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Seserv workshop   costas courcoubetis - introduction to tussle analysis methodology
 

Seserv workshop costas courcoubetis - introduction to tussle analysis methodology

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Introduction to tussle analysis methodology

Introduction to tussle analysis methodology

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Seserv workshop   costas courcoubetis - introduction to tussle analysis methodology Seserv workshop costas courcoubetis - introduction to tussle analysis methodology Presentation Transcript

  • SESERV Socio-Economic Services for European Research Projects http://www.seserv.org European Seventh Framework CSA FP7-2010-ICT-258138Introduction to tussle analysis methodologyCostas Courcoubetis (AUEB)The interplay of economics andtechnology for the Future InternetSESERV WorkshopAthens, Greece, January 31, 2012© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 1
  • The Internet as a Platform for Stakeholders’ Interactions … Stakeholders with varying End-users ISPs Regulators ASPs socio-economic interests Out-of-network socio- economic interactions Technology choicesInternet Socio- (including investments, configurations)Economic layerInternet Technology outputsTechnology layer (connectivity, QoS, mobility, security, etc.) Internet middle applications boxes Firewalls Technology Internet protocols components links routers switches servers 3G towers Socio-Economic layer is governed by laws of socio-economics, while technology layer by laws of physics 2 © 2012 The SESERV Consortium
  • Basic Socio-economic Technology Cycle Internet Socio- Adopt technology Economic layer Longer ISP Dimension resources Feedback Adaptation timescaleStakeholders’ strategies Configure technology/ policies with respect toa specific technology(functionality) Use technology Shorter tussle outcome At each stage conflicts of interest (incentives) arise at the socio- economic layer. The combination of actors’ strategies lead to a tussle outcome, characterized by stakeholders benefits. © 2012 The SESERV Consortium 3
  • Tussle Evolution (1) • If the tussle outcome is considered “unfair” by certain stakeholders, they can react, and: • leave the system • adopt another technology or reconfigure that used • ask the regulator to intervene • … thus making the outcome unstable© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 4
  • Tussle Evolution (2) • Even a “fair” tussle outcome can destabilize other functionalities  spillover effect • Case study: Bandwidth sharing: • ISPs throttle bandwidth of p2p applications by using DPI • p2p applications perform traffic obfuscation • ISPs apply DPI techniques to affect quality of rival VoIP services • Analyzing the anticipated tussles can predict unstable periods • and help the long-term success of a technology© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 5
  • A tussle analysis methodology Functionality I Functionality II Step 1: Identify all primary stakeholder roles and their characteristics for the functionality under investigation new iteration spillover Step 2: Identify tussles among identified stakeholders tussle tussle tussle tussle Step 3: For each tussle assess the impact to each stakeholder and potential spillovers© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 6
  • Towards achieving stable outcomes • The “Design for choice” principle provides guidance in designing protocols that allow for variation in outcome. Useful properties are: • “Exposure of list of choices” suggesting that the stakeholders involved must be given the opportunity to express multiple alternative choices and which the other party should also consider. • “Exchange of valuation” suggesting that the stakeholders involved should communicate their preferences in regard to the available set of choices (for instance by ranking them in descending order). • “Exposure of choice’s impact” suggesting that the stakeholders involved should appreciate what the effects of their choices are on others • “Visibility of choices made” suggesting that both the agent and the principal of an action must allow the inference of which of the available choices has been selected. Clark, D. D., Wroclawski, J., Sollins, K. R., and Braden, R.: Tussle in Cyberspace: Defining Tomorrow’s Internet. IEEE/ ACM Trans. Networking 13, 3, pp. 462-475, June 2005© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 7
  • Towards avoiding tussle spillovers to other functionalities • The “Modularize the design along tussle boundaries” principle helps in identifying whether tussle spillovers can appear. • A protocol designer can check the following two conditions: • “Stakeholder separation”, or whether the choices of one stakeholder group have significant side effects on stakeholders of another functionality (another tussle space), for example creates economic externalities between stakeholders of different tussle spaces. • “Functional separation”, or whether different stakeholders use some functionality of the given technology in an unforeseen way to achieve a different goal in some other tussle space, i.e., the functionality of technology A interferes (and possibly cancels) with functionality of technology B. Clark, D. D., Wroclawski, J., Sollins, K. R., and Braden, R.: Tussle in Cyberspace: Defining Tomorrow’s Internet. IEEE/ ACM Trans. Networking 13, 3, pp. 462-475, June 2005© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 8
  • More Information • http://www.seserv.org • getinvolved@seserv.org • http://www.linkedin.com/groups?about=&gid=3870856 • http://www.twitter.com/seserv© 2012 The SESERV Consortium 9