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  • NEN has progressively taken up the scaling up agenda of IFAD by showing prospects for replication or up-scaling in its partner countries. Top-ups, co-financing and partnership building as a systematic pursuit for scaling up were explored. A scaling-up approach was explicitly incorporated in the design of ILDP - Syria, PRIME - Egypt, MBPC - Albania, RBDP - BiH. The annual COSOP review of Sudan focused on scaling up pathways. In Moldova an up-date of the 2009 scaling up case study is in progress, to be followed by a new case study in Albania in the 2nd half of 2011. In Yemen, the community development model and the women‟s savings and credit groups- model were scaled up. PSR ratings for potential for scaling up: 3 rated 6 (DPRDP and RIP- Yemen, and WNRDP - Egypt), 22 projects are rated 5, 6 rated 4 and 2 rated 3. (GASH and BIRD, Sudan). Linking producers to exporters and processors is the most innovative activity supported by the WNRDP in Egypt. Contractual farming proved to be the best marketing option within a farming environment characterised by low farm gate prices, predominance of traditional crops and lack of efficient marketing associations. Contractual farming agreements between the producers / Marketing Associations and export/manufacturing companies comprise of selling high quality agricultural products by the producers and the supply of seeds/seedlings and technical assistance and purchase of agricultural produce by the companies. Microfinance through CDAs is another successful initiative being implemented by the UERDP. The lessons learned from these initiatives are feeding into the design of PRIME project. The two project components - marketing support and rural finance - are direct scaling up of approaches adopted and tested in the above-mentioned projects.The DPRDP in Yemen was scaled up with incremental resources of USD 7.5 mil in December 2009, based on appropriate pathways, drivers and spaces. The project is considered a flagship for community development on a national level and the women‟s savings and credit groups- model has been replicated in other Governorates. The project expanded coverage to additional communities. By scaling up the project activities, IFAD has strengthened livelihood security and resilience to food insecurity of poor rural women who are the main beneficiaries of the project activities. Given the rise in the number of the food insecure households across the Governorates, there is clear evidence of the impact of the income generation activities and the food security component (MTR reports 33% yield increase from distribution of improved seeds). The Yemen RIP: As a result of the project, the Government has mainstreamed the community based roads approach within the framework for the development of the rural road network. On 8 May 2010, the Minister of Public Works and Highways confirmed the long-term inclusion of fourth level rural access roads in the mandate of the Ministry of Public Works and Highways (MoPWH). The Community Roads Unit, which is implementing the project, has been transferred from the Rural Access Programme into the MPWH. The incorporation and mainstreaming of the Community Roads Unit as a permanent unit within the MoPWH the Government‟s recognition of the value of this approach to community-based road development and constitutes a major institutional policy impact and creates the appropriate pathways, drivers and spaces for scaling-up this innovation. In terms of development impact at village level, the Apr.-May 2010 MTR found that the roads, once completed, improve living conditions for beneficiaries, resulting in lower transport prices for people and goods, as well as easier access to markets and other services.In Moldova three sets of activities are constituent elements of the scaling up strategy (i) value chain development, (ii) access to rural credit; (iii) rural infrastructure development in support of commercial activities. Main drivers on the scaling up pathway are the demand of the private sector. There is good endowment for agricultural production and possibilities for transformation into high value added products, however, financing is a key constraint which restricts the development of this potential. By effectively addressing this constraint through the provision of well administered credit lines, the constraints could be somewhat reduced. The institutional and financial spaces were the key spaces developed in support of the scaling up pathway. The approach to channel investment funds through a significant and diverse number of banks in the formal banking system helped to institutionalize the process and familiarize with numerous established banks with rural investment lending. Partnership space has been important in Moldova as both the WB and IFAD operate comparable programs on significant scale. Yet, there has not been direct co-financing or parallel financing. But as programs are channelled through often the same participating banks, and the design of the programs only differs somewhat, there is synergy between the two programs which probably reinforce each other. Scaling up of IFAD achievements is inherently part of the latest nationwide IFAD-funded project ILDP in Syria and takes into account country programme experiences in innovation an scaling up. The scaling up pathways under the ILDP is a building block under a broader agenda for scaling up in Syria, in the area of rangelands management, rural finance, community development and water management. The drivers for Scaling up for rural microfinance is the lack of a rural credit delivery system and the huge unsatisfied demand of credit by the rural poor calling for rapid action to scale up sanduqs as the most promising solution. In the case of rangeland management the main driving factor for the original IFAD intervention was the deterioration in the quality of the range due to overgrazing. This and the absence of a defined strategy regarding the role of local communities in the use of rangeland resulted in a strong drive for scaling up the BRDP experience which tackled successfully these constraints. The scaling up of the rangelands intervention is a reflection of a strong political and organizational leadership mainly MAAR and the project‟s PSC. The legal space and policy space for rangelands development is provided by the legal decisions of February 1996, which mapped and recognised the territories of the cooperatives involved. The financial space was guaranteed by the resources devoted to BRDP and ILDP by GOS and AFESD. The establishment of the Badia Authority and Directorate, the formation of herders associations with full involvement in implementation, and the PSC, NPDs, PPDs provide the institutional space for scaling up the Badia rangelands intervention. Community based RMCs and herders associations provide local acceptability to the participatory approach and cultural space for scaling up. IFAD‟s long standing relations with ICARDA, ACSAD and ICBA provides the partnership space. During the annual COSOP review workshop in Sudan, two SOs of the Results-Based Measurement Framework were identified for scaling-up: SO1: Increased participation of producers‟ organizations in planning and monitoring agricultural policy and SO 3: Increased access of the rural poor women and men to microfinance. With regard to SO1: In the Sudan context, the community development approach represents an innovative model for scaling up in which CDCs are key. They are the main actors in rural development planning and elaboration of community development plans. CDCs in SKRDP, GSLRP and WSRMP were strengthened continuously. Illustrating vertical scaling up is the growing recognition of political authorities of the role of CDCs. Horizontal scaling up is on-going through the take up by other development projects like the Government of National Unity (GoNU) Plan of Sudan and the WB financed community development initiatives. Drivers and spaces for this scaling up were discussed and detailed by the workshop participants. Drivers include legal recognition, bottom up planning, and instruments and training for empowerment. Spaces were defined to include local NRM, political support, and knowledge sharing. With regard to SO3: IFAD‟s micro-finance adviser in Sudan shared an overview of background, pilots, performance and programmatic approach of the potential of scaling up micro-finance experiences. These experiences were initially gained in NKRDP by strengthening the sanduqs. The Central Bank of Sudan (CBS)by adopting a microfinance strategy for poverty reduction and employment creation, has led to opening political and policy space leading to the establishment of the Microfinance Unit and the Sudan Microfinance Development Facility. Three main piloting initiatives supported by IFAD and the CBS are now the drivers for scaling-up: first, the Bara‟ah, a central sanduq for 45 villages is emerging to a regional microfinance institution. Secondly, ABSUMI is the microfinance initiative of the Agricultural Bank of Sudan reaching out with microfinance products to up to 1 mil clients. WSRMP, the third pilot, has a vision of reaching out to thousands of savings and credit groups. The creation of the fiscal and policy space illustrate how well the IFAD co-financed programme have been able to benefit to mainstream its microfinance operations and to align these to best practices and to IFAD's rural finance policy.
  • …. Building on technologies and practices successfully applied by the Badia Rangelands Development Project, NEN is supporting the Integrated Livestock Development Project, whose overall objective would be to restore the productivity of additional Badia rangelands.This project integrated some lessons learnt from Badia Project:first lesson: despite the advanced state of degradation, much of the perennial native species with high forage value still have significant regeneration potential;second lesson: the success of any large-scale rehabilitation effort hinges on resolving key socio-economic constraints through organizing rangeland users (Bedouins) into socially cohesive traditional groupings to ensure the equitable and sustainable management of the rehabilitated resource;third lesson: the most pertinent technological and institutional options to ensure rapid healing of the ecosystems and simultaneously provide a substantial increase in forage output, are relatively simple;fourth lesson: through the above institutional and technological packages, by PY6 or full development, the BRDP had brought about significant cumulative productivity gains that helped to increase average production from 100 kg of dry matter per hectare before the project to 400 kg/ha in rested rangelands, 1,200 kg in reseeded rangelands (twelvefold increase) and 1,500 kg (fifteen fold) in rangelands treated with fodder shrubs plantations.Drivers for scaling-up.    The main driving factor for the original IFAD intervention was the deterioration in the quality of the range due to overgrazing. This and the absence of a defined strategy regarding the role of local communities in the use of rangeland resulted in a strong drive for scaling up the IBRD experience which tackled successfully these constraints.  The scaling up of the rangelands intervention is a reflection of a strong political and organizational leadership mainly MAAR and the project’s PSC. Drivers at local level are the provincial governments, the leaders and the members of herders associations, farmers associations, and the communities themselves. Funding received from IFAD and AFESD and the commitments of GOS have been decisive factors in driving the development interventions to scale. An important set of drivers pushing the scaling up process are the incentives that would be provided by the project at individual, community and institutional level including: significant increase in forage availability; construction and equipping of veterinary centres, mobile veterinary units; distribution of improved Awassi rams; training and technical assistance etc.The legal space and policy space forrangelands development is provided by (a) the legal decision (No. 759/V) of February 1996, which mapped and recognised the territories of the cooperatives involved; and (b) legislation regulating dry farming in the Badia, Law no 40 in 1970, and its amendments in 1973 and 2006), whereby the cropping of barley was definitely banned. The implementation of the BRDP and the design of the ILDP is a manifestation of the continuing policy intention of the GOS with respect to rangelands development. The financial space is guaranteed by the resources devoted to BRDP and ILDP by GOS and AFESD. The establishment of the Badia Authority and Directorate, the formation of herders associations with full involvement in implementation, and the PSC, NPD, PPDs provide the institutional space for scaling up the Badia rangelands intervention. Community based RMCs and herders associations provide local acceptability to the participatory approach and cultural space for scaling up. IFAD’s long standing relations with ICARDA, ACSAD and ICBA provides the partnership space. Regular monitoring and evaluation and feedback from communities and field-based staff will be important for learning and adjustments to take place. 
  • The North Kordofan Rural Development Project introduced a semi-formal village credit scheme, entitled sanduq that comprises the scaling up of traditional self-help savings and credit funds. Given the pilot nature of the activity, the process of sanduq establishment, management and operation has been closely monitored. One key aspect in the monitoring system has been the tracking of the sanduq outreach, disaggregated by socio-economic group and gender. The information is then used by village committees to devise modalities for increasing the access of poor men and women to these services. These modalities have included : (i) relaxing sanduq membership eligibility criteria by decreasing the initial contribution; (ii) payment of initial contribution in instalments for the poorer; (iii) use sanduq profits to guarantee access to credit of poorer groups; and (iv) relaxing lending terms. Poor households are identified during a wealth ranking exercise undertaken by the local extension teams with the village leadership and community members. In terms of outreach, the sanduq services were accessible to 32% of the poor households in beneficiary communities in 2003, up from 20% in 2002. Also, the total number of women‑headed households participating in the sanduqs constituted 33% of total women‑headed households in the beneficiary villages. In 2003, poor households and women members accounted for 54% and 37% respectively of the total sanduq membership.
  • Now the process of strengthening the sanduqs, supported by the Central Bank of Sudan, has led to opening political and policy space leading to the establishment of the Microfinance Unit (MFU) and the Microfinance Development Facility (SMDF). Three main piloting initiatives supported by IFAD are now the drivers for scaling-up: first, the Bara’ah, a central sanduq for 45 villages is emerging to a regional microfinance bank; secondly, The Agricultural Bank of Sudan Micro-Finance Initiative (ABSUMI) that is going to reach out with microfinance products up to 1 million clients; and the Saving and Credit Groups of WSRMP, the third pilot, that has a vision of reaching out to thousands of groups.Bara′ah was established in mid-2007, to respond to the limited saving and financing capacity of smallholder farmers and for improving the agricultural and livelihood conditions of the poor people by providing their direct access to financial services. It initially supported 35 communities. Bara'ah started lending activities in January 2008 through grants from SKRDP and through savings mobilized from the communities. An assessment of Bara′ah by the IFAD supervision mission of November 2008 indicated the need for a business plan approach to growth and sustainability. In early 2009, a business plan was formulated for restructuring Bara'ah’s governance, management and operations arrangements so that it could collaborate with the CBS-MFU, SMDF and formal financial institutions and scale-up to maximize outreach on a sustainable basis. Currently funded by a Swedish contribution of US$ 2.1 million, additional funding will be supplied by the CBS which has already committed US$ 1.5 million in portfolio assistance The implementation of the business plan started in late 2009. By the end of 2011 Bara′ah is expected to reach approximately 2,500 incremental small-holder households in 40 villages. It is expected to be scaled-up to serve around 20,000-25,000 households by 2017In this case the scaling up process is based on enhancing the range of products and services as well by increasing the outreach to the number of rural households.  Scaling-up to reach additional households within the Al Rashad Locality will be according to the path outlined in the business plan. Scaling-up of the model to areas outside the Locality will be based on partnerships with financial institutions, the Central Bank and the Government and non-government entities. The State government of South Kordofan has already expressed its desire to replicate the Bara′ah model in other Localities through linkages with the Zakat fund and the Unity fund. Simultaneously, in the neighboring State of North Kordofan, a group of 170 village level sanduqs, is attempting revival through the Bara'ah model.
  • Intervention being scaled upDevelopment of a replicable model of sustainable, small-scale commercial livestock production which would demonstrate the income earning potential of the livestock sector and contribute to the revival of the rural areas. From livestock, the scaling up pathway was widened to address all agricultural activities and rural enterprises;
  • Opportunities for innovation and scaling upWhose ideaIFAD, State Ministry of Finance /Treasury, Entity Ministries Agriculture and Finance Piloting/ testing/ evaluation The intervention was tested/ piloted, from 2001 to 2005, in 5 FBiH and 6 RS poor municipalities. Upon successful implementation, the project area was extended, in 2005, to 9 additional municipalities; it covers now 39 FBiH and 26 RS municipalities.Vision The vision is to cover all non-commercial rural agricultural enterprises in the country DriversCatalysts Four internal catalysts calling for rapid solutions pushed scaling up:(i) the huge damages from the civil war, which altered the social and economic map of the country; (ii) the transition from intensive international emergency assistance to focussed sustainable development; (iii) the complete lack of a rural credit delivery system coupled with a huge need of credit by the rural poor; and (iv) the need for reforms and economic development to meet the conditions set for EU accession. External catalysts Funding received from IFAD and OPEC Fund and the commitments of Governments to external partners has been a decisive catalyst/driver. Significant external partners were, also, the World Bank, UNDP, EU, USAID and SIDA.Local driversThe drivers at the local level consist of the: (i) unmet demand for credit by producers /entrepreneurs; (ii) unmet demand for rural infrastructure projects; (iii) State and Entity Governments; (iv) project coordination units (PCU in FBiH and APCU in RS); (v) cantonal and municipality authorities; (vi) leaders and members of local Associations and committees; (vii) service providers (NGOs, consultants, MCOs, banks).Incentives Significant incentives comprised the articulation and focus on the community demand driven dimension of development and the specific project incentives and accountabilities at the level of the individual (staff and producers) and the level of the institutions. Specific project incentives included: (i) material support to PAs; (ii) grant support (FFAM) on cost-sharing basis and establishment costs of milk collection points; (iii) cumulative productivity gains that helped increase livestock and agricultural production and quantities of marketed produce; (iv) building of capacities and provision of technical and business advice to primary producers, PA boards, and SME and bank staff through training; (v) construction of 193 infrastructure micro-projects, providing social and economic benefits to some 200,000 persons; (vi) credit support to some 5,000 loan beneficiaries, who improved incomes and ownership of assets; (vii) creation of full and part-time rural employment; (viii) salaries, technical assistance and training to project staff. Spaces Political, policy, legal and regulatory space(i) signature / ratification of project legal agreements with IFAD and OPEC Fund and Italian Government for FFAM Grant; (ii) loan subsidiary agreements with PFIs; (iii) FBiH and RS microfinance laws, RS law on SCAs, and amendment of RS ‘banking agency law’, all enacted in 2006; (viii) Stabilization and Association Agreement, and Trade and Trade-related Issues interim agreement signed with EU (June 2008).Financial and fiscal space Financial / fiscal space of USD 74.5 million, including 3 IFAD and 3 OFID loans, FFAM grant, 2 CEN grants and contributions by Entity governments, PFIs and beneficiaries. Institutional space Establishment of: 2 project coordination units (PCU and APCU); producers associations (PAs); community infrastructure committees; community based SCAs (for RS only); processors associations; ‘FBiH Chamber of Agriculture’, ‘RS Goat and Sheep farmers Association’, ‘Union of Beekeepers of Bihac Region’.Natural resource / environmental space IFAD-supported projects protected underground and surface waters from pollution; soil fertility from erosion; community hygienic conditions and the health of children and adults by securing sustainable access to improved drinking water and raising farmers’ awareness on protecting natural resources and environment.Partnership External partnership space: IFAD, WB, UNDP, UNOPS, EU, KfW, USAID, SIDA, CGAP;Learning space Implementation and supervision arrangements set by IFAD and PCU/ APCU created a learning space by strengthening capacity for mutual learning and enhancing ‘learning by doing’; Procedures suitable to the specific interventions are reflected in Project documents and Working Papers; The FBiH and RS project M&E systems provide information of what works and what doesn’t work and the knowledge produced is shared by partners through six-monthly /annual progress reports, supervision and completion reports, interim reviews and impact surveys; New knowledge is also shared during training of the members and leaders of the PAs, committees, SCAs, SMEs and farmers; The success in the scaling up of the intervention has been enhanced by local and international technical assistance that visit the projects for specific purposes and the conduct of studies and surveys on thematic, diagnostic and other topics. Regular monitoring and evaluation and feedback from beneficiaries, communities and field-based staff are very important for learning to take place.Pathways The sequencing of innovations being implemented include 3 scaling up pathways: (i) development /strengthening of rural enterprises through investment lending by PFIs (both banks and MFIs), with PFIs assuming a significant part of investment lending (20-35%) to rural areas with their own funds at same terms and conditions as the IFAD loans; (ii) construction of economic rural infrastructure for the alleviation or removal of bottlenecks to improve the assets and incomes of poor rural people, e.g. roads, water supply schemes, sewage systems, small scale irrigation; and (iii) enhancing partnerships with the institutions of the rural poor and civil society organizations using community-driven development approaches and building capacities of service providers to enable agricultural (extension, research, veterinary) programmes at the state and entity levels and business development systems to provide pro-poor demand driven advice, ensuring more sustainable mechanisms for the delivery of services to farmers and entrepreneurs. Time horizon 16 years, 2001 – 2017 Role of drivers and spaces In the investment lending scaling up pathway, the most important driver will be the unmet credit demand and the size of the financial space to be created i.e. the amount of funds to be made available for credit, with IFAD being the important external catalyst in pushing PFIs to participate at a larger scale with own funds in rural investments. Likewise, the unmet demand for rural economic infrastructure and the size of the financial space to be created, i.e. the amount of money to be made available for construction /rehabilitation of infrastructure projects will be the most important drivers in the scaling up pathway for the economic rural infrastructure pathway. The key determinant for success in the scaling up pathway of the value chain approaches and the technical and business support services will be institutional i.e. the creation of appropriate institutional space. IFAD’s roleIFAD’s role has been significant with the Country Programme Managers (CPMs) being the key drivers in the scaling up pathway. The CPMs followed up persistently and liaised intensively with State and Entity Governments and other stakeholders to find solutions and put the Projects in the right implementation track, and maintain the pace of implementation and scaling up at high level. IFAD amended the LRFDP loan agreement twice to expedite achievements of project objectives. For the closed LRFDP alone, IFAD fielded 30 follow up and support missions. Each mission contributed to the implementation process, offered solutions to problems as they arose and submitted to governments and PCU/APCU constructive suggestions and recommendations, which were followed up and acted upon as appropriate.Impact of scaling up process There have been significant achievements with positive impact on the rural poor, including: (i) significant cumulative productivity gains that helped increase livestock and agricultural production and quantities of marketed produce; (ii) build-up of capacities of PA boards, SME and bank staff, primary producers and entrepreneurs, and institutional enhancement of the vertical and horizontal integration of the value chains with expansion of trade and access to new local and foreign markets; (iii) credit support to 5,000 loan beneficiaries with improvements in incomes and ownership of assets; (iv) construction of 193 infrastructure micro-projects, providing social and economic benefits to some 200,000 persons; (vi) positive impact on the environment and the agricultural resource base, with beneficial effects on rural households; (vii) equal access of women to the knowledge disseminated and to project resources with positive impact on income and quality of life;
  • The Pilot Community-Based Infrastructure Project for Highland Areas (CBRIP) in Yemen aims to improve the living standards of the rural poor in twelve highland governorates through support for community-led solutions to rural infrastructure problems, in particularly poor rural roads and limited access to domestic water. It has supported the participatory and demand-driven construction or upgrading of over 200km of rural roads using labour intensive methods in which the communities served by the roads are contracted to undertake the construction, with technical support from qualified civil engineers, and are then empowered to take on responsibility for planning, financing and managing routine road maintenance and repairs. Since 2007 the project is estimated to have benefited over 300,000 individuals and beneficiaries have been estimated to be accruing USD 0.6 – USD 1.0 in benefits per household per day, based on reduced travel times and costs and subsequently increased incomes and reduced costs of goods, including food, which are transported to the villages.
  • Scaling-Up: A key concern of the project was to introduce community-driven rural road improvements into the core, long-term mandate of the Ministry of Public Works and Highways. As a result of the success of the project, on 8 May 2010, the Minister of Public Works and Highways confirmed the long-term inclusion of fourth level rural access roads in the mandate of the Ministry of Public Works and Highways and the Community Roads Unit, which is implementing the project, has now been transferred from the originally separate programme management unit into the Ministry itself. This demonstrates the Government’s recognition of the value of this approach to rural road development and creates the appropriate pathways, drivers and spaces for future scaling-up of this innovation.
  • Linking producers to exporters and processors is the most innovative activity supported by the WNRDP in Egypt. Contractual farming proved to be the best marketing option within a farming environment characterised by low farm gate prices, predominance of traditional crops and lack of efficient marketing associations. Contractual farming agreements between the producers / Marketing Associations and export/manufacturing companies comprise of selling high quality agricultural products by the producers and the supply of seeds/seedlings and technical assistance and purchase of agricultural produce by the companies. Microfinance through CDAs is another successful initiative being implemented by the UERDP. The lessons learned from these initiatives are feeding into the design of PRIME project. The two project components - marketing support and rural finance - are direct scaling up of approaches adopted and tested in the above-mentioned projects.
  • Building on successful experiences registered in the West Noubaria Rural Development Project and in the Upper Egypt Rural Development Project IFAD together with the Government has decided to scale up some approaches adopted and tested in the above-mentioned projects in a new project: PRIME-Promotion of Rural Incomes through Market Enhancement. While PRIME brings in new features and a different approach from past interventions – namely introducing the concept of value chain and targeting all actors within the chain - it builds on successful elements of ongoing interventions (WNRDP and UERDP for market linkages and microfinance). The conceptual framework developed in IFAD’s for scaling up has been used to illustrate that the essential ingredients of scaling up is embodied in the basic design characteristics of PRIME. The scaling up pathways under PRIME is a building block for a broader scaling up agenda in the Egypt Country Programme. Scaling-up idea and vision. PRIME was designed to fill in a gap in the smallholder farmers access to output markets and rural finance, to take full advantages of existing remunerative marketing opportunities (urban and international), and to utilize Governorates technical, location, and climatic comparative advantages. The vision is to assist smallholders (organized into associations) establish market linkages with private sector operators along selected value chains to enhance their livelihood capacity and income, notwithstanding the small size of their lands. This would be done through building on and scaling up the successful experience of WNRDP and UERDP and introducing innovative dimensions of support across all qualifying actors along the value chain. PRIME would scale up the linkages established under the WNRDP and the UERDP (in which smallholders are currently interacting with a large number of private companies) in seven governorates in Lower and Upper Egypt. Such vision includes extending finance to small farmers and micro, small and medium enterprises to cement the created linkages along the value chains and satisfy part of the currently large unmet demand for rural and agribusiness finance. This vision will use experienced IFAD partners (SFD) as well as new promising partners (ARDF).Drivers for scaling-up are: (i) the large existing unsatisfied market demand for commodities that are currently produced by smallholders (horticulture, livestock and herbs and medicinal products), and for which exporters and processors need to purchase increased quantities to satisfy demand; (ii) the huge unsatisfied demand for credit by the rural poor and agribusiness SMEs which call for rapid action to scale up the most promising solutions; and (iii) these products do not necessitate farmers to own large plots of lands and women are strongly involved in their production and processing. This scaling up is a reflection of existing championship in this field and of political and organizational leadership at a high level in GOE (e.g. MALR, MOPIC, SFD, ARDF and Commercial Banks). External catalysts are represented by financial and other support for SMEs by WorldBank, AfDB, UNDP, UNIDO and IFAD. To ensure continuous momentum PRIME will provide incentives at institutional level in terms of capacity building/training to partners (SFD, ARDF, PFIs), to value chain actors, and to local level institutions as well as equal opportunities and selected quotas for women. These incentives would be associated with clear accountability to encourage actors to look at scaling up as a key criterion defining success.Scaling up spaces. The legal and policy space are provided through the Government’s Agriculture Strategy, the Micro finance strategy and all recently introduced laws facilitating the growth of SMEs. Cultural space is provided through participatory approaches involving women, youth, poor farmers and all other local stakeholders for market linkages and financial intermediaries for microfinance. The learning space would be provided through GOE creating a proper legal framework for Public Private Partnerships (PPP) that encourage increased interactions between smallholders and private sector market players, and donors interactions through the existing forum. The institutional/organizational space for scaling up is represented by the enhanced capacity of the ARDF and the SFD, and the affiliated commercial banks and non-bank local MFIs. The financial space isembodied bythe GOE, ARDF, SFD contribution to PRIME, donors parallel cofinancing as well as the leveraging of commercial banks funds. The partnership space is illustrated by private sectors’ eagerness to work closely with PRIME beneficiaries along the selected values chains, farmers associations’ eagerness to enter into win-win contractual agreements with processors and exporters and ARDF/SFD eagerness to work with all partners to implement the project. Partnership between IFAD and other donors (as explained above) would be a corner stone in implementation. Pathways to scaling up. For market linkages sustainability will be ensured through strong contractual relationships between smallholders associations and the private sector and sustainable access to new agricultural technologies. The value chain approach will ensure the sustainable linkage between smallholders and market players. The sustainability path is assured through farmers associations partnerships with interested private companies (exporters, processors) and creation of commercial relationships that are mutually beneficial. For microfinance, strong financial intermediaries (including Banks, NGOs, CDAs, etc.) that are able to assess the viability of loan proposals and provide follow up support will represent the pathway to scaling up.

Transcript

  • 1. Scaling-up in NEN
  • 2. Scaling-up in NEN Country Project Key activity/component West Noubaria RuralEgypt Contractual farming Development Project Upper Egypt Rural MicrofinanceEgypt Development projectBosnia and Livestock Rural finance Synergetic use of: 1.Livestock development, 2. Provision of credit,Herzegovina Development Project 3. Enterprise development, and 4. Rural InfrastructureYemen Dhamar Project Women’s savings and credit groups Yemen RuralYemen Community-based roads approach Infrastructure Project Three sets of activities: (i) value chain development, (ii) access toMoldova rural credit; (iii) rural infrastructure development in support of commercial activities. Integrated LivestockSyria Microfinance – sanduq Development ProjectSudan Community development approach North Kordofan Rural Microfinance – sanduqSudan Development Project
  • 3. Syria: where we were1) Testing techniques to rehabilitate rangelands 2) Testing village-based microfinance “sanduq” initiatives 1) Badia Rangelands Development Project 2) Idleb Rural Development Project
  • 4. Syria: what is next Integrated Livestock Development Project achieving a sustainable increase in theincomes of poor rural people whose livelihoods depends on livestock activities in low-potential areasScaled-up by IFAD and the GovernmentLessons learnt from Badia Rangelands Development Project and Idleb Rural Development Project incorporated in the design
  • 5. Sudan: where we wereTesting pro-poor financial institutionsNorth Kordofan Rural Development Projectcreating sustainable participatory financial institutions
  • 6. Sudan: where we are South Kordofan Rural Development Project enhancing incomes and productivity;creating sustainable rural credit servicesScaled-up by the State Government of South KordofanEnhancing the range of productsand services and increasing the outreach
  • 7. Bosnia and Herzegovina -BiH: where we were Testing & piloting a model of small-scale commercial livestock production Livestock and Rural Finance Development Project Tested & piloted in 11 municipalities (2002-2005)
  • 8. BiH: where we are Extended to 9 additional municipalities Model replicated and expended to over also fruits & vegetable VC (2005-2011)  now in 65 municipalities Scaled-up by IFAD, State Ministry of Finance /Treasury, Entity Ministries Agriculture and Finance A model of small-scale commercial livestock production
  • 9. Yemen: where we were Testing strategies to improve mobility in rural areasPilot Community-Based Infrastructure Project for Highland AreasReducing isolation of rural communities through participatory, demand driven infrastructure development
  • 10. Yemen: where we are Mainstreamed into national roads frameworkScaled-up by Government in response to success of pilot activities Community-based approach to rural road development
  • 11. Egypt: where we were Testing contractual farming and microfinancethrough Community development associationsWest Noubaria Rural Development Project encouraging development of small and medium enterprises Upper Egypt Rural Development Project empower rural poor people to create sustained employment and increase their income
  • 12. Egypt: what is nextPromotion of Rural Incomes through Market Enhancement (PRIME) Linking producers to exporters and processors Scaled-up by IFAD and the Government jointlyContractual farming from West Noubaria Rural Development Project and Microfinance through CDAs – Upper Egypt RuralDevelopment Project incorporated in the design