Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The 4 Forces of Customer Service
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

The 4 Forces of Customer Service

3,530
views

Published on

Learn 4 key forces that shape your organization's customer service experience. Learn how you can actively improve your organizations customer service experience.

Learn 4 key forces that shape your organization's customer service experience. Learn how you can actively improve your organizations customer service experience.

Published in: Business, Education

2 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Really good stuff, and simple to understend. Thanks a million.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Some great information here, thanks, @sstealey and @icontact
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,530
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
241
Comments
2
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • The key takeaway here is that the first three bullet points are usually part of your business plan; the fourth bullet point requires that you answer the first three and usually requires more thought outside of your business plan.
  • Adhering to the Golden Rule isn’t good enough…you need to strive for the Platinum Rule. You definitely don’t want to follow the Bronze Rule.
  • Abraham Maslow was a psychologist who in the 1950’s suggested everyone has a personal Hierarchy of Needs, as shown here.
  • Chip Conley, in his book PEAK, adapts Maslow’s hierarchy for Customer Service purposes.
  • During the live webinar, we found over 70% of people either have strong mechanisms in place or leave it up to their individual employees if they want to thank customers. We highly recommend enabling your employees to give tangible gifts, cards, social media mentions, or exclusive offers to customers.
  • To see this video, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=py1iRsBcYMc
  • To see this video, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqHWAE8GDEk
  • To see this video, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-r8Th9DBGbQ
  • To see this video, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrLE3Wr6oLs
  • We send surveys out to our customers after each interaction, and continually monitor our service levels. One way we check how well we handle customers is through our new Customer Satisfaction web page, which is publicly visible.We also like to launch contests and programs to engage our customers and let them know they are appreciated.
  • If you have any feedback for us regarding this presentation, please email support@icontact.com, to the attention of the Learning and Development team.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The 4 Forces of Customer Service
      Presented by iContact Support
      October 2011
    • 2. Purpose
      Learn 4 key forces that shape your organization’s customer service experience.
      Learn how you can actively improve your organization’s customer service experience.
    • 3. Agenda
      Meet Sarah Stealey
      The 4 forces of customer service
      How to handle difficult customers
      Examples of great customer service
      Q & A
    • 4. Sarah Stealey, Sr. VP of Customer Support
      • MBA, Global Business, Pepperdine University.
      • 5. 15 years of sales, operations and client management experience
      • 6. Currently responsible for:
      • 7. Technical Support
      • 8. Learning and Development
      • 9. Deliverability
      • 10. Customer Billing
      • 11. Customer Care
    • Sarah Stealey, Sr. VP of Customer Support
      • Recipient of the 2011 Triangle Business Journal “40 under 40” award
      • 12. 2011 Triangle LLS Woman of the Year
      • 13. If she could take two things with her on a desert island, they would be:
      • 14. Iona, her bossy Corgi
      • 15. A signed, limited editionStephen King novel.
    • Why Customer Service Matters
      More competitors offering similar products and services
      Customer loyalty tested at each interaction with the company
      A bad experience can erase a customer’s memory of all the good experiences
    • 16. Force 1:
      Perceptions of your Organization
      Your perception
      The customer’s perception
    • 17. Your Perception
      What is your business?
      Who is your customer?
      What does your customer value?
      How do I engage employees to provide what customers value?
      Adapted from the work of Dr. Peter F. Drucker,
      Father of Management Theory
    • 18. The Customer’s Perception
      Own and shape the perception; don’t let others decide for you!
    • 19. Force 2:
      Perceptions of the Organization
      Customer Expectations
    • 20. Main Customer Expectations
      Courtesy & Professionalism
      Understanding of the Problem
      Recognition of Impact
      Technical/Industry Knowledge
      Coordination of Resources
      Overall Quality
    • 21. Rules of Service
      Treat Others
      As You Have Been Treated.
    • 22. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
      Image file licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Author – User: Factoryjoe
      http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en
    • 23. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Customer Service
      Source: “Peak: How Great Companies Get their Mojo from Maslow,” by Chip Conley
    • 24. Force 3:
      Perceptions of the Organization
      Customer Expectations
      Company Values
    • 25. iContact’s Values
      Wow the customer
      Operate with urgency
      Work without mediocrity
      Make a positive wake
      Engage as an owner
    • 26. Force 4:
      Perceptions of the Organization
      Customer Expectations
      Company Values
      Experience Management
    • 27. Experience Management
      “A year from now, your
      customer may not
      remember what you said
      or what you did, but they
      will remember how you
      made them feel.”
      - Excerpt from The Successful Manager
    • 28. Poll Question
      Do you or your employees
      actively recognize your customers?
      No, I never thought of doing this
      Sometimes, but it’s up to individual employees if they want to thank customers
      Yes, we have strong mechanisms in place for employees to actively recognize customers
      #icontactsupport
    • 29. Managing the Difficult Customer
      “It’s not that the customer
      is always right,
      but that the customer
      has to be treated with
      respect and dignity.”
      Leslie Byrne, Former Director of the U.S. Office of Consumer Affairs
    • 30. D.E.F.U.S.E.
      Don’t lose your cool.
      Encourage customers to vent their emotions.
      Find out the facts.
      Understand your customer’s feelings.
      Suggest a way to fix the problem.
      End on a positive note.
    • 31. Example - Zappos
      They’re just a shoe/clothing warehouse, right?
      Slogan: Powered by Service
      Turn customers into advocates for a businessthey don’t own.
    • 32. Example – KLM Airlines
      Improve the weakest part of your customer’s experience
      Monitor social networks to learn more about your customers
    • 33. Example – Ramon DeLeon, Dominos
      Monitor social media so bad experiences are set right
      If you don’t reach out to customers, they may reach out to others and hurt your reputation.
      “The only way to put out a social media fireis with social media water.”
    • 34. Example – Pike Place Fish Market
      Asked employees for input on providing an amazing customer service experience
      Created an experience easily shared with others via photos and video
    • 35. How is iContact Doing?
      icontact.com/support/customer-satisfaction
      facebook.com/icontact
    • 36. Suggestions and Tools
      Social Media
      Monitor the social networks and shape the conversation
      Hootsuite or Tweetdeck
      iContact – post email messages to Facebook and Twitter
      iContact – add “Like” and “Tweet” buttons to messages
    • 37. Suggestions and Tools
      Customer and Employee Feedback
      iContact – surveys (private vs. public)
      Search internet for “customer satisfaction survey questions”
    • 38. Suggestions and Tools
      Personalization
      Pay attention to your customers’ interests
      iContact – create custom data fields and use segments
    • 39. Suggested Reading
      Peak by Chip Conley
      Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion and Purposeby Tony Hsieh
      Raving Fans: A Revolutionary Approach to Customer Serviceby Ken Blanchard
      The Happiness Hypothesis by Jonathan Haidt
    • 40. Thank You for Attending!