainstreaming is characterized by different degrees of maturity in their respective spaces and drivers. Key to this success was that the exit strategy was transformed into a learning pathway with sequential projects building up on proven innovations. After 20 years scaling up was born. 10 years later, scaling up has been mainstreamed into national policies and agencies The interactive map shows the geographical pathway of scaling up, from the southern highland to the northern highlands and the respective results/impact
  • All five essential innovations described earlier are in the process of being institutionally scaled up. Their mainstreaming is characterized by different degrees of maturity in their respective spaces and drivers. Key to this success was that the exit strategy was transformed into a learning pathway with sequential projects building up on proven innovations. After 20 years scaling up was born. 10 years later, scaling up has been mainstreamed into national policies and agencies The interactive map shows the geographical pathway of scaling up, from the southern highland to the northern highlands and the respective results/impact
  • All five essential innovations described earlier are in the process of being institutionally scaled up. Their mainstreaming is characterized by different degrees of maturity in their respective spaces and drivers. Key to this success was that the exit strategy was transformed into a learning pathway with sequential projects building up on proven innovations. After 20 years scaling up was born. 10 years later, scaling up has been mainstreamed into national policies and agencies The interactive map shows the geographical pathway of scaling up, from the southern highland to the northern highlands and the respective results/impact
  • All five essential innovations described earlier are in the process of being institutionally scaled up. Their mainstreaming is characterized by different degrees of maturity in their respective spaces and drivers. Key to this success was that the exit strategy was transformed into a learning pathway with sequential projects building up on proven innovations. After 20 years scaling up was born. 10 years later, scaling up has been mainstreamed into national policies and agencies The interactive map shows the geographical pathway of scaling up, from the southern highland to the northern highlands and the respective results/impact
  • All five essential innovations described earlier are in the process of being institutionally scaled up. Their mainstreaming is characterized by different degrees of maturity in their respective spaces and drivers. Key to this success was that the exit strategy was transformed into a learning pathway with sequential projects building up on proven innovations. After 20 years scaling up was born. 10 years later, scaling up has been mainstreamed into national policies and agencies The interactive map shows the geographical pathway of scaling up, from the southern highland to the northern highlands and the respective results/impact
  • Innovation, learning and scaling up are separate, albeit linked processes (see graph); They are at times complementary, but at times compete; Not every innovation can or should be scaled up. Not every scaling up needs to involve an innovation.
  • Forthcoming Knowledge products : Country case studies (Albania, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Philippines, and Viet Nam with Brookings Institution; plus others by IFAD staff and partners) Thematic knowledge products (country-led scaling up processes, scaling up value chains, M&E and results measurement frameworks) Updating guidance tools towards systematic mainstreaming of scaling up agenda Joint learning/sharing lessons: rather than a one-shot exercise, the October learning events are part of a series of events hosted by diffetrent partners at different venues and addressing different audiences

Transcript

  • 1. SCALING UP AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS SUPPORTED BY IFAD 13-14 June 2011
  • 2. IFAD’s continuing objectives in IFAD9 (that which does not change)
    • IFAD targets poor rural populations and small-scale farmers to reduce rural poverty
    • IFAD will help farmers to meet global and local food needs
    • IFAD will support community-designed and managed rural development projects and farmer organizations
    • IFAD will use government and local management systems rather than managing projects itself
    • IFAD will be a catalyst to mobilize other donor and government resources and policies in favour of the IFAD target group
  • 3. What does change in IFAD9
    • More focus on gender, nutrition, environment, climate change, private sector engagement, economic efficiency, scaling up
    • Country leadership and in-country planning key – reflected in COSOPs and projects
    • IFAD country presence to take on more responsibility
    • IFAD will participate in country agricultural strategies, policy advice, knowledge-sharing, innovation at country level
    • Quality of projects and COSOPs to improve
    • Partnership with all actors
    • Better monitoring and reporting on results and outcomes
  • 4. Obtaining impact on a larger scale is urgent
    • About 1 billion hungry people in the world, relatively stable since the 1990s
    • 2 billion people live on less than $2 per day
    • IFAD’s ongoing projects bringing about 36 million out of poverty
    • IFAD needs to help scale up proven solutions to impact more people
    • Scaling up would improve IFAD efficiency and sustainability of projects
    • Question: how to obtain significantly broader impact on more people without a large expansion of IFAD resources?
  • 5. IFAD has the experience and capacity to scale up
    • Scaling up has already featured prominently in IFAD’s strategic framework(s):
      • Going beyond innovation: “Innovation without scaling up is of little value” (SF 2007-2010)
      • Treating scaling up as “mission critical” (SF 2011-2015)
    • Institutional scaling up review (Brookings 2010) showed that we have good examples of supporting scaling up solutions
    • But we will have to become more systematic about it
    • Peru highland development is a good example of how to do it right (next slides)
  • 6. Peru- Key innovations being scaled up Local talents Local Resource Allocation Commitees (LARC) ‘ Concursos’ (competitions) around NRM Women saving accounts Direct transfer of public funds
  • 7. Peru: effectiveness - impact - efficiency
  • 8. Peru: effectiveness - impact - efficiency
  • 9. Peru: effectiveness - impact - efficiency
  • 10. Peru: effectiveness - impact - efficiency
  • 11. Peru: effectiveness - impact - efficiency
  • 12. Scaling up for broader impact will be the biggest business model change for IFAD9
    • Planning for impact at scale begins in IFAD-Government Country Strategy
    • Each project design to plan for operating at scale
    • Deepen country and local leadership in strategy, project design and execution
    • IFAD-financed projects to use local systems; building capacity for self management
    • Operating at scale requires institutional development at national and local government, farmer organization and civil society
    • Impact at scale requires enabling government policy and public expenditure program, and measurement of impact
    • Mobilizing local and other donor cofinancing and participation easier for programs having large scale impact
  • 13. Operating at scale will mean greater number of beneficiaries per dollar invested
    • The efficiency of projects and programs in terms of the numbers of poor people benefitting will need to increase dramatically
    • Current IFAD targets are to decrease the cost per person pulled out of poverty from IFAD resources from about $ 83 at present, to $ 40.
    • To get there w e will approach the operational challenge of scaling up in a systematic way
  • 14. New idea, model, approach Pilot, Project M&E, Learning & KM Internal knowledge Outside knowledge Limited Impact Scale up Multiple Impact
  • 15. More systematic – The basics 2: changing the mind-set and basic approach
    • Agree on a definition:
      • “ Scaling up means expanding, replicating, adapting and sustaining successful policies, programs or projects in different places and over time to reach a greater number of rural poor.”
    • Change our mindset from “one project at a time” to asking “what next, if this project works?”
    • Develop scaling up strategy early on and take proactive steps to plan and prepare for it (go beyond “exit strategies”).
    • Move from a project to a programmatic (scaling up) approach using our COSOP process proactively.
  • 16. More systematic – the basics 3: Defining pathways for scaling up
    • Define the desired scale
    • Ask who owns and will drive the process
    • Explore how to create the space for scaling up (financial, policy, political, etc.)
    • Develop partnerships early on
    • Define the intermediate results
    • Select IFAD’s operational instruments
      • With own resources (top-up, repeater project, replication across countries, etc.)
      • With or by partners (cofinancing, SWAp, hand-off, etc.)
    • Monitor and evaluate
  • 17. More systematic – the nitty-gritty stuff: Operational processes and incentives
    • Corporate processes
      • Updated COSOP guidelines and source book (Jan 2011)
      • Revised outline Project Design Document (Jan 2011)
      • COSOP and Project Quality Enhancement Process (2011)
      • Portfolio Review Guidelines have separate scoring on replication and scaling up
      • Strategic Framework 2010-12 sees scaling up as mission critical
      • PRISMA will report on scaling up
      • IOE evaluation framework: will cover scaling up aspects
    • Incentives
      • We will acknowledge and reward staff and managers for effective innovation, knowledge management and scaling up
  • 18. Next Steps
    • Expanding our knowledge basis: case studies, thematic reviews
    • Enhancing our country level engagement: guidance tools, CPMT capacity development
    • Monitoring progress and results and adapting as we learn
    • Sharing lessons with like-minded partners: mutual per reviews, joint learning events