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Collaboration Between ACSAD & IFAD, Dr. Khaled R. BenMahmoud, ACSAD

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  • 1. Collaboration Between ACSAD & IFAD Workshop on Knowledge and Technology Exchange for Enhanced Quality of IFAD/ICARDA Operations in the NENA Region Aleppo, Syria 26-29/10/2009 Dr. Khaled R. BenMahmoud (ACSAD)
  • 2. Collaboration
    • The Collaboration between ACSAD and IFAD dates back to 1980 when the first cooperation agreement was signed between the two parties.
    • It was a Fruitful Collaboration to Achieve a Number of Success Stories in Agricultural Research and Projects which cover different important domains to IFAD , ACSAD as well as to the Arab Countries.
  • 3.
    • Highlighting the Achievements made through Previous Collaboration
  • 4. (1) The Project for Development of Wheat and Barley Productivity in the Arid Areas
    • 1980 – 1986
    • Funding Agency : IFAD
    • Grant Amount : $ 5,228,000
    • Participating Countries:(4)
    • Syria, Jordan, Algeria, and Morocco.
  • 5. Project Objectives
    • Dissemination the cultivation of improved varieties of wheat and barley developed by ACSAD in the targeted Arab Countries.
    • Transfer the improved agricultural practices to the small farmers.
  • 6. Project Outcomes
    • Adoption of some ACSAD varieties from both wheat and barely.
    • Dissemination of the improved agricultural practices package, which are suitable for those varieties under rainfed and irrigated farming systems.
    Type Country Bread Wheat Durum Wheat Barley ACSAD Name Adopted Name ACSAD name Adopted name ACSAD name Adopted name Syria -- -- ACSAD 65 ACSAD 65 ACSAD 176 ACSAD 176 Jordan -- -- ACSAD 65 ACSAD 65 ACSAD 60 ACSAD 68 ACSAD 60 ACSAD 68 Algeria ACSAD 59 Hadna -- -- ACSAD 60, ACSAD 68 ACSAD 176 Bahriya, Ramada Nailiya Morocco ACSAD 59 ACSAD 59 ACSAD 65 ACSAD 65 ACSAD 60, ACSAD 68 ACSAD 176 ACSAD 60, ACSAD 68 ACSAD 176
  • 7. (2) The Regional Project for Rainfed Farming Systems Research
    • 1986 – 1990
    • Funding Agency : IFAD
    • Grant Amount :
    • $ 2,246.000
    • Participating
    • Countries: (6)
    • Syria, Jordan, Algeria, Morocco, Yemen, and Libya
  • 8. Project Objectives
      • Transfer of the newly – improved cultural practices to the farmers' fields.
      • Introduction of food and forage legumes in the crop rotation instead of fallow to sustain soil fertility and increase the economic return.
      • Achievement the integration between plant and animal production.
  • 9. Project Outcomes
    • Dissemination the recently – developed improved agricultural practices in the fields of farmers in the targeted countries.
    • Increase farmer's income and enhance the economic return via the implementation of the appropriate crop rotations.
    • Increase the production of cereals by 25 %.
    • Conducting several workshops and filed days for technicians and farmers to show the impacts of such recently – developed improved cultural practices on yield increase.
  • 10. (3) Project for Rainfed Agriculture Development and Technology Transfer to Farmers
    • 1998 – 2000
    • Funding Agencies : IFAD and AFESD
    • Grant Amount : $ 660.000
    • Participating Countries:(5)
    • Syria, Jordan, Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia.
  • 11. Project Objectives
    • Increase the productivity of small cereals.
    • Intensification of the cropping systems.
    • Distribution of the income resources through dissemination of the integrated cropping systems, and reducing of unemployment.
  • 12. Project Outcomes
    • Adoption of the integrated improved cultural practices package ( Seeding rate, Fertilization , crop rotation , and weed control) and enhancing of the crop production.
    • Intensifying of the cropping systems by introducing of the food and forage legumes instead of fallow.
  • 13.
    • Technology transfer and the use of agricultural techniques has led to:
          • the improvement of the performance of ACSAD varieties,
          • helped in stabilizing their productivity and
          • reduced the gap between their average productivity at the research centers and that of the farmers’ fields.
  • 14. Performance of ACSAD
    • ACSAD continued to develop promising varieties and lines of durum wheat, bread wheat and barley which are high-yielding, tolerant of biotech and a- biotech stresses and characterized by desired specifications.
  • 15. ACSAD’s Varieties and promising lines of durum wheat (16) Varieties Hybridize Year Average Productivity kg/ha AC 65 1973-1974 2500-2850 AC 357 1981-1982 2800-3250 AC 1103 1987-1988 2750-3050 AC 1105 1987-1988 2950-3350 AC 1107 1987-1988 2800-3200 AC 1129 1988-1989 2700-3050 AC 1187 1991-1992 2750-3100 AC 1229 1994-1995 2850-3200 AC 1245 1995-1996 2850-3200 AC 1261 1997-1998 2900-3250 AC 1265 1997-1998 2800-3200 AC 1273 1997-1998 2850-3250 AC 1275 1997-1998 2900-3250 AC 1277 1998-1999 2950-3300 AC 1287 1998-1999 2700-3050 AC 1289 1998-1999 2750-3150
  • 16. ACSAD’s Varieties and promising lines of Bread wheat (15) Varieties Hybridize Year Average Productivity kg/ha AC 59 1972-1973 2650-2950 AC 67 1972-1973 2600-2950 AC 883 1987-1988 2800-3250 AC 885 1987-1988 2850-3250 AC 899 1988-1989 2800-3250 AC 901 1988-1989 2950-3300 AC 969 1990-1991 2800-3200 AC 981 1992-1993 2950-3300 AC 1059 1994-1995 2900-3300 AC 1063 1994-1995 2900-3250 AC 1069 1995-1996 2950-3350 AC 1071 1995-1996 2850-3350 AC 1079 1997-1998 2800-3250 AC 1103 1998-1999 2750-3150 AC 1115 1998-1999 2950-3350
  • 17. ACSAD’s Varieties and promising lines of Barely (14) Varieties Hybridize Year Average Productivity kg/ha AC 60 1972-1973 2300-2800 AC 68 1972-1973 2500-3000 AC176 1972-1973 2500-3000 AC 1182 1984-1985 2500-3000 AC 1420 1986-1987 2500-3000 AC 1468 1987-1988 2600-3100 AC 1470 1988-1989 2500-3000 AC 1568 1995-1996 2500-3000 AC 1586 1996-1997 3000-3500 AC 1602 1996-1997 3000-3500 AC 1614 1997-1998 2250-2750 AC 1630 1997-1998 3000-3500 AC 1632 1997-1998 2500-3000 AC 1640 1998-1999 2600-3100
  • 18.
    • Performance of ACSAD’s wheat varieties and lines at the Arab agricultural experiment stations
  • 19. Varieties adopted by the Arab countries Type Country Bread Wheat Durum Wheat Barley ACSAD Name Adopted Name ACSAD name Adopted name ACSAD name Adopted name Syria ACSAD 885 ACSAD 901 Douma2 Douma4 ACSAD1105 ACSAD1229 Douma 1 presented to the releasing committee - - Libya ACSAD 901 ACSAD 885 ACSAD 901 ACSAD 885 ACSAD 857 Bohouth 107 ACSAD1420 ACSAD1230 ACSAD1420 Maimoun Algeria - - ACSAD 1107 Presented to the releasing committee - - Yemen ACSAD1097 ACSAD1119 Sham1 Sham 2 ACSAD1119 ACSAD 1169 Naaeem Bohouth 5
  • 20. Performance of ACSAD 1105 of durum wheat in the Arab Countries ( Kg/ha) (2002 – 2008) Years Lebanon Jordon Saudi Egypt Tunisia AC 1105 Check AC 1105 Check AC 1105 Check AC 1105 Check AC 1105 Check 2002 6256 5811 -- -- -- -- 10898 10060 -- -- 2003 2500 2400 3350 3430 -- -- 9095 6667 -- -- 2004 2344 2456 -- -- -- -- 7476 7393 -- -- 2005 3156 2856 2985 1688 -- -- 3594 3455 -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- 1446 1027 7869 6940 -- -- 2007 1628 1928 1419 1257 1859 848 8826 8039 3163 2828 2008 4477 3700 471 503 1829 1800 2301 2092 -- -- Average 3393 3191 2056 1719 1711 1225 7151 6378 3163 2828
  • 21. Performance of ACSAD 1105 in the Arab Countries ( Kg/ha) (2002 – 2008)
  • 22. Performance of ACSAD 901 of bread wheat in the Arab Countries ( Kg/ha) (2002 – 2005) Years Lebanon Jordon Egypt Morocco Yemen AC 901 Check AC 901 Check AC 901 Check AC 901 Check AC 901 Check 2002 6422 6206 -- -- 1971 1670 -- -- 1433 872 2003 3294 2500 1060 1040 8817 6583 4767 4444 -- -- 2004 2228 1594 -- -- 6367 4867 -- -- -- -- 2005 3544 2778 2713 2263 7817 7167 -- -- -- -- Average 3872 3269 1886 1651 6218 5071 4767 4444 1433 872
  • 23. Performance of ACSAD 901 of bread wheat in the Arab Countries ( Kg/ha) (2002 – 2005)
  • 24. Short period of growth (110 day) High temperature (25-30 degrees) Performance of ACSAD varieties of durum wheat in Sudan ( Kg/ha) (2007 – 2009) Increase % Average 2008 -2009 2006 -2007 ACSAD Varieties 13.5 3400 -- 3400 AC 1277 10.3 2559 2220 2898 AC 1105 31.8 3329 3360 3298 AC 1311 27.0 3210 2963 3457 AC 1315 2525 1946 3104 Check
  • 25. Performance of ACSAD varieties of durum wheat in Saudi Arabia ( Kg/ha) (2005 – 2009) Short period of growth (110 day) High temperature (25-30 degrees) Average 2008 - 2009 2005 - 2006 ACSAD Varieties 1886.5 -- 1761 AC 1271 1708.5 -- 1413 AC 1289 2348 3740 1446 AC 1105 1663.5 -- 1496 AC 1277 848 Sham 3 1027 Foch-1
  • 26.  
  • 27. Performance of ACSAD 1169 of durum wheat in Yemen as compared with local variety ( Kg/ha) (2001 – 2003)
  • 28. Performance of ACSAD Varieties of bread wheat in Sakha experimental station in Egypt as compared with local variety ( Kg/ha) (2005 – 2007) Kg/ha Varieties 4683 AC 1115 4666 AC 1061 4016 AC1095 9000 AC 1103 8716 AC 1107 8766 AC 1093 8550 Sakha 94
  • 29. The following table shows the average performance of the bread wheat variety ACSAD 885 and the durum wheat variety ACSAD 1105 during the period from 2003 to 2009. Both varieties are registered and released for cultivation in Syria and Libya, in the mean time they showed promising results in certain Arab countries. ACSAD varieties Growing season Bread Wheat ACSAD 885 Durum Wheat ACSAD 1105 Rainfed Kg/ha Irrigated Kg/ha Rainfed Kg/ha Irrigated Kg/ha 2008/2009 3200 6200 3500 6800 2006/2007 2850 7100 2800 6800 2005/2006 3400 6800 3150 6950 2004/2005 3500 6850 3150 6200 2003/2004 3350 6900 3500 6950 Over All Average 3260 6770 3220 6740
  • 30. We can conclude
    • During the past five years, ACSAD’s bread wheat and durum wheat lines approved once again their out yielding capacity over the local varieties under the rainfed as well as the irrigated conditions.
    • This apparently was due to the fact that they were bred to have wide adaptation.
    • Our field data and reports indicate that the average yield of these lines is :
      • Under the 250-350 mm rainfall ranges between 2500-3500 kg.ha-1 , this of course depends largely on the amount as well as the distribution of rainfall.
      • Under irrigation, however, the average yield was reported to range from 5000 to 7500 kg.ha-1 .
  • 31.
    • These figures represent averages are taken from the Arab Yield Trials conducted in a number of Arab Agricultural Experiment Stations.
    • Under wider cultivation , however, productivity may decline by about 10% in experiment stations and by 25-35% in farmers’ field.
  • 32. New implemented project: The Wheat Production Improvement in Arab Countries
    • Objectives:
    • Improvement of wheat production under both the rainfed and irrigated environments, in addition to supporting food security in the Arab countries.
    • Secure improved high quality seeds of ACSAD’s high yielding wheat lines for the participating Arab countries.
    • Participating countries ( 11) : Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Tunis, Algeria, Morocco, Sudan and Libya.
    • Financial support: The project is financed by the Islamic Bank for Development and ACSAD.
    • Project duration: Three years (2009 – 2012).
  • 33. (4) Date Palm Research and Development Network
    • 1994 – 1998
    • Funding Agency : IFAD. IsDB and AFESD
    • Amount of grant : $ 2.755.000
    • Participating Countries: (11)
    • Syria , Egypt, Algeria, Morocco, Sudan, Mauritania, Sultanate Oman. Bahrain, Emirates. Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia.
  • 34. Project objective
    • Development the cultivation of date palm tree and date production in the Arab countries.
  • 35. Project Outcomes(1):
    • Conducting a series of studies about date palm cropping systems, revealing the constraints and providing the suitable recommendations.
    • Providing of technical consultation in the filed of tissue culture, insect and diseases control for several countries: Sudan, Mauritania, Sultanate Oman and Syria .
    • Providing of financial support (1.5 million US$) in form of equipments and chemicals for the participating countries .
    • Holding of 11 training courses and workshops for more than 243 participants / trainees.
  • 36. Project Outcomes(2):
    • Conducting of socio- economic studies to analyze the cropping systems in the targeted areas, and assessment of the socio-economic consequences for the technical constraints that might face the date palm sector in the targeted Arab countries.
    • Study marketing, processing and the way of making use of the date by products in Egypt and Morocco.
    • Conducting two regional symposiums during 1977 and 1998 and printing complete proceedings for them .
  • 37. (5) The Camel Applied Research & Development Network (CARDN)
    • First Phase: 1996 - 2000
    • Second Phase: 2001- 2004
    • Funding Agency : IFAD , IsDB and French government
    • Amount of grant :
    • IFAD: $ 1,500,000 (Ph.1)
    • $ 1,200,000 (Ph.2)
    • IDB: $ 1,000,000 (Ph.1)
    • French government: $ 50,000 (Ph.1)
    • Participating Countries: (12)
    • Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, Sudan, Syria, and Tunisia. Jordan and Yemen, jointed the group in the second phase of the project.
  • 38. Project Objectives
    • Ensuring sustainable use of dry rangeland by camel keeping of mainly non-sedentary pastoralists, avoiding further degradation of land and vegetation, thereby ensuring the continuation of the pastoral production system.
    • Stimulating research and development activities on camel husbandry in order to improve milk and meat production and develop marketing channels of camel products.
    • To coordinate research and development activities among member countries and to document, disseminate and publish information with regard to camel production.
  • 39. Organization and Administration of the Network
    • The network operated through national coordinators in 12 member countries.
    • National coordinators met every year and made recommendations for the network activities.
    • Network countries were selectively involved in different activities and financial support was provided for projects falling under CARDN program.
    • The network is operated through national coordinators.
    • Recommendation for the network operations are made through the annual general assembly and an executive committee .
    • Separate units for camel research and development have been established at ministerial level in network countries.
    • National networks for camel scientists have been established at university level in network countries.
  • 40. CARDN Achievements (1)
    • Contributing in the establishment
    • of the National Committee for Camel Research and Development Network in each member country.
    • Encouraging the establishment of a special service for camel husbandry at the Agricultural Ministries, research stations and universities levels in member countries.
    • Establishing the Association of Camel Breeders in order to get them involved in making decision related to camel production.
  • 41. CARDN Achievements (2)
    • Specialized courses on camel production were delivered in major universities and research structures were developed in several national research centers.
    • About 40 research projects were carried out in member countries and these projects documented in about 75 publications.
    • The network organized about 40 workshops and seminars on camel production and about 15 training courses on handling and processing of camel products.
    • CARDN has published 20 Camel Newsletters containing most of the CARDN publications
  • 42. CARDN Achievements (3)
    • Contributing in furnishing scientific equipment for camel labs and research stations in member countries.
    • Supplying 4 member countries with artificial insemination and embryo transfer laboratories.
    • Supplying 4 member countries with mobile veterinary clinics.
  • 43. CARDN Achievements (4)
    • Creating a camel web site: acsad.org/camels
    • Establishing the Journal of Camel Science to publish the scientific papers of the network.
    • Developing cooperation with other networks such as the International Society of Camel research and development (ISOCARD)
    • Inviting Gulf countries and some African and Asian countries to joint CARDN.
  • 44. Topics to be investigated by network member countries in the third phase.
    • Camel meat and milk processing and preservation to facilitate their marketing.
    • Valorization of camel wool, hair and hides and improvement of their processing.
    • Improving the efficiency of the Artificial Insemination technology in camel.
    • Developing prophylactic schemes to combat parasite diseases such as scabies and ticks.
  • 45. Proposed project : Exploring the camel potential as dairy animal under the pastoral production system
    • The one-humped camel population in the word estimated to average 18 millions heads providing about 3500 TT of milk and 425 TT of meat annually.
    • Countries with high camel population such as Somalia, Sudan, Djibouti, Ethiopia and Mauritania are countries which suffering the most from hunger and poverty.
  • 46. The objectives of the Project
    • To explore the potential of camel as a dairy animal providing milk with special nutritional and medicinal values under the pastoral production system.
    • To create better environmental conditions for producing, processing and marketing the milk which will ultimately help to improve the living standards of the pastoral communities.
  • 47. Activities Proposed
    • Workshops
    • Socio-economic assessment of camel milk supply chains
    • Knowledge sharing
    This project was submitted to IFAD for financial support on Feb.2007.
  • 48. (6) The Program for the Use of Saline and Brackish Water in Agriculture in the Countries of North Africa
    • 2002 – 2005
    • Funding Agency : IFAD
    • Grant Amount : $ 400.000
    • Participating Countries (3) Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya.
  • 49. Project Objectives
    • Improve the productivity of irrigated systems through adapted and efficient use of saline water by the farmers.
    • Improve the farmer’s income by new saline water management and adapted irrigated systems.
    • Improve the capacity of the technical staff and researchers in the field of saline water use.
    • Produce local norms and references on saline water use (>6 dS/m).
  • 50. Implementation: Location & Country Participation Implemented in three provinces: Ouargla, Biskra, and Wadi. 15 Farmers and 3 Research stations. 45 participants (experts, engineers, and technicians). Algeria Implemented in two provinces: Ghirawan, and Mahdia. 6 Farmers and 2 Research stations. 12 participants (experts, engineers, and technicians). Tunisia Implemented in three provinces: Tripoli, Jefarah, and Musrata. 27 Farmers and 3 Research stations. 30 participants (experts, engineers, and technicians ). Libya
  • 51. Barley – A Winter crop irrigated by saline water as a supplementary irrigation in – Bou Hajla Pepper – A summer crop irrigated excessively by saline water – Bou Hajla Barely cultivation irrigated with saline water in Alagfian – ITDAS station ( March 2003) In Algeria
  • 52. Artichoke cultivation in year 2004 / 2005 in ITDAS experimental station in Leatia. Sesbania acculata cultivation in ITDAS experimental station (Alagfian,). This legume crop can tolerate irrigation water salinity up to 15 dS/m and soil salinity up to 20 dS/m
  • 53. Juanilo Triticale variety cultivated in farm field of Kasem Jamal farm in Mleli area in Biskra province (2004)
  • 54. In Tunisia supplementary irrigated by saline water( 5g/l) Barely: Potato
    • Activities:
    • Irrigation scheduled
    • Monitoring of salinity of soil and irrigated water.
    • supplementary irrigated by saline water for barely and potato.
    • Irrigation of pepper by saline water in the field and green house.
    • Economical evaluation of the production.
    إنتاج 4.2 طن / هـ من الشعير وبمياه مالحة 5 غ / ل - ري تكميلي
  • 55. In Libya ( Misrata ) ( Tajura ) Barely Cultivation : supplementary irrigated by saline water (Farmers)
  • 56. The green yield and dry yield (ton/ha) of alfalfa for 33 cuts as a function of water quality Alfalfa Cultivation : irrigated by saline water (Farmers) Yield (Ton/ha)
  • 57. Training & Workshops Workshop Field visites Participants Training
  • 58. Awareness and Field days Libya Algeria Barley cultivation in Tajora (2004) Barley cultivation in Misrata (2003) Alfalfa cultivation in Algfian (2004) Spices cultivation in Eloud (2004)
  • 59. Farmer Exchange Visits Algerian farmers visit to Libya – March 2004 farmers from Libya visited Algeria – April 2005
  • 60. Project impact
    • Land management of Farmers (improved).
    • Farmer’s income (improved)
    • New Crops (introduced) .
    • No. of Researchers (increased).
    • Salinity Studies (increased).
    • No. of Publications (12).
    • Transfer Technology to other Arab countries ( Syria , Saudi Arabia , Kuwait , Morocco, and Yemen).
  • 61. Salinity Threshold for selected crops (ds/m) Salinity Threshold : The maximum salinity of the root zone (St. Ext.) that does not show a significant decrease in crop production . crop Salinity Threshold cotton 4.8 corn 3.9 vetch 3.0 ً Wheat- grain 4.4 Wheat- straw 7.2 ً Barely - grain 7.0 Barely - straw 7.1 ِِِ Alfalfa-dry 6.4 Tomato 3.3 ً Watermelon - Y 1.9 Watermelon - R 1.4 Paper 2.1 Potato 0.6 Broccoli 2.9
  • 62. Yield (T/ha) as a function of irrigation water salinity (dS/m) from Tunisia
  • 63. Yield (T/ha) as a function of irrigation water salinity (dS/m) from Syria and Libya
  • 64. Maximum profit as a function of ECiw ECiw (dS/m ) Wheat Cotton Tomato Corn Barley Potato Medic Maximum Profit (1000SL/ha)
  • 65. Continuation of the Program
    • Under the request of a number of Arab countries to continue this program, ACSAD has summit a proposed project document to IFAD (Jan.2007) to finance the continuation of the activities of the program in Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya,
    • and expanded it to other desired countries including Syria , Morocco , Yemen. The Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait may also join the program.
    • ACASD decided to continue this program in Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Syria , and Morocco ( the project is now financed by ACSAD(50%) + country involved(50%) ) . Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait are in the processes of negotiations.
  • 66. (7) Project for the Sustainable Use of Groundwater Resources to Improve the Environmental Conditions of the Oases in North Africa
    • 2007 – 2008
    • Funding Agency : IFAD
    • Grant Amount : $ 200.000
    • Participating Countries(2)
    • Algeria, and Tunisia.
  • 67. Project Objectives
    • Establish partnerships with land and water users in the Oases in selected countries of the NENA region (Algeria, Tunisia) to promote technology packages to handle water problems and to move towards a sustainable use of natural resources.
  • 68. Major water problems facing oasis communities رتف
      • heavy extraction of groundwater from deep aquifers.
      • low efficiency of water use, mainly in irrigation.
      • increasing salinity of groundwater.
      • poor water allocation practices.
      • .
      • Deterioration of the quality shallow groundwater aquifer, due to contaminations by irrigation returns flow and local communities’ wastewater.
  • 69. Location of Study area in Algeria and major aquifers Distribution of boreholes Development of Ground water extraction1950-2000
  • 70. causes of the rising of groundwater table in the Algerian oasis .
  • 71. Aspects of Oasis deterioration in Southern Algeria due to poor management of groundwater Increasing of groundwater level Drainage system is blocked
  • 72. Rising of the groundwater table at Tamasine
  • 73. The Oasis of Tozeur in Southern Tunisia
  • 74. The oasis in Tozeur is equipped with irrigation water distribution system
  • 75. Success stories The use of the drainage water (salinity 10 g/l) in irrigation of Forest trees.)
  • 76. Proposed project : The sustainable use of the groundwater resources to improve farmers’ livelihoods and environmental conditions in the Arab oases.
    • Objective :
    • The goal of the project is to improve water management and water use efficiency and the livelihood of vulnerable groups in selected Oases in the Arab region. This will contribute to poverty reduction and protect the fragile environment of the oasis.
    This project was also submitted to IFAD for financial support on Feb.2007.
  • 77. ACSAD also cooperated with IFAD in :
    • carrying out and organizing many training programs, and seminars within the framework of the IFAD-funded projects in the Arab countries.
  • 78.
    • ACSAD is very interested to strengthen its cooperation with IFAD, toward a mutual objective for poverty reduction and an improvement in quality of life among small farms in the Arab countries.
  • 79. Proposed Projects & Concept Ideas for Future Cooperation Between ACSAD and IFAD These were submitted to be considered through the competitive screening process for IFAD grants
  • 80.
    • Building Cross – Border Understanding and early preventive responses to Arab infection in Farm Animals in Near East and North Africa (NENA) courtiers.
    • Improving the utilization of Agricultural and Agro – Industrial by products in animal feeding in Arab countries.
    • Improvement of Barley Crop production in the Arab countries.
    • Project for the cultivation of forage trees and shrubs as alternatives for traditional forages grown in the Arab countries.
    • Integrated use of water resources for agriculture sustainability in the Arab word.
  • 81. The safe use of the swage and treated wastewater in Arab agriculture
    • Objective :
    • The overall objective of this project is the safe use of treated wastewater in irrigation. This will be done by resource-poor farmers (on-farm trials) in three locations of the proposed countries aiming to improve the livelihood of these poor farmers in a sustainable way.
    This project will be implemented this year in three Arab country ( Jordon, Tunisia ,and Bahrain ) and is financed by ACSAD and ICBA. Treated waste water Sewage Sludge
  • 82. Dissemination of Biogas Technology in Arab Rural Areas
    • Rural villagers are suffering from the pollution of animal & human waste, where they have to collect and threw them away from the house daily,
    • Animal and human waste have the potential to contribute excess nutrients, pathogens, organic materials, solids and odorous which pollute the Environment.
    • Biogas Technology is an anaerobic digestion of animal wastes, human wastes and agriculture residues in absence of air and oxygen. Three outcomes of that digestion are produced:
      • Enough quantity of Biogas ( 65% CH4 & 35% CO2) to be used in household for cooking.
      • Clean Organic fertilizer, could be used directly in the farm,
      • Clean rural environment
    In Syria , Sudan ,and Yemen . In 2009 , 22 family units & 6 medium units was implemented in different location in Syria.
  • 83. Thanks