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IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
IFAD ENRM policy presentation
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IFAD ENRM policy presentation

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  • Why are we developing this policy?\n\nBoard requested for a cc strategy and an ENRM policy in conjunction with our 8th replenishment.\nARRI evaluation: environment and natural resources were found to be one of the weakest rated impact areas.\nThere is an internal demand for greater coherence on ENRM. We have the ESA Procedures, that we revised in 2008, but we lack a broader framework within which to implement them.\nIn addition to providing that coherence, this policy seeks to better align IFAD’s operations with the wider donor community.\nWe believe that delivering on ENRM is critical to meeting our mandate of rural poverty alleviation and enhanced food security.\n
  • The Indo-Gangetic Plain stretches from Pakistan to Bangladesh, covering 700,000 sq km and inhabiting about one billion people. The region is known for its rice-wheat system, where rice is cultivated in the summer and wheat in the winter.\n\nThis region, in a sense, represents a hotspot in terms of a decline in the natural assets that sustain agricultural production. We all recall the recent floods in Pakistan that along with drought in Russia are driving food prices close to the levels of 2007-08. We are also aware of the sharp decline in the Himalayan glaciers that renders water flows increasingly unpredictable.\n\nAt the same time, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is living proof of the backlash of the Green Revolution: with salinisation, nutrient mining, declining organic matter, groundwater depletion and excessive use of agrochemicals resulting in the emergence of resilient pest and weed populations.\n\nIn the case of the Indo-Gangetic Plain, government subsidies to groundwater extraction constitute a tremendous disincentive for farmers to adopt more water efficient crops and irrigation techniques. Environmental legislation has effectively reduced the use of pesticides in countries like India and Indonesia. Where farmers are expected to invest in the long-term productivity of the soil, secure access to land is fundamental. Moreover, incentives are needed to cover the short-term costs of long-term sustainability.\nThe Outcome? (read slide)\n
  • IFAD AND ITS PARTNERS FACE AN INCREASINGLY COMPLEX AND INTERCONNECTED CONTEXT FOR USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES – LAND, WATER, FORESTS, ETC\n\nDelivering our mandate on rural poverty alleviation and food security is increasingly resembling solving a Rubik’s cube. Where we used to focus on one face, agricultural productivity, we now see that there is much more to the challenge.\nTo deliver on poverty and food security, we must build climate resilience.\nIn the face of a global water crisis, we must place much greater emphasis on water resources management.\nWith land-use change reaching unsustainable levels, intensification is the only viable way forward for increasing global agricultural output.\nStill, in light of growing evidence on the essential role of biodiversity and ecosystems, we must pursue agricultural intensification in a way that maintains and enhances ecosystem services.\n\nJules Pretty: Thus the goal of the agricultural sector is no longer simply to maximize productivity, but to optimize it across a far more complex landscape of production, rural development, environmental and social justice outcomes (IAASTD, 2009; Godfray et al., 2010; Sachs et al., 2010).\n\nTHESE ARE SOME OF THE FACES OF THE RUBIK’S CUBE WE HAVE TO SOLVE IN A WORLD THAT IS MORE INTERCONNECTED AND HENCE MORE COMPLEX THAN EVER.\n
  • In the face of complexity, interconnectedness and growing scarcity, we propose the following policy to guide IFAD’s response.\n
  • Note highlights.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • (IMAGE: WATERING SEEDLINGS FOR AGROFORESTRY IN BURKINA FASO)\nSMALLHOLDER FARMERS CANNOT AFFORD to separate agricultural production and natural resources management.\nThere is growing evidence of the LIMITS OF THE GREEN REVOLUTION, which placed emphasis on production at the expense of long-term sustainability. As a result, input-intensive agricultural technologies are falling prey to the law of diminishing returns. In many regions, agricultural productivity growth has stagnated.\nThere is tremendous potential to SCALE UP AN EXISTING TOOLKIT OF LOCALLY ADAPTED, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL APPROACHES, that enable multiple wins for production, poverty reduction and the environment, including a variety of approaches to \nconservation agriculture, \nintegrated soil nutrient management,\nintegrated pest management, \nagroforestry, and \nintegrated water resources management.\n\nEXAMPLES\n\nParticipatory tree domestication grant in Wets and Central Africa (ICRAF):\nconservation of locally adapted agrobiodiversity, \nlivelihood diversification, \nreduced deforestation and forest degradation.\n\nIFAD STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES (PORTFOLIO REVIEW)\n\nSuccess area: potential for scaling up. (this is where we really can increase impact)\nENRM often seen as apart from IFAD’s core mandate – lack of landscape-level analysis.\nLimited understanding of the opportunities and constraints for scaling up.\n
  • Building on IFAD and its partners experience and illustrating how they translate in practice, including how they INTERACT at the LANDSCAPE LEVEL. RECOGNIZE that a key issue or sector can be an ENTRY POINT for developing a more INTEGRATED and CROSS-SECTORAL ENRM approach.\n
  • In land policy, one size does not fit all!\n Even where policy dialogue does not yield results, improved land management and land-use planning offer opportunities on the local level.\n IFAD favours alternatives to land acquisitions.\n
  • Not just stopping at policy level\n
  • Message: incorporates and builds on climate strategy matrix\n
  • Message: incorporates and builds on climate strategy matrix\n
  • Message: incorporates and builds on climate strategy matrix\n
  • Message: incorporates and builds on climate strategy matrix\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. IFAD Policy on Environment andNatural Resources ManagementAn Ever-Green Revolution: Resilient Livelihoods through theSustainable Use of Natural Resources
    • 2. A. The Threat: acceleratingenvironmental degradation is strippingthe natural asset base of the rural poor • Ecosystems • Biodiversity • Water • Land degradation • Climate change
    • 3. The problem:complexity,
    • 4. B. ENRM Policy
    • 5. GoalEnable the rural poor toescape and remain outof poverty throughmore productive andresilient livelihoods andecosystemsPurposeTo integrate thesustainable managementof natural assets acrossthe activities of IFADand its partners
    • 6. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…
    • 7. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification
    • 8. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets
    • 9. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development
    • 10. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks
    • 11. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth
    • 12. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth6. Improved governance of natural assets through strengthened land tenureand community led empowerment for the rural poor 
    • 13. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth6. Improved governance of natural assets through strengthened land tenureand community led empowerment for the rural poor 7. Livelihood diversification for sustainable natural resource use andclimate resilience
    • 14. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth6. Improved governance of natural assets through strengthened land tenureand community led empowerment for the rural poor 7. Livelihood diversification for sustainable natural resource use andclimate resilience 8. An inclusive gender approach and the full participation of indigenous peoples in managing natural resources
    • 15. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth6. Improved governance of natural assets through strengthened land tenureand community led empowerment for the rural poor 7. Livelihood diversification for sustainable natural resource use andclimate resilience 8. An inclusive gender approach and the full participation of indigenous peoples in managing natural resources9. Rural smallholder communities to benefit from environment andclimate finance
    • 16. 10 principles: IFAD will promote…1. Scaled up investment in sustainable agricultural intensification2. Recognition and greater awareness of the economic and social value ofnatural assets3. ‘Climate-smart’ approaches to rural development4. Greater attention to the risk and resilience from environment andnatural resource-related shocks5. Engagement in value chains in a way that drives green growth 6. Improved governance of natural assets through strengthened land tenure and community led empowerment for the rural poor 7. Livelihood diversification for sustainable natural resource use andclimate resilience 8. An inclusive gender approach and the full participation of indigenous peoples in managing natural resources 9. Rural smallholder communities to benefit from environment and climate finance10. Environmental commitment through IFAD’s own behaviours
    • 17. ENRM best practice statements• Crop production • Water • Infrastructure• Livestock • Fisheries and • Green• Value Chains Aquaculture Financing• Biodiversity • Forestry• Land • Energy
    • 18. LandIFAD will support and promote:(i)the continued strengthening of diverse and overlapping tenure/access systems;(ii)link local-level development planning with sustainable natural resources management and land rights, creating spaces for negotiations based on proper consultations with legitimate community leaders, land-use planning, and action on the landscape level;(iii)promote sustainable and pro poor land- based investments; and(iv)integrated land management at scale to manage tradeoffs and improve or maintain ecosystem service flows
    • 19. D. Implementation strategy
    • 20. Implementation – 5 years
    • 21. Implementation – 5 yearsOperations – scaling upand systematic integrationthrough concept to evaluation
    • 22. Implementation – 5 years Knowledge andOperations – scaling up Advocacy – stronger portfolioand systematic integration learning driving increasedthrough concept to evaluation implementation support, innovation and communications
    • 23. Implementation – 5 years Knowledge andOperations – scaling up Advocacy – stronger portfolioand systematic integration learning driving increasedthrough concept to evaluation implementation support, innovation and communicationsResource mobilization– additional supplementaryfunding secured to supportintegration into portfolio
    • 24. Implementation – 5 years Knowledge andOperations – scaling up Advocacy – stronger portfolioand systematic integration learning driving increasedthrough concept to evaluation implementation support, innovation and communicationsResource mobilization Organisation – internal– additional supplementary structure, organisationalfunding secured to support incentives and demonstratedintegration into portfolio leadership
    • 25. KM and advocacyPartnerships • UN family – incl RBAs • Farmers’ organizations, indigenous peoples groups,Country level: international civil society• National stakeholders, • Research centres and think including central tanks governments, local • Donor community (i.e. institutions, community- GDPRD) based organizations • IFIs• Harmonization with donor community (bilateral and multilateral) Resource mobilisation• Regional and global • Global Environment Facility, including GEF Trust Fund networks and GEF-managed UNFCCC funds • Direct co-financing • Adaptation Fund • Private sector and foundations • Donors and IFIs
    • 26. Thank you

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