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Innovation in Healthcare
 

Innovation in Healthcare

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  • So, because I’m anthropologist I’m going to start, as anthropologists typically do, by creating a frame for what I want to talk about. \n\nThere are six frames that I want to invoke and for us all to have in mind as this talk progresses\n\n
  • Ethnography is a good way to understand the issues holistically, and get to the crux of the issues (but of course it is not the only way). To my mind, it’s value is in forcing us to think holistically, systemically and to uncover what is hidden in plain sight. If we want to create new stuff ethnography is often a good place to start. \n\n\n
  • 1.People not Users. First, and I recognise this quote my sound rather trite or obvious, or both, let’s be sure we understand that we are talking about people – their hopes, their dreams, their problems, illness, insecurities and concerns. It’s clearly a good thing to talk about users sometimes, but from my perspective it’s best to talk about people when we’re trying to understand what problem we’re trying to address, and users when we’re getting people to help us optimise a technology or design. \n\n
  • Systems – it’s really important that we understand innovation (in any field) in terms of systems. That means looking at all the actors and actants, ‘studying up’ to fathom the organising logic of those who control and how they wield power and make decisions.\n\n
  • Getting things done. We’re all, most of the time, trying to get things done and we’re doing innovation I think its really important to think about how we can help people achieve things they’re committed to making happen – though of course we might also be trying to help them do things that they don’t currently do. In any event, I think it’s helpful to think about enabling people to get things done. \n\n
  • \nSustaining Change – too often I suspect that what much innovation in healthcare fails to account for is the economics of the change implied by the innovation, who implements and what the cost of implementation will be…?\n Who pays?\n Implementation\n What sustains it?\n How will it work?\n\n\n
  • Innovation as ‘linking’ not always inventing. We tend to think about innovation as inventing new things. I prefer to think about it as linking the previously disconnected.\n\n
  • Having laid out these frames I want to talk about some of the work I’ve done – some of which goes some way to demonstrating, often by their absence rather than their presence, why I think these frames are important. \n\n
  • I ran a significant element of Intel’s effort to understand these issues in relations to ageing. \n\nOur first step was to conduct a major programme of work to understand the experience of ageing cross culturally and to use that to determine what opportunities might exist for a company like Intel. \n\n
  • This work took us to 8 countries, we conducted ethnography with older people and their carers (formal and informal), conducted policy and market desk research and interviewed health and policy specialists. \n\n
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  • We created many output from this work, including a map of opportunities that help navigate the product and business teams around where next. \nThis work also generated a significant number of concept ideas for further evaluation. \n\nThe work also led us to identify areas where we might need to know a lot more before working on potential solutions. One of these areas was mobility – in part because we saw that a major concern for older people related to them being ‘imprisoned’ in their own homes as they age.\n\n
  • We created many output from this work, including a map of opportunities that help navigate the product and business teams around where next. \nThis work also generated a significant number of concept ideas for further evaluation. \n\nThe work also led us to identify areas where we might need to know a lot more before working on potential solutions. One of these areas was mobility – in part because we saw that a major concern for older people related to them being ‘imprisoned’ in their own homes as they age.\n\n
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  • So we configured a project in partnership with an organisation which oversees 34 projects in Ireland which provide transportation services to older people. \n\n
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Innovation in Healthcare Innovation in Healthcare Presentation Transcript

  • Innovation in HealthcareTalk for MsC on HealthcareInnovationImperial Business School Simon Roberts, Ideas Bazaar 9th February 2011
  • Hello• 1996-2000: The satellite TV and consumer revolution in north India• 2000-05: The UK’s first ethnographic research consultancy• 2005-2011: Led Intel’s European research and design efforts on ageing and independent living• Now: Consulting, start-up for connected ageing, leading older people’s strategy for Raceonline 2012.
  • Five Thoughts toFrame This Talk
  • A Commitment to Understanding If you want to understandhow a lion hunts, dont go to the zoo. Go to the jungle. AG Lafley - CEO of Procter & Gamble
  • People not Users“People, not users, inhabitthe world. A ‘user’ issomething that designerscreate.”Redstrom
  • Systems
  • Getting Things Done
  • Sustaining Change• Who pays?• Implementation• What sustains it?• How will it work?
  • Innovation = Invention?
  • Innovation for Ageing
  • Few people identifythemselves as either sick orold. The key is to providetechnology that peoplerecognise as helping themto do what they want,rather than reminding themthat they are no longercapable.
  • Monitoring and earlyintervention are useful,but people often are in astate of healthy denialabout ageing and thusmay not embrace suchsolutions.
  • Ageing adults want tocontinue to feel usefulproductive and engagedwith family andcommunity, withoutfeeling they are a burden.
  • The inability to take careof one’s own home orgarden, to buy groceriesand prepare meals andmove about thecommunity are factorswhich can seriouslyimpact an ageing person’sability to live the life theydesire
  • Health is defined throughinteractions andnegotiations amongvarious people. Cultural,social and politicalsystems also shapeattitudes and behavioursrelated to health.
  • “One of the greatest challenges or losses thatwe face as older adults, frankly, is not aboutour health, but it’s actually about our socialnetwork deteriorating on us, because ourfriends get sick, our spouse passes away,friends pass away, or we move”“The new future of old age is about staying insociety...and staying very connected.”Joseph F. Coughlin, Director of the AgeLab, MIT
  • Transportation and Mobility for Older People inRural Ireland
  • • ßß
  • Lack of access totransport servicesreduces opportunitiesfor independence andautonomy and creates asense of obligation anddependency“I like to go to the day care centre and goout shopping – but sometimes I feelrushed, when my son takes me to town, assoon as we get there he says, “How longwill you be?”
  • Transportation initiatives emerge from, and weave together, a hugevariety of community services and resources.“Clients can see a physiotherapist, gettheir hair done, see a chiropodist…We do 2-3 showers a day – people need that support because otherwise theywouldn’t be able to still live at home.”
  • Mobile lives are sociable lives –mobility is valuedfor all it enables, not just the journey“It’s nice to have someone to talkto - put on the radio? The radioisn’t somebody to say hello to you.I like somebody who’s able to sayhello to me and chat to me…No-one to talk to, day in, day out. Onlyfor the likes of these clubs I’d havegone cuckoo.”
  • Transportation is a platform that links people to places, people andresources. It is both social engine and glue “People need to get out and socialise with people, get fresh air - it keeps people alert - to do their own shopping, do their own business.”
  • Community transport projects provide an essential service to a population who have few opportunities forsocial interaction or for access to healthcare and services.
  • From understanding to ideas
  • Who are we designing for? Drivers Bus Care Businesses Services Providers Older People Men & GroupsFamilies Women and The Clubs Internet
  • An Intention and Transportation Engine Aggregation ofTransport Providers people who want to who want travel passengers $£€ Service, Event, Business, Location who want customers, users, clients
  • Some Concluding Thoughts
  • Failing early isgood...but it’s still failure
  • The importance ofpartnerships, sharing and relinquishing
  • A Distributed Approach
  • Thank you sr@ideasbazaar.comwww.ideasbazaar.com @si_roberts