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Literature searching
 
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  • My name and role. Today is going to be an introduction to the Library at ICH and I’m also going to mention the other UCL Libraries, which you can use as well. I am also going to look at some of the online resources that you will have access to while you are at the ICH, because a lot of the information that you need for your course will be available online. We are going to spend the first part of this session (around 40 minutes) in the classroom and then I’m going to take you for a brief tour of the library here. You will find that you need to use the UCL libraries and you will need to use online information resources during your course: Online resources that UCL Libraries pay for and make available Free online resources If you have done a course in a UK university before, then you will probably be used to using libraries and online resources in your work. For others this may be a new approach to studying. When you are writing essays, you will need to add a list of what you have read on the subject at the end of the essay to show the marker how you have acquired an understanding of the subjects, for example, or you can use the writing of others to back up your own arguments. You will need to use
  • E.g. finding out about a topic that is new to you, or tracing how something has changed or developed over time. Or demonstrate to the person that is marking your essay that you have read background information about a subject. With facts and figures, or with the arguments of others. Make sure that you are referring to the most recent information that is available on your topic. And this may be useful to you once you have finished the course here…
  • The PICO tool then, is a way of formulating your problem into an answerable clinical question. This can help you with your search as well as helping you to define more properly what it is that you want to find out. You will normally start with a scenario and work from there. In this example we have actually started with a formulated question and will work backwards to show where the separate concepts have come from. So – the question then is ….. What is the population we are talking about?
  • The intervention?
  • Virazole is a brand name. Try to think of synonyms for the different concepts as they may have been used by the researchers – here we have grommets that can also be referred to as tympanostomy tubes
  • We then think of any comparators that there might be, including no treatment or a placebo where appropriate. Dexamethasone = a steroid Chloramphenical = an antibiotic
  • We then think of any comparators that there might be, including no treatment or a placebo where appropriate.
  • We then think of any comparators that there might be, including no treatment or a placebo where appropriate.
  • We’ll move on now to searching techniques. Use slides to talk from. Search for concepts individually and put them together – so in our example we are going to search for otitis media separately to grommets. We’ll then combine the two with AND to get our results. If they are available its also best to use subject headings – these are thesaurus terms that are used when adding papers to the various databases in order to help people find them more easily according to the subject they are about.

Literature searching Literature searching Presentation Transcript

  • Bibliographic Searching Grazia Manzotti Deputy Librarian g.manzotti@ucl.ac.uk Heather Chesters Assistant Librarian h.chesters@ucl.ac.uk
  • Why search?• To find more information on a topic• To ensure you are not missing essential information• To support an argument• To keep up-to-date Knowing which resources to go to and how to search them efficiently can help use your time more effectively
  • Framing the question - PICODoes administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis?
  • PopulationDoes administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis? children with meningococcal meningitis
  • InterventionDoes administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis? corticosteroids children with corticoids meningococcal meningitis
  • ComparisonDoes administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis? corticosteroids children with corticoids meningococcal meningitis no treatment pneumococcal conjugate vaccines
  • OutcomeDoes administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis? corticosteroids reduced children with neurological corticoids meningococcal impairment meningitis no treatment reduced incidence of pneumococcal hearing loss conjugate vaccines
  • Does administration of corticosteroids improve neurological outcome in children with meningococcal meningitis? corticosteroids reduced children with neurological corticoids impairment meningococcal meningitis reduced no treatment incidence of pneumococcal hearing loss conjugate vaccines
  • Basics of searching• Break your search into concepts – Synonyms, plurals, US / UK spelling• Use subject headings if possible – Also called descriptors, MeSH, Thesaurus terms• Think about any limits to your search
  • Combining SearchesSearches can be combined together using BOOLEAN operators: OR AND
  • AND and ORMeningococcal meningitis AND Corticosteroids Corticosteroids OR Corticoids
  • Construction of an efficient subject search strategyTo ensure that as many relevant results as possible are found, itis recommended that each concept is searched twice: once usingsubject headings and once using text words.