The Black Death in the 14th Century
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The Black Death in the 14th Century

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Main features of the black death at medieval times

Main features of the black death at medieval times

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  • 1. 1-What was the black death?2- Where did it happen?3-Causes4-Economic and demographicconsequences.5- Its reflection in art or literature6-Number of people killed
  • 2.  The Black Death was one of the worse pandemics in human history , with one peak in Europe between 1348 and 1350. Historians think it could have been an outbreak of bubonic plague caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, an argument supported by recent forensic research, although this view has been challenged by a number of scholars. When a person had the disease, it appeared an inflammation of the ganglions, causing a bundle with pus in the groin, armpits and neck, causing death within hours. This disease affected animals and was transmitted to humans. It was called like this because they appeared black spots (hemorrhages).
  • 3. WHERE DID IT HAPPEN? Most of the fourteenth century pandemic started maybe somewhere in Northern India, probably in the steppes of central Asia, from where it was carried west by the Mongol armies. The black death reached Europe by the route of Crimea, where the Genoese colony of Kaffa (now Feodosiya) was besieged by the Mongols. The story goes that the Mongols were throwing with catapults the infected corpses into the city. Refugees of Kaffa after the plague led to Messina, Genoa and Venice around 1347/1348. The plague spread from Italy throughout Europe affecting France, Spain, England (June 1348) and Britain, Germany, Hungary, Scandinavia and northwestern Russia finally.
  • 4. The first cause of the epidemicwas in Crimea where thesoldiers spread the plague(transmitted by rats or fleas)later the Genoese ships werespreading it through the portsof the Mediterranean.
  • 5. CONSEQUENCES
  • 6.  The painters make paintings whose theme is death, for example: Dance of death. There were two trends:(1) that some people believed it was a punishment from God. (2) They believed they were going to die and enjoyed life to the fullest. Boccaccio writes the Decameron where he describes the environment in Florence at the time of the Black Death.
  • 7. Art Literature
  • 8.  The Black Death ended with a quarter of Europes population. Approximately 30 million deaths occurred in Europe alone. Some villages were completely depopulated, with the few survivors fleeing and expanding further.
  • 9.  The Black Death ended with a quarter of Europes population. Approximately 30 million deaths occurred in Europe alone. Some villages were completely depopulated, with the few survivors fleeing and expanding further.