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Achieving Behaviour Change: Birmingham City Council in partnership with Nectar
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Achieving Behaviour Change: Birmingham City Council in partnership with Nectar

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Steve Rose, Birmingham City Council: Achieving Behaviour Change: Birmingham City Council in partnership with Nectar

Steve Rose, Birmingham City Council: Achieving Behaviour Change: Birmingham City Council in partnership with Nectar

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  • 1. Achieving Behaviour ChangeBirmingham City Council in partnership with NectarSteve RoseHead of Strategic Research15th March 2012
  • 2. Corporate Strategy Team Policy Leadership Development Support Strategic Research Community Research Customer Engagement Knowledge
  • 3. Background• Be active & leisure pass scheme • Citizen information attitudes research • In depth waste profiling/analysis
  • 4. Partnership – Fleet and Waste – Sport and Leisure – Erdington Leisure Centre – Customer Knowledge
  • 5. The business case • IEWM sponsor match funded by BCC • Why Nectar…? • Cost benefit business model – Benefit of £150 per tonne of paper recycled – Income through increase leisure membership and activity • First scheme in UK using major private sector brand • Sep 11-Feb 12, further extended May 12 • Hypothesis: – h1: Use of nectar points to reward positive behaviours in recycling and leisure will increase recycling and leisure participation and cover the cost of the scheme.
  • 6. Communications
  • 7. Process - recycling 100 pts register25 pts per collection
  • 8. Process - leisure 25pts per activity 100pts new member 100pts direct debit
  • 9. Results so far….
  • 10. Recycling - registrations • 1,121 registered households - 140% of target • 26% of eligible households (28% Cotteridge, 23% Erdington) • 70% via online registration, 77% emails captured Following email campaign to increase registration
  • 11. Recycling - participation 100 6.0 3.9 5.0 Zero scan 7.5 Less than half 90 9.4 8.5 % Recycling Participation Half or more 3/4 or more 80 16.1 All 18.3 20.3 70 60 50 37.1 52.1 44.2 40 30 20 27.3 24.0 10 20.4 0 Cotteridge Erdington All
  • 12. Recycling – behaviour change Based on pre-trial monitoring: • 9% who didn’t recycle have registered and recycled at least three times • 6% who recycled sporadically have registered and recycled every time • Comparing pre-trial to mid-trial monitoring, 35% who didn’t recycle at all have now done so at least once.
  • 13. Leisure - registrations • 536 registrations • Represents 25% of all active leisure members at this centre • 19% are new leisure members • 23 Your Choice (Direct Debit) • 70% email capture rate
  • 14. Index (Activities per week)-100 0 150 200 250 300 350 -50 50 100 400 09 Oct 450 16 Oct 23 Oct 30 Oct 06 Nov 13 Nov 20 Nov Leisure - frequency 27 Nov 04 Dec 11 Dec 18 Dec 25 Dec 01 Jan Index (Activities per week) 08 Jan holidays New Year Christmas/ -100 -50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 15 Jan 09 Oct 16 Oct 22 Jan 23 Oct 30 Oct 29 Jan 06 Nov 05 F eb 13 Nov 20 Nov 12 F eb 27 Nov 04 Dec 19 F eb11 Dec During Trial Before Trial 18 Dec 26 F eb 25 Dec 01 Jan 04 Mar 08 Jan 15 Jan 22 Jan 29 Jan
  • 15. Press and media coverage• 45+ articles• Circulation 2.9m• PR value £180k Sep 11 - Jan 12
  • 16. Evaluation • Is there an appetite for this type of incentive scheme? • Can it effect Behaviour change? • Can it be rolled out across the city and how? • Will it generate income or at least sustain itself?
  • 17. Evaluation - Quantitative • Sources – Weekly BCC and Nectar reports – Recycling scans and tonnages – LeisureFlex transactions – Participation monitoring • Measures – Registrations – Frequency recycling and leisure activities – Behaviour change – Tonnages – Segments: Birmingham Segments and Green Aware
  • 18. Evaluation - Qualitative • Sources – Customer surveys and focus groups – Staff feedback – Lessons learnt log • Measures – Type of rewards and behaviours – Communications – Processes, e.g. registration – Behaviour change – Thoughts for the future
  • 19. Next Steps • Complete the trial (May 2012) • Evaluation (ongoing) • Roll out business case (June 2012) • Roll out tender (Summer) • Roll out delivery (Autumn/Winter 2012)
  • 20. Behaviour ChangeBirmingham City Council in partnership with NectarSteve RoseHead of Strategic Research0121 675 9566 / 07776 014 046steven.rose@birmingham.gov.uk

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