IFAD’s Gender and Targeting Webinar Series
Welcome
Purpose of the webinar series
Webinar programme
• 29 April – Livelihood...
Practical tips on how to conduct livelihoods
and gender analysis
Structure
I. Targeting and gender in
project cycle
II. Pu...
I. Where is L&G analysis in the project cycle?
Identification
Design
Implementation and
monitoring
Evaluation
I. Gender an...
Targeting and gender in project cycle
Targeting and gender process
Rural livelihoods
Sustainable livelihoods
framework
Data collection
tools
Project design + in...
II. Purpose of livelihoods and gender analysis
Identification of potential target groups
• Main characteristics of target ...
Useful resources
Social Analysis for Agriculture and Rural Investment
Projects:
 Practitioner’s Guide
(http://www.fao.org...
III. Conceptual framework:
Sustainable livelihoods framework
Livelihood strategies
Farm – home consumption,
market
Off-far...
(Social analysis, Practitioner’s guide, p 11 – 24)
Terminology
Livelihood assets: resource base of individual households
a...
Conceptual framework: Typical areas of inequality
Workloads:
gender division of
labour, household
versus productive tasks,...
IV. Conducting fieldwork: Practical tips
• Bring a holistic approach to fieldwork, brainstorm with
colleagues, enhance ben...
Conducting fieldwork: Data sources
National, regional and district levels
• Secondary data
• Key informant interviews
Chec...
Conducting fieldwork: Field tools
• Wealth ranking
• Household livelihoods profile
• Stakeholder analysis
• Problem analys...
Capture livelihood experiences of people often
overlooked: Groundnut value chain
V. Outputs
Basis for:
• Analysis of project activities and beneficiary outreach
• Analysis of linkages and pathways
• Deve...
Analysis: project activities and beneficiary outreach
Poorer
Transitory poor
Economically
active poor
Well
-off
Participat...
Analysis: Linkages and pathways
Poorer
Transitory poor
Economically
active poor
Well
-off
Poorest
Rural financial services...
Conclusion
Webinar programme
• 29 April – Livelihoods & G analysis
• 20 May – T & G strategies and G marker
• 17 June – In...
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Practical tips on how to conduct livelihoods and gender analysis

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Practical tips on how to conduct livelihoods and gender analysis

  1. 1. IFAD’s Gender and Targeting Webinar Series Welcome Purpose of the webinar series Webinar programme • 29 April – Livelihoods & G analysis • 20 May – T & G strategies and G marker • 17 June – Indicators of impact • Other topics – household methodologies
  2. 2. Practical tips on how to conduct livelihoods and gender analysis Structure I. Targeting and gender in project cycle II. Purpose of livelihoods and gender analysis III. Conceptual framework: livelihoods and gender * IV. Conducting fieldwork * V. Outputs * * Opportunity for contributions
  3. 3. I. Where is L&G analysis in the project cycle? Identification Design Implementation and monitoring Evaluation I. Gender and livelihoods analysis II. Targeting and gender strategies and mechanisms III. Operational measures, indicators, monitoring IV. Evaluation and impact assessment IFAD staff/ consultants PMU staff/ consultants
  4. 4. Targeting and gender in project cycle
  5. 5. Targeting and gender process Rural livelihoods Sustainable livelihoods framework Data collection tools Project design + indicators Gender strategyTargeting strategy Project implementation + M&E Project impact Gender analysisSocio-economic analysis
  6. 6. II. Purpose of livelihoods and gender analysis Identification of potential target groups • Main characteristics of target group – resource base, livelihood strategies, outcomes, vulnerabilities and coping mechanisms – by wealth, by sex, by age Basis for project design/implementation • Analysis of project components by beneficiary and equity issues • Linkages and pathways between target groups and project activities from wealth, sex and age perspectives Strengthen and deepen project impact • Poverty reduction • Gender equality and women’s empowerment • Social inclusion – youth, indigenous peoples
  7. 7. Useful resources Social Analysis for Agriculture and Rural Investment Projects:  Practitioner’s Guide (http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/i2816e/i2816e01.pdf)  Field Guide (http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/i2816e/i2816e02.pdf ) and appendix 1 with links to other websites, resources, and checklists  E-learning Course (http://www.foodsec.org/dl/elcpages/food-security- courses.asp?pgLanguage=en&leftItemSelected=food-security-courses) A Manual for Gender-focused Field Diagnostic Studies in Eastern and Southern Africa (http://www.ifad.org/gender/tools/gender/diagnostic.pdf )
  8. 8. III. Conceptual framework: Sustainable livelihoods framework Livelihood strategies Farm – home consumption, market Off-farm Non-farm, migration Other: remittances, pensions Coping strategies Livelihood outcomes Food security Income Health Well-being Asset accumulation Status Assets Natural Human Physical Financial Social Broader environment Cultural and social norms Institutions and policies Legislatory, regulatory, enforcement External shocks and threats Weather, natural calamities Economic shocks, prices, Pests, diseases, environment
  9. 9. (Social analysis, Practitioner’s guide, p 11 – 24) Terminology Livelihood assets: resource base of individual households and communities Livelihood strategies: range and combination of activities and choices that people make to achieve livelihood goals Livelihood outcomes: what household members achieve through their livelihood strategies Vulnerability context and resilience: exposure to stresses and shocks, of different types and magnitudes, and ability to withstand and recover from shocks
  10. 10. Conceptual framework: Typical areas of inequality Workloads: gender division of labour, household versus productive tasks, multi-tasking, length of working day Access and control over resources: human, natural, physical, financial + social Decision-making: household, group, community Access and control over benefits: monetary, non-monetary, food and nutrition security Well-being: health, freedom from domestic violence, mobility Gender roles and relations Inter-generational issues Cultural norms + practices
  11. 11. IV. Conducting fieldwork: Practical tips • Bring a holistic approach to fieldwork, brainstorm with colleagues, enhance beneficiary voice • Recognize diversity in rural communities and livelihoods • Observe and experience rural livelihoods • Make data collection interesting, relevant, participatory • Seize the opportunity and continually collect information • Strengthen validity of data through triangulation • Continue to learn and reflect on findings
  12. 12. Conducting fieldwork: Data sources National, regional and district levels • Secondary data • Key informant interviews Checklists (SA Field guide, p 17 – 24) Community, groups and households • Community meetings • Focus group discussions • Key informant interviews • Individual household visits Checklists (SA Field guide, p 25 – 42)
  13. 13. Conducting fieldwork: Field tools • Wealth ranking • Household livelihoods profile • Stakeholder analysis • Problem analysis • Seasonal calendar and gender division of labour • Access and control over resources and benefits • Decision-making matrix Field tools (SA Field guide, p 43 – 75)
  14. 14. Capture livelihood experiences of people often overlooked: Groundnut value chain
  15. 15. V. Outputs Basis for: • Analysis of project activities and beneficiary outreach • Analysis of linkages and pathways • Developing targeting and gender strategies Typology of target group • Resources, skills • Access to services • Livelihoods (in context of project) • Vulnerabilities • Coping mechanisms • Needs and priorities Wealth Gender, youth, indigenous peoples’ dimensions
  16. 16. Analysis: project activities and beneficiary outreach Poorer Transitory poor Economically active poor Well -off Participatory planning Infrastructure development Land management FAL classes Broad outreach Poorest Agricultural productivity Food security Agri-business and enterprise development FAL II business management Targeted outreach Household mentoring Safety nets Work programmes
  17. 17. Analysis: Linkages and pathways Poorer Transitory poor Economically active poor Well -off Poorest Rural financial services Agricultural and commercial banks MFIs and NGOs Member-owned Informal Rural community Outreach Products Graduation
  18. 18. Conclusion Webinar programme • 29 April – Livelihoods & G analysis • 20 May – T & G strategies and G marker • 17 June – Indicators of impact • Other topics – household methodologies Recap • Targeting and gender in project cycle • Purpose of livelihoods and gender analysis • Conceptual framework: livelihoods and gender • Conducting fieldwork • Outputs
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