iCrossing UK Client Summit 2011 - The Digital Landscape
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iCrossing UK Client Summit 2011 - The Digital Landscape

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iCrossing presesntation from the 2011 client summit on the digital landscape including digital strategy, search, content, mobile and multichannel

iCrossing presesntation from the 2011 client summit on the digital landscape including digital strategy, search, content, mobile and multichannel

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  • As we all know, as has been said many times over, we are In the midst of a digital revolution. Digital technologies are fundamentally disrupting and transforming all elements of our daily lives - how we communicate and collaborate, how we consume content and media, and how we conduct our businessIn our working lives at least, we are all coming at this reality as marketers - but this is clearly not just a marketing issue but a fundamental business issue - although we can say that marketing often finds itself at the forefront of this fundamental change because it deals with customers behaviour and their use of online technologies and platforms.As a consequence, businesses and organisations are having to adapt to accommodate this new way of communicating, collaborating and doing business; and we are all somewhere along this path to integrating the digital mindset into our organisational structures and working practices
  • From an agency perspective - we have seen organisations testing the water with social media for 4 or 5 years now; and a key outcome of this 'exploratory phase' is the realisation that some fundamental organisational and operational changes are needed to deal with this digital economy and marketplaceThis has meant that iCrossing (and other digital agencies) are increasingly being asked to help with and develop digital strategies. And given that digital strategy is so intertwined with business strategy, in some cases we are also being asked to consult on organisational change too.
  • If the point does need any illustration, this comparison between the relative fortunes of Blockbuster and Netflix in the US is as powerful as any I have seenWith the lack of any coherent digital strategy, in less than 10 years, Blockbuster saw their Market Cap fall from 1.62 Billion to 35 Million; whilst Netflix has grown from 288 Million to 9.18 Billion, with online subscribers rising from 857K to 20 Million. I read only yesterday in Techcrunch that Netflix are now the largest single source of Internet traffic in North America
  • It is important to remind ourselves that agencies are also affected by this fundamental change; but we believe that as a digital agency that we are well placed to deal with this change and make sense of it
  • Interesing opinion piece in Brand Republic recently (last week) in which Tim Hipperson of G2 outlined his thoughts about the Future Structure of Agencies:He called for an agency that can 'efficiently interpret data in order to gain a deeper understanding of consumer communities; and to be able to respond in real time to those communities. This means for many agencies there is a need to be more flexible - to make the shift from developing choreographed creative executions to understanding and nurturing customer communities; from delivering push communications to creating pull communications; from managing campaigns to facilitating conversations.The majority of people here today will know that this is not only a vision that we agree with, but one that we have pioneered, and one that has underpinned our growth as an agency over last 4 or 5 years.
  • We approach all of our work in this way, by listening to customers, creating and amplifying content and programmes, engaging with the audience and measuring and evaluating the effect.We therefore feel extremely confident that we are well placed to not only ensure that we continue to be relevant as an agency; but also to ensure that the strategies and programmes that we are developing with our clients are both relevant and effective.And that is why we are here, because just like you, we need to listen to and engage with our customers in order to keep ourselves relevant in this turbulent industry we love, or at least work in.
  • And so It is the growing importance of digital strategy and the associated organisational change, that forms one our key themes for these few days together - Jon Munro and I will be discussing this in more detail in a Visit Wales case study in the next session. And later on today Antony Mayfield will talk about the shift from Social Media to Social Business;, and tomorrow our CSO Adam Lavelle will be chairing a digital strategy panel.
  • iCrossing established its content and social media team around 5 years ago now, recognising that brands would increasingly need to put content at the forefront of their digital strategiesAntony is next up and will briefly introduce the Content Strategy theme; and just before lunch will host a Content Strategy panel along with Jon Munro from VW, and Tamsin Hemingray and Charlie Peveritt who lead our Content team at iCrossingIllustration reference – Brands as Publishers, US white paper on Content Strategy
  • Brands, media and audiences used to have distinct roles in the marketing relationship. Media owners used to serve as the meeting place for brans and consumers.Today those roles overlap, creating new opportunities and expectations.
  • Google has made an unprecedented number of updates to its algorithm over the last 2 years to take into account these changes in both brand and user behaviour; and to try to stay one step ahead of increasing competition in the marketplace.Doug Platts, our Head of Natural Search is going to give us a quick overview of these changes, and why we need to think about search differently these days - going beyond technical optimisation and link building to increasingly take account of the customer experience, social media and the quality of our content
  • And as we all know digital is not just about a desktop experience;
  • The number of users accessing the web via mobile devices is projected to overtake those accessing the web via desktop computers in around 2 years time; and already we are seeing significant percentages of people visiting our web properties on mobile devices. If anyone is planning to develop a new web site or platform in the next 2 years who don't have a solid mobile strategy in place, it is probably time to think again.
  • And last but not least, Multichannel - we have seen significant growth in the retail sector as an agency, and we are fortunate to have a large number of our retail clients with us over the next couple of days. We have had a number of dinner debates and round table discussions about multichannel recently - some of you will have attended those.Our CEO Paul Doleman is going to introduce our mobile and multichannel themes; and will host a multichannel panel tomorrow morning with Alex Vaidya from Porsche, Simon Harrow from Kiddicare, and our own Tom Jones - Head of Media at iCrossing.
  • The founding principles of search engine visibility (its core component parts) are the same today as they were in 1996.We are still dealing with the same core components but the shape of them has changed.
  • How have user signals, personalisation and social signals become as significant as the original principlesSearch engine strategies need to shift accordingly.Demonstrates the increasing importance of a connected strategy for sustainable visibility
  • Changing fundamental aspects of our search experience: a better understanding of who we are and what we’re trying to accomplish and a web that is much more dynamic and timely.Together, these two things demand that search becomes more temporally relevant, in addition to just being semantically relevant.Search is moving from being “stateless” to being very much in the here and now.For example, conversations in social media happen very much in real time. As we begin to apply what’s happening in the social graph as an additional ranking criterion to the information indexed in a search engine, interesting things begin to happen.Of course such usefulness depends on the ability to know who we are, what we’re doing and what we hope to accomplishThe EU have recently ruled on the use of cookies and new regulations which will mean that companies will need a user's permission to store a cookie on their devicesAudit the use of all cookies on your website Assess and rank the privacy implications of these Decide on an appropriate solution with which to gain user consent
  • A blend of rich content (images, video), news results, personal recommendation from your social graph.
  • Established search practices place emphasis on site architecture, on-page factors and placed links.
  • We are already seeing a shift in emphasis of the elements that contribute to successful natural search.On-page factors are still important, as is site architecture. But we need to prepare ourselves for a near-future where new signals - from social media, users and online PR - make a growing contribution to search engine visibility.
  • Demonstrates the increasing importance of a connected strategy for sustainable visibility
  • ) Mobile/Social/Local Combinations will Explode but will Generate Little Revenue As we also recently noted, everyone is getting into mobile/social/local services these days from Facebook to Google and Amazon to Groupon. But Forrester says that while the number and usage of these services will increase, it does not expect the services to generate meaningful revenue in 2011. Also, in a side note, there's bad news for Foursquare buried in the report. Although Forrester doesn't name names, it says that "location-based social networks" will struggle as standalone activities as major players like Facebook integrate location into their services, like Facebook has done with Facebook Places.2) 2011 is the Year of the "Dumb" Smartphone UserSmartphones will become more affordable, thanks to handset subsidies. And these new users will be less engaged and active than smartphone early adopters. Forrester expects they'll download fewer apps on average, but will consume more mobile media thanks to consumer education and convenience provided by the phones.Despite the fact that these former "dumb phone" users may download fewer apps than early adopters, the overall app forecast is still good. In fact, Gartner also just released a report that stated mobile app store revenue will pass $15 billion in 2011. It said:Worldwide mobile application store downloads are forecast to reach 17.7 billion downloads in 2011, a 117 percent increase from an estimated 8.2 billion downloads in 2010...By the end of 2014, Gartner forecast over 185 billion applications will have been downloaded from mobile app stores, since the launch of the first one in July 2008.Worldwide mobile application store revenue is projected to surpass $15.1 billion in 2011, both from end users buying applications and applications themselves generating advertising revenue for their developers. This is a 190 percent increase from 2010 revenue of $5.2 billion.(Note: The "dumb" reference in Forrester's trend title is not meant to a slight at the intelligence of these new users, by the way, but the phones they've upgraded from: feature phones, also sometimes called "dumb phones.")3) The Mobile Fragmentation Problem will ContinueForrester says it expects fragmentation to continue, but it's not just referring to the multiple variations of a single OS. It means that some customers have smartphones, some have feature phones, some use apps, some use SMS, plus there are multiple OS's in existence, in multiple versions, with multiple screen sizes and there are a higher number of devices out there. In short: fragmentation. The costs of porting, maintaining and promoting apps will remain high.4) The "Apps vs. Internet" Debate Will Continue...to be IrrelevantSays Forrester, it's not a question of "either/or" when it comes to a choice between apps vs. the mobile Web, but both. Frequent and intense users of services like banking and brokerage will want curated experiences in the form of apps, but the Internet will remain the fallback for more occasional information and needs. Mobile developers frustrated with the costs of building mobile apps for multiple platforms should rely more on the Web. Even if HTML5 doesn't scale within the next 2 to 3 years, mobile browsing experiences are improving, the report notes. But for targeting the "SuperConnecteds" and "Entertainers" (referring to two types of mobile users the firm classified previously, referring to, respectively, heavy users and those who listen to music, watch video and play games), apps are still needed.5) Mobile Marketing Spend will Surpass $1 BillionMarketer will begin allocating dedicated resources to mobile in 2011. In the U.S., Forrester forecasts that marketing spend on mobile display ads and search will surpass $1 billion in 2011. Marketers will find quantifiable ROI on mobile for generating real leads, driving foot traffic, and selling products and services.6) Mobile Will Increasingly Prompt Users to Interact with Their EnvironmentIn 2011, NFC will begin to matter. The market will move away from the trial stage in regions where there is NFC infrastructure in place, but barriers will still need to be removed for the technology to really take off. These include consumer demand, education and business model issues. Other technologies like QR codes (a type of barcode) and augmented reality will prompt users to hold up their phones to interact with the world around them. These initiatives, however, will remain nice, but will help raise awareness of the new forms of interaction provided by mobile.7) The Attention to 4G will Vastly Outweigh the Impact of 4G NetworksMore operators will launch 4G networks in 2011 to a lot of buzz, but Forrester says to ignore the hype. "4G will have as little impact as 3G had when it launched in Europe and the U.S. in 203." It took nearly 7 years for half of mobile subscribers in those regions to have 3G capable phones, says the firm. Expect similar trends for 4G.8) Companies will Invest First in Convenient Services for ConsumersForrester says that mobile product and service professionals, particularly in the travel industry, will invest first to keep their most lucrative customers happy. And in the hierarchy of benefits that mobile offers - revenue generation, cost savings and convenience - convenience will reign during 2011.9) Casual Gaming Will Continue to BoomSmartphones have become powerful gaming devices for the mass market, and this trend will continue in 2011. In the premium mobile space, new business models based on subscriptions, microtransactions and in-app billing will expand from the games category into others, like music and news.10) "Mobile" Will Mean More than Mobile PhonesConsumer adoption of tablets, eReaders, portable media devices and other mobile products has grown in 2010 and this will continue in 2011. Apps and services will need to work across devices and consumers will want ubiquitous access to content and services.  This will force service providers to sync content via the cloud to maintain a consistent experience across platforms.
  • ) Mobile/Social/Local Combinations will Explode but will Generate Little Revenue As we also recently noted, everyone is getting into mobile/social/local services these days from Facebook to Google and Amazon to Groupon. But Forrester says that while the number and usage of these services will increase, it does not expect the services to generate meaningful revenue in 2011. Also, in a side note, there's bad news for Foursquare buried in the report. Although Forrester doesn't name names, it says that "location-based social networks" will struggle as standalone activities as major players like Facebook integrate location into their services, like Facebook has done with Facebook Places.2) 2011 is the Year of the "Dumb" Smartphone UserSmartphones will become more affordable, thanks to handset subsidies. And these new users will be less engaged and active than smartphone early adopters. Forrester expects they'll download fewer apps on average, but will consume more mobile media thanks to consumer education and convenience provided by the phones.Despite the fact that these former "dumb phone" users may download fewer apps than early adopters, the overall app forecast is still good. In fact, Gartner also just released a report that stated mobile app store revenue will pass $15 billion in 2011. It said:Worldwide mobile application store downloads are forecast to reach 17.7 billion downloads in 2011, a 117 percent increase from an estimated 8.2 billion downloads in 2010...By the end of 2014, Gartner forecast over 185 billion applications will have been downloaded from mobile app stores, since the launch of the first one in July 2008.Worldwide mobile application store revenue is projected to surpass $15.1 billion in 2011, both from end users buying applications and applications themselves generating advertising revenue for their developers. This is a 190 percent increase from 2010 revenue of $5.2 billion.(Note: The "dumb" reference in Forrester's trend title is not meant to a slight at the intelligence of these new users, by the way, but the phones they've upgraded from: feature phones, also sometimes called "dumb phones.")3) The Mobile Fragmentation Problem will ContinueForrester says it expects fragmentation to continue, but it's not just referring to the multiple variations of a single OS. It means that some customers have smartphones, some have feature phones, some use apps, some use SMS, plus there are multiple OS's in existence, in multiple versions, with multiple screen sizes and there are a higher number of devices out there. In short: fragmentation. The costs of porting, maintaining and promoting apps will remain high.4) The "Apps vs. Internet" Debate Will Continue...to be IrrelevantSays Forrester, it's not a question of "either/or" when it comes to a choice between apps vs. the mobile Web, but both. Frequent and intense users of services like banking and brokerage will want curated experiences in the form of apps, but the Internet will remain the fallback for more occasional information and needs. Mobile developers frustrated with the costs of building mobile apps for multiple platforms should rely more on the Web. Even if HTML5 doesn't scale within the next 2 to 3 years, mobile browsing experiences are improving, the report notes. But for targeting the "SuperConnecteds" and "Entertainers" (referring to two types of mobile users the firm classified previously, referring to, respectively, heavy users and those who listen to music, watch video and play games), apps are still needed.5) Mobile Marketing Spend will Surpass $1 BillionMarketer will begin allocating dedicated resources to mobile in 2011. In the U.S., Forrester forecasts that marketing spend on mobile display ads and search will surpass $1 billion in 2011. Marketers will find quantifiable ROI on mobile for generating real leads, driving foot traffic, and selling products and services.6) Mobile Will Increasingly Prompt Users to Interact with Their EnvironmentIn 2011, NFC will begin to matter. The market will move away from the trial stage in regions where there is NFC infrastructure in place, but barriers will still need to be removed for the technology to really take off. These include consumer demand, education and business model issues. Other technologies like QR codes (a type of barcode) and augmented reality will prompt users to hold up their phones to interact with the world around them. These initiatives, however, will remain nice, but will help raise awareness of the new forms of interaction provided by mobile.7) The Attention to 4G will Vastly Outweigh the Impact of 4G NetworksMore operators will launch 4G networks in 2011 to a lot of buzz, but Forrester says to ignore the hype. "4G will have as little impact as 3G had when it launched in Europe and the U.S. in 203." It took nearly 7 years for half of mobile subscribers in those regions to have 3G capable phones, says the firm. Expect similar trends for 4G.8) Companies will Invest First in Convenient Services for ConsumersForrester says that mobile product and service professionals, particularly in the travel industry, will invest first to keep their most lucrative customers happy. And in the hierarchy of benefits that mobile offers - revenue generation, cost savings and convenience - convenience will reign during 2011.9) Casual Gaming Will Continue to BoomSmartphones have become powerful gaming devices for the mass market, and this trend will continue in 2011. In the premium mobile space, new business models based on subscriptions, microtransactions and in-app billing will expand from the games category into others, like music and news.10) "Mobile" Will Mean More than Mobile PhonesConsumer adoption of tablets, eReaders, portable media devices and other mobile products has grown in 2010 and this will continue in 2011. Apps and services will need to work across devices and consumers will want ubiquitous access to content and services.  This will force service providers to sync content via the cloud to maintain a consistent experience across platforms.
  • We promised you magic next season, and we’ve started with your Membership card. It will do a lot more than get you into the stadium on match days.Using just your clever card and a phone or web cam, you will be able to watch videos and see 3D images of your favourite players. Even better, one lucky member will discover that their card carries a Willy Wonka style golden ticket. It could be you. Your clever card’s secret powers come courtesy of the big letter  (that’s an augmented reality marker), the mosaic grid (that’s a QR code) and an internal RFID chip. All sound a bit technical? Don’t worry, seeing is believing, and over the course of the season you'll discover a whole host of cool things to see and do.More information on how to use your clever card will be available in July when you receive your card
  • We promised you magic next season, and we’ve started with your Membership card. It will do a lot more than get you into the stadium on match days.Using just your clever card and a phone or web cam, you will be able to watch videos and see 3D images of your favourite players. Even better, one lucky member will discover that their card carries a Willy Wonka style golden ticket. It could be you. Your clever card’s secret powers come courtesy of the big letter  (that’s an augmented reality marker), the mosaic grid (that’s a QR code) and an internal RFID chip. All sound a bit technical? Don’t worry, seeing is believing, and over the course of the season you'll discover a whole host of cool things to see and do.More information on how to use your clever card will be available in July when you receive your card

iCrossing UK Client Summit 2011 - The Digital Landscape iCrossing UK Client Summit 2011 - The Digital Landscape Presentation Transcript

  • THE DIGITAL LANDSCAPE
    iCrossing
    1
  • DIGITAL STRATEGY AND ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE
    Jason Ryan
    2
  • Communication
    Collaboration
    Consumption
    Conduct
    DIGITAL DISRUPTION
  • Test + Learn
    Acceptance
    Challenge
    Change
    ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE
  • Digital disruption
  • Agencies need to adapt too!
    ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE
  • DIGITAL DISRUPTION
    ‘What is needed is an agency that can efficiently interpret data in order to gain a deeper understanding of consumers and communities. This will enable them to deliver targeted on-demand messages. If agencies are unable to respond to up to the minute conversations and sentiment then brands will quite simply fail to engage with customers.  Hence a new agency structure must be implemented that can pay attention, learn, connect, innovate and inspire’
  • Icrossing approach
  • Digital Strategy & Change
    Content Strategy
    The Evolution of Search
    Mobile
    Multichannel
    KEY THEMES #1
  • Digital Strategy & Change
    Content Strategy
    The Evolution of Search
    Mobile
    Multichannel
    KEY THEMES #2
  • OPPORTUNITY
    CHANGING MEDIA LANDSCAPE
  • approaches
    E-zines
  • approaches
    Editorially-led Brand Community sites
  • approaches
    Editorially-led Brand Community sites
  • approaches
    Content/media hubs
  • approaches
    COMPANY BLOGs
  • INSIGHT
    BRANDED APPS
  • Digital Strategy & Change
    Content Strategy
    The Evolution of Search
    Mobile
    Multichannel
    KEY THEMES #3
  • Digital Strategy & Change
    Content Strategy
    The Evolution of Search
    Mobile
    Multichannel
    KEY THEMES #4
  • mobile
  • Digital Strategy & Change
    Content Strategy
    The Evolution of Search
    Mobile
    Multichannel
    KEY THEMES #5
  • CONTENT STRATEGY
    Antony Mayfield
    22
  • 23
    The big space in the middle.
    23
  • 24
    Brands compete in attention markets.
    24
  • 25
    New philosophies are emerging.
    25
  • 26
    Where does content sit?
    26
  • 27
    Neglected content.
    27
  • 28
    Content at the centre.
    28
  • 29
    Can brands be publishers?
    29
  • 30
    How real is POEM?
    30
  • 31
    Follow the money to find the truth.
    31
  • 32
    Build. Buy.
    (Sprinkle content)
    32
  • 33
    Editorial.
    Mindset
    Processes
    33
  • 34
    Talent.
    34
  • 35
    Joe Tripodi
    CMO of The Coca-Cola Company
    http://goo.gl/8aSNi
    We can't match the volume of our
    consumers' creative output, but
    we can spark it with the right type
    of content.
    35
  • 36
    36
  • EVOLUTION OF SEARCH
    Doug Platts, Head of Natural Search
    37
  • THE ORIGINAL PRINCIPLES FOR SUCCESS
    38
    FUNDAMENTALS
    Can search engines access the site and pages
    Is there search term rich, optimised on-page content
    Is the site a reputable resource, based on references from other sites
  • evolution
    developing signals of Search
  • vince
    The Big brand update
    40
  • caffeine
    increased speed of google’s infrastructure
    41
  • May day
    It’s about quality links
    42
  • personalisation
    Integration of past site visits
    43
  • Social signals
    Personalisation: integration of the social graph
    44
  • panda
    User data based judgment of the quality of content
    45
  • +1 button
    User Votes on the quality of content
    46
  • THE OUTCOME
    What does good search look like?
    Universal Search – more than 10 web pages. A richer, more relevant experience of video, review and image content
    Google Instant – being visible through the user journey
    Google Preview – clear creative message. An extension of your listing/ad
    Meta Descriptions – your elevator pitch
    Google +1 – your social graph recommending sites
    47
  • Established blend
    THE typical shape of seo for brands
    48
    Factor strength
    High Low
  • The new approach
    search visibility as an outcome of a connected brand
    49
    Factor strength
    High Low
  • This week
    Bing / Facebook tie-in
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPYVqHZKF2g
  • MOBILE AND MULTICHANNEL
    Paul Doleman
    51
  • MOBILE & MULTICHANNEL
    WITH PAUL DOLEMAN
  • THE UNNECESSARILY ANIMATED
    CREATIVE INTRODUCTION
  • YOU
    CAN
    ONLY
  • CREATE
    WHAT YOU CAN
    IMAGINE
    IMAGINE
  • YOU CAN DREAM OF
    ANY
    THING
    WHERE
    TIME
    YOU
    OFFER
    WILL
    2020
    MOBILECOMMUNICATION
  • THE UBIQUITOUS UNVERIFIABLE
    STATISTISTICS
  • 12 billion downloads $14 billion revenue
    20 million UK smartphone users
    48 million mobile users have no electricity
    500,000 new android users pcm
    http://connect.icrossing.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Mobile-OS-Market-Share-2.jpg
  • FUTUROLOGY
  • Mobile/Social/Local Combinations
    "Dumb“ Smartphone Users
    Fragmentation, Apps vs. Internet
    $1 Billion
    Environment and Convenience
    4G and Casual Gaming
  • AR
    3D
    NFC
    TNG RFID
    LBS APPS
    Hyperlocal
  • VISION VIDEO
  • FLIGHT OFFANCY?
  • THE TENUOUS REFERENCE TO
    MANCHESTER CITY
  • THE BLINDINGLY OBVIOUS TAKE AWAY
  • Mobile is more than phones
    Mobile is multi-channel
    THE BLINDINGLY OBVIOUS TAKE AWAY
  • THANKS FOR LISTENING.