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Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs
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Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs

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This was originally delivered as a session for the CASE District 1 Conference: Jan 27, 2011 …

This was originally delivered as a session for the CASE District 1 Conference: Jan 27, 2011

Is your institution’s website in need of an overhaul, but you simply do not have the time or resources to make it happen? We’ll walk you through an actual site audit for a prestigious higher ed institution, and showcase the evolution that can occur in a matter of weeks. By taking a look at the college’s original website, we’ll give you a sense of what can and should be improved upon, then fast forward to the refreshed website, to review what changes were implemented—-in under 12 weeks time.

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  • 1. 2011 CASE district i: Making the connection<br />Website ER: Rapid Refresh vs. Total Redesign for Triaging Immediate Needs<br />
  • 2. Website ER: Refresh vs. Redesign<br />“Is your institution’s website in need of an overhaul, but you simply do not have the time or resources to make it happen? We’ll walk you through an actual site audit for a prestigious higher ed institution, and showcase the evolution that can occur in a matter of weeks. By taking a look at the college’s original website, we’ll give you a sense of what can and should be improved upon, then fast forward to the refreshed website, to review what changes were implemented—in under 12 weeks time. “<br />
  • 3. Agenda<br />Introductions / About us – 3m<br />Refresh: what and why? – 3m<br />Refresh vs. Redesign – 3m<br />Case Study: Bryn Mawr – 30m<br /><ul><li>Situation
  • 4. Process
  • 5. Results
  • 6. Lessons learned from the Client
  • 7. Lessons learned from the Designers</li></ul>Prerequisites for Success – 3m<br />Case Study 2: Plymouth State University – 5m<br />Conclusion/Caveats – 3m<br />Questions – 10m<br />
  • 8. About Us<br />Jenny Rickard<br />Chief Enrollment & Communications Officer<br />Bryn Mawr College<br />Alen Yen<br />President/Creative Director<br />iFactory, a division of RDW Group<br />
  • 9. General information<br /><ul><li>One of the original “Seven Sisters” located 10 miles outside of Philadelphia
  • 10. 1,300 undergraduate students over 50% of whom are students of color or international students; 400 graduate students
  • 11. Cross-registration with Haverford, Swarthmore, and the University of Pennsylvania.</li></ul>Some distinguishing characteristics<br /><ul><li>The first of the women’s colleges to offer education through the Ph.D.
  • 12. The first student self-government association in the United States.
  • 13. Among the top ten of all colleges and universities in the United States in terms of the proportion of students (male and female) who go on to earn the Ph.D.
  • 14. Women at Bryn Mawr major in math and science at a rate that is 4 times the national average.
  • 15. Bryn Mawr ranks 2nd among all colleges and universities in the proportion of women majoring in math. The sheer number of women majoring in math at Bryn Mawr exceeds both MIT and CalTech.</li></li></ul><li>About iFactory<br />Founded in 1992, iFactory is Boston’s longest-serving digital media agency. We create innovative, practical media solutions custom-tailored to improve how you communicate and transact with your students, prospective enrollees, alumni, faculty and staff. <br />Clients include:<br />Boston University<br />Bryn Mawr<br />Cornell<br />Harvard<br />MIT<br />New York University<br />Roger Williams University<br />Tufts University<br />University of Chicago<br />University of Illinois Chicago<br />University of North Carolina<br />University of Pennsylvania<br />University of Virginia<br />Wheelock College<br />Yale University<br />
  • 16. Refresh: what and why?<br />A refresh involves doing a quick expert review of what’s wrong with your site, and then executing a plan to fix everything you can within an allotted timeframe.<br />A refresh differs from the typical website redesign project in that it bypasses a number of best practices which ensure long-term success and the best quality of solutions<br />Metaphor: kitchen remodelling vs. refreshing<br />Same appliances<br />Same cabinetry<br />Repainting<br />New knobs and handles<br />The primary driver to do a refresh vs. a redesign is timeframe. Budget can also be a factor.<br />
  • 17. Refresh vs. Redesign: change in scope<br />TYPICAL REDESIGN PROCESS: 7 – 9 months<br />Brand messaging and positioning<br />Website strategy and discovery<br />Expert Review<br />Stats analysis<br />Focus groups<br />Stakeholder interviews<br />Competitive audit<br />Strategic brief<br />Usability test on existing site<br />Technical audit<br />Information Architecture<br />Sitemap – reorganize hierarchical structure of all content<br />Wireframe – redesign all user experience and navigation schemes for best practices<br />Usability test of proposed solutions<br />Functional specification<br />Art Direction<br />Look and Feel<br />Code templates<br />Institute new site-wide technical solution<br />RAPID REFRESH: 1 – 2 months<br />Brand messaging and positioning<br />Website strategy and discovery<br />Expert Review<br />Stats analysis<br />Focus groups<br />Stakeholder interviews<br />Competitive audit<br />Strategic brief<br />Usability test on existing site<br />Technical audit<br />Information Architecture<br />Sitemap – adjust nomenclature for best practice, but leave structure intact<br />Wireframe – remove troublesome elements and modify some elements of navigation<br />Usability test of proposed solutions<br />Functional specification<br />Art Direction<br />Look and Feel<br />Code templates<br />Institute new technical solution<br />
  • 18. Case study: Bryn Mawr: situation<br />Situation<br /><ul><li>Had completed a full-scale redesign by committee of the web site two years earlier</li></ul>Consensus agreement that the web site was not meeting needs from an aesthetic and high-level functional perspective<br />Specific Time-Sensitive Goal: 125th Anniversary<br />Process<br /><ul><li>Setting scope – what the project was and was not
  • 19. Core project team – understanding everyone’s roles
  • 20. Agreement that Core project team could make the decisions
  • 21. Detailed RFP outlining the project - visual and technical requirements
  • 22. Selecting a partner that understood the difference between a “refresh” and an “overhaul”
  • 23. Communication with the community and “web stewards” as a way of including them in the process
  • 24. Making sure offices and departments would not have to do any work!</li></li></ul><li>Case study: Bryn Mawr: situation<br />
  • 25. Case study: Bryn Mawr: Process<br />Tools<br />Client extranet<br />Discovery<br /><ul><li>Expert review
  • 26. Interim brand positioning and messaging led by Mary Ann Hill
  • 27. Sitemap and wireframing</li></ul>Design<br /><ul><li>Typical art direction process
  • 28. Typical look and feel process</li></ul>Implementation<br /><ul><li>Pass off to internal team at Bryn Mawr</li></li></ul><li>Case study: Bryn Mawr: Results<br />
  • 29. Case study: Bryn Mawr: Lessons Learned from the Client<br /><ul><li>Great project managers on both sides (people who know how to get stuff done!)
  • 30. Clearly defined roles
  • 31. Existing “interim” institutional messages to incorporate into new design
  • 32. Sticking to the schedule and meeting all internal deadlines
  • 33. Not being too obsessed with including the entire community, but making sure the changes were being communicated and offering ways for them to contribute (eg., photo contest)
  • 34. Creating a great team interaction: Bryn Mawr College Communications, Web Services, and iFactory
  • 35. Having fun</li></li></ul><li>Case study: Bryn Mawr: Lessons Learned from the Designers<br />Amazing client dedication<br />Manage of feedback cycles<br />Getting buy-in at the top<br />Involving Bryn Mawr web services team early and frequently was crucial<br />Invest in clean code and CSS!<br />
  • 36. Pre-requisites for success<br />Strong project leadership<br />Organized communications and interaction tools<br />Commitment to deadlines and feedback cycles<br />Clear path for improving messaging and positioning<br />Quality visual assets ready to go<br />Understanding phased commitment to improvement<br />Agreement by all that in this situation, perfect is the enemy of good<br />Additional case study: Plymouth State University<br />
  • 37. Conclusion / Caveats / Questions<br />Refresh is great for<br />time sensitive needs<br />aesthetic improvement<br />better brand communications<br />Redesign is required for<br />true improvement in usability<br />adherence to best practice<br />continuously successful, updated site<br />

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