Teacher Education as a Vehicle for Social Justice   and Transformation: Lessons Learned from Contemporary Theorists and Cu...
To institutionalize teacherpreparation as a vehicle for     social justice and      transformation,  we have to expose our...
Sources of Relevant Ideas **Contemporary Theorists/Ideas **My Current Research Work in Collaboration   with other Colleagu...
2005   1st and 4th Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for &           Social Justice2008            James Banks:  ...
2006   2nd. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social            Justice          Catherine Marshall: Leadersh...
2007   3rd. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social           Justice          Luis Moll: Funds of knowledge...
5th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice2009          Jean Anyon: Social class, Urban education,...
2010   6th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social           Justice       Donaldo Macedo: Critical pedagog...
2011   7th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice       Gloria Ladson-Billings:Critical Race Theor...
2012   8th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice       David Berliner: Out-of-school factors     ...
Teacher Disposition Research(Lalas & Bustos, 2012)•   Behaviors, characteristics, and perceptions teachers possess and    ...
Teacher Disposition: KeyFindings• Teaching reading was mainly the school’s  responsibility• Responses revealed “bottom-up”...
Teacher Disposition: KeyFindings• Limited access of teachers and the overall  community to different types of books and li...
Teacher Disposition: Lessons Learned• Teachers who are unable to think beyond the  “bottom up” and fail to consider vocabu...
Teacher Disposition: Lessons Learned• A teacher with an excellent disposition in  teaching reading ---   involves all stu...
Funds of Knowledge• Funds of knowledge – practices that are  embedded in the labor, domestic, family, and  community affai...
Funds of Knowledge as it relates topoverty…• The notion of funds of knowledge is a recognition  and affirmation of home an...
Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
Lessons Learned• Students are given very adult-like roles in the home,  take on a mentor role with siblings and relatives,...
Race: Outcast Phenomenon(Clay & Lalas, 2012)
Race: Key FindingsTolerated :• “I did not feel as isolated as I did in my original program,  but there still was not a fee...
Race: Key FindingsIsolated• “I felt isolated and lonely most of the time…”• “Not only did I feel ostracized by the other W...
Race: Key FindingsOvercoming stereotypes• “I didnt want to leave them [white classmates] with a bad  experience and cause ...
Race: Lessons LearnedDiversity is a challenging issue because some groups are eitherculturally or structurally empowered o...
Any questions• Maraming Salamat Po!Send me an email at:jose_lalas@redlands.eduDr. Jose LalasUniversity of RedlandsSchool o...
Teacher education as a vehicle for social justice and transformation by dr lalas
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Teacher education as a vehicle for social justice and transformation by dr lalas

  1. 1. Teacher Education as a Vehicle for Social Justice and Transformation: Lessons Learned from Contemporary Theorists and Current Researchon Teacher Disposition, Funds of Knowledge, and Race Jose Lalas, Ph.D. Professor of Literacy and Teacher Education Director, Center for Educational Justice
  2. 2. To institutionalize teacherpreparation as a vehicle for social justice and transformation, we have to expose our teachers to relevant, appropriate, critical, and provocative ideas!
  3. 3. Sources of Relevant Ideas **Contemporary Theorists/Ideas **My Current Research Work in Collaboration with other Colleagues: -teacher disposition -funds of knowledge -race
  4. 4. 2005 1st and 4th Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for & Social Justice2008 James Banks: Multicultural Education “We can get a full view of our own backgrounds and behaviors only by viewing them from the perspectives of other racial and ethnic cultures” “the essence of culture is not its artifacts, tools, or other tangible cultural elements but how the members of the group interpret, use, and perceive them. It is the values, symbols, interpretations, and perspectives that distinguish one people from another in modernized societies.” Dr. Banks extends his ideas of multicultural teaching which involves equity pedagogy and prejudice reduction into citizenship education within a global context.
  5. 5. 2006 2nd. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice Catherine Marshall: Leadership for Social Justice “We must engage with new terminology and concepts such as border culture, heterosexism, wholistc visioning, bridge people, cultural capital, equity audits, hybridity, ... and others that go beyond the dominant view of school leadership.” Dr. Marshall seeks to build capacity and collaboraton among scholars, practtoners, policymakers, and students to infuence the existng powerful school structures to incorporate social justce ideas, incentves, and mandates.
  6. 6. 2007 3rd. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice Luis Moll: Funds of knowledge The students’ multiple identities, social backgrounds, and lived experiences are dynamic sources of “funds of knowledge.” A variety of community and household experiences as well as networks of friends, relatives, and community contacts for any economic assistance and social participation shape the strengths students bring into classrooms. Dr. Moll encourages researchers and teachers to build from the “funds of knowledge” students already have by openly acknowledging diversity in language, culture, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and class backgrounds as valuable points of reference.
  7. 7. 5th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice2009 Jean Anyon: Social class, Urban education, neighborhood poverty, critical social explanation “As education policymakers and practitioners, we can act on the power of urban poverty, low-wage work, and housing segregation to dwarf most curricular, pedagogical, and other educational reforms.” Aside from her work on social class and hidden curriculum in the classroom, Dr. Anyon argues that we need not only better schools but also the reform of public policies concerning job, wage, housing, tax, and transportation.
  8. 8. 2010 6th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice Donaldo Macedo: Critical pedagogy; co-author with Freire “Our colonial literacy model is designed to domesticate so as to enable the “manufacture of consent.” Dr. Macedo challenges educators to examine “potentially dangerous educational practices” and engage in critical literacy to avoid “literacy for stupidification.” He co-authored the book “Reading the Word, Reading the World.”
  9. 9. 2011 7th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice Gloria Ladson-Billings:Critical Race Theory “My decision to deploy a critical race theoretical framework in my scholarship is intimately linked to my understanding of the potential and personal stake I have in the education of Black children…” “… culturally relevant teaching uses student culture in order to maintain it and to transcend the negative effects of the dominant culture.”
  10. 10. 2012 8th. Annual Institute on Educational Leadership for Social Justice David Berliner: Out-of-school factors “Although the power of schools and educators to infuence individual students is never to be underestmated, the out-of- school factors associated with poverty play both a powerful and a limitng role in what can actually be achieved.” Dr. Berliner asserts that “among the lowest social classes environmental factors, partcularly family and neighborhood infuences, not genetcs, is strongly associated with academic performance.”
  11. 11. Teacher Disposition Research(Lalas & Bustos, 2012)• Behaviors, characteristics, and perceptions teachers possess and demonstrate as they work with students• Fairly resistant to change and is consistent with the social realities under which it was produced• Influences the characteristics, observed behaviors and practices of an individual in dealing with the realities around them• Generates values, beliefs, traits, and perceptions that correspond to his or her socialization, training, and community practices
  12. 12. Teacher Disposition: KeyFindings• Teaching reading was mainly the school’s responsibility• Responses revealed “bottom-up” procedures that facilitate reading through the acquisition of a series of hierarchical skills• Being energetic, motivated, patience, encouraging, cooperative, and hardworking, resourcefulness, loving, and respectful were associated with effective teaching reading and writing.
  13. 13. Teacher Disposition: KeyFindings• Limited access of teachers and the overall community to different types of books and literacy- related materials• Teacher orientation in teaching reading was more affective than cognitive or skill-based• Writing was synonymous to penmanship
  14. 14. Teacher Disposition: Lessons Learned• Teachers who are unable to think beyond the “bottom up” and fail to consider vocabulary development, comprehension, literature response, and other meaning-based strategies, might have made the lack of success in achieving advanced proficiency in reading a predictable outcome.
  15. 15. Teacher Disposition: Lessons Learned• A teacher with an excellent disposition in teaching reading ---  involves all students in worthy meaningful and purposeful activities  Promotes the recognition of the value of each individual  creates a learning environment that is democratic, just, equitable, and caring.
  16. 16. Funds of Knowledge• Funds of knowledge – practices that are embedded in the labor, domestic, family, and community affairs of Mexican American families• Students’ multiple identities, social backgrounds, and lived experiences are dynamic sources of “funds of knowledge.”
  17. 17. Funds of Knowledge as it relates topoverty…• The notion of funds of knowledge is a recognition and affirmation of home and community practices including survival practices.• It builds positive social identities for students and informs teachers about the harmful ways in which the school curriculum may exclude some and privilege others.
  18. 18. Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
  19. 19. Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
  20. 20. Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
  21. 21. Funds of Knowledge: KeyFindings
  22. 22. Lessons Learned• Students are given very adult-like roles in the home, take on a mentor role with siblings and relatives, develop networking skills for support, and work in a team-like setting to solve problems and pass on family values.• This “funds of knowledge”—may go unused if students are expected to remain passive, quiet, and have little influence on the decisions made in class.
  23. 23. Race: Outcast Phenomenon(Clay & Lalas, 2012)
  24. 24. Race: Key FindingsTolerated :• “I did not feel as isolated as I did in my original program, but there still was not a feeling of being welcomed, it was more of a feeling of being tolerated.”Proving themselves• “The professor told me he was not sure that I would be able to do well in the program... Of course I had to prove him wrong.”
  25. 25. Race: Key FindingsIsolated• “I felt isolated and lonely most of the time…”• “Not only did I feel ostracized by the other White Americans, but the international students (mostly Chinese) were not very friendly to me either.”Invisible• I guess that just comes with the territory of being a Black student on a predominantly white university campus.”
  26. 26. Race: Key FindingsOvercoming stereotypes• “I didnt want to leave them [white classmates] with a bad experience and cause them to think that all blacks are overbearing loudmouths.”• “I wanted to avoid the misconceptions of being in the "all black" group… and purposely joined the group of students sitting closest to me.” Feeling judged• “Instead of being welcomed by the professor, I was interrogated about what I was doing there, if I met the criteria for enrolling…”
  27. 27. Race: Lessons LearnedDiversity is a challenging issue because some groups are eitherculturally or structurally empowered or disadvantaged due to their: Race Ethnicity Religion Language Handicapping conditions Gender Sexual orientation Social class Citizenship status
  28. 28. Any questions• Maraming Salamat Po!Send me an email at:jose_lalas@redlands.eduDr. Jose LalasUniversity of RedlandsSchool of Education  Professor of Literacy and Teacher Education  Director, Center for Educational Justice

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