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ICGF Conference Miami, May 21, 2010 Nadereh Chamlou The World Bank
<ul><li>Emerging global talent crisis and its root causes </li></ul><ul><li>Solutions to talent crisis:  skills upgrading,...
<ul><li>Global economy will face demographic shock of a scale not yet observed </li></ul><ul><li>Despite the significant w...
<ul><li>Current high unemployment levels have not disguised talent shortages and employing the unemployed is not a solutio...
<ul><li>Crises pinpoint inefficiencies.  Yet, prescriptions discussed earlier  to deal with the global talent crisis are i...
<ul><li>Gender is Smart Economics (The World Bank, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>The Bottom Line:  Connecting Corporate Performa...
<ul><li>Companies with a higher percentage of women in top management experienced better financial performance than compan...
<ul><li>Based on CAC 40 listed companies, the more women in management, the lower the share price decline during 2008/2009...
<ul><li>Report on 6,000 companies in 16 major economies, employing between 1,000-30,000 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Women la...
<ul><li>Female labor force participation considerably below potential and below world average </li></ul>World average 0.00...
<ul><li>Still, women’s entrepreneurship is on the rise </li></ul><ul><li>Share/size of female-owned firms in developing re...
Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data
<ul><li>Export as much </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More so Egypt (30% women, 20% men), Jordan (50% women, 30% men),  and Morocco...
<ul><li>Investment climate is difficult for all </li></ul><ul><li>(but more so for women) </li></ul>
Source: World Bank Enterprise survey Data
<ul><li>WORLDWIDE, 24% of workers are women </li></ul><ul><li>Female-owned firms hire more women, IN GENERAL </li></ul><ul...
Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data World average % of women in professional and managerial positions (as % of total...
Source: World Bank Central Database and Edstats (September 2009)
<ul><li>Ultimately, Human Capital is the most indispensable driver of economic growth and THE foundation of innovation </l...
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Nadereh chamlou talent crisis and gender equality english

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Human Capital Concerns – Ensuring Gender Equality

Nadereh Chamlou, Senior Advisor, Middle East and North Africa, The World Bank

The importance of a focus on gender impact in all aspects of PFM will the topic of this session.

Published in: Business, Career, Technology
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  • FOFs do a better job worldwide also in hiring women in non-production work. Again MENA’s performance is among the lowest. Therefore, it is important not only to recognize the role of FoFs in creating opportunity for female employment in MENA (both as total workers and as non-production workers) but also to improve their role in order to boost female employment.
  • Therefore, it is important to focus on the role of MOF
  • Transcript of "Nadereh chamlou talent crisis and gender equality english"

    1. 1. ICGF Conference Miami, May 21, 2010 Nadereh Chamlou The World Bank
    2. 2. <ul><li>Emerging global talent crisis and its root causes </li></ul><ul><li>Solutions to talent crisis: skills upgrading, labor mobility, and off-shoring to labor abundant locations </li></ul><ul><li>“ Brain waste” due to widespread gender gap caused by traditions, conservative attitudes and social norms </li></ul><ul><li>Bridging gender gap is good business, not just for fairness </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: talent crisis cannot be met without narrowing of gender gap </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Global economy will face demographic shock of a scale not yet observed </li></ul><ul><li>Despite the significant workforce transformation – more educated, more mobile, and more diverse than ever before – we are at the dawn of an unparalleled skills crisis as the working-age population of many developed economies starts to decline. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2050, the global population of 60+ projected to exceed <15 cohort for first time in history; developed economies will not find enough employees in home markets to sustain profitability and growth. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge will be broad-based and affect all stakeholders and organizations. </li></ul><ul><li> Human capital shortage will surpass financial and natural resource constraints and will slow down the economic engine of the future </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Stimulating Economies through Fostering Talent Mobility (World Economic Forum ) </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Current high unemployment levels have not disguised talent shortages and employing the unemployed is not a solution </li></ul><ul><li>Need for effective collaboration among business, NGOs, government, and universities – issues broad-based and universal </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging consensus on solving the talent shortages: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Education, skills upgrading, and innovation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Talent mobility and new talent environment of “brain circulation” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Outsourcing/offshoring core knowledge functions to labor abundant markets </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Crises pinpoint inefficiencies. Yet, prescriptions discussed earlier to deal with the global talent crisis are insufficient </li></ul><ul><li>A critical shortcoming: BRAIN WASTE – defined as “women and minorities BEING underutilized in the work place” </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity and inclusion are part of the TALK, but not quite yet part of the WALK within organizations/businesses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity & Inclusion still perceived as “doing good” rather than as serious business needs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gender gap in economic opportunities remain despite impressive female gains in education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>is THE persistent “ brain waste ” that cuts across ethnic groups, nations, and cultures </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Gender is Smart Economics (The World Bank, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity (Catalyst, 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulating Economies through Fostering Talent Mobility (World Economic Forum, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>The Gender Corporate Gap report (World Economic Forum, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li> While causality between number of female managers and share price cannot be proven, studies suggest that better talent management, may also lead to better management of other assets/operations </li></ul>ICGF Conference
    7. 7. <ul><li>Companies with a higher percentage of women in top management experienced better financial performance than companies with lower women’s representation </li></ul><ul><li>This finding holds for Return on Equity (ROE), which is 35% higher, and for Total Return to Shareholders (TRS), 34% higher </li></ul><ul><li>In the 5 industries analyzed, companies with highest women’s representation in top management experienced higher ROE than companies with lowest women’s representation </li></ul><ul><li>In 4 out of 5 industries, companies with highest women’s representation in management experienced a higher TRS than companies with lowest women’s representation </li></ul><ul><li>Study replicated in Canada, Europe, and OECD countries with similar conclusions. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Based on CAC 40 listed companies, the more women in management, the lower the share price decline during 2008/2009 financial crisis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CAC 40 declined by 43%, while corporates with high gender diversity lost less </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hermes rose 17% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sodexho decreased 8% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Danone fell 30% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>In contrast, companies with mainly male management decreased more than CAC 40 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lucent fell by 70% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Renault fell by 81% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Arcelor Mittal fell by 67% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Similarly, in banking, BNP Paribas with higher management diversity fell 39% while Credit Agricole with less diversity fell by 62% </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Report on 6,000 companies in 16 major economies, employing between 1,000-30,000 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Women largely concentrated in entry or middle level positions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Except for Norway where board diversity is mandated by law, the higher the levels of responsibility the lower the percentage of women </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Closing the male/female employment gap is estimated to boost US GDP by 9%, Eurozone GDP by 13%, Japan GDP by 16%, suggesting: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>economies benefit by better integrating female talent pool </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>particularly positive correlation between gender diversity in leadership and company financial performance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>diverse backgrounds – rather than homogeneity – key to understanding markets and risks </li></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Female labor force participation considerably below potential and below world average </li></ul>World average 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 1.80 2.00 1980 2000 2005 Countries below the line underutilize investments in female capacity relative to actual FLFP -
    11. 11. <ul><li>Still, women’s entrepreneurship is on the rise </li></ul><ul><li>Share/size of female-owned firms in developing regions </li></ul>Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data
    12. 12. Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data
    13. 13. <ul><li>Export as much </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More so Egypt (30% women, 20% men), Jordan (50% women, 30% men), and Morocco (65% women, 50% men) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Attract as much Foreign Direct Investment </li></ul><ul><li>Use Websites and E-mail AS OFTEN </li></ul><ul><li>And, hire as educated and skilled workers as male firms, with one exception … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FEMALE-OWNED FIRMS hire more women (25% vs 22%), but more IN professional and manageMENT POSITIONS </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Investment climate is difficult for all </li></ul><ul><li>(but more so for women) </li></ul>
    15. 15. Source: World Bank Enterprise survey Data
    16. 16. <ul><li>WORLDWIDE, 24% of workers are women </li></ul><ul><li>Female-owned firms hire more women, IN GENERAL </li></ul><ul><li>MENA is lowest – but, THERE TOO, female-owned firms hire more women </li></ul>Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data World average
    17. 17. Source: World Bank Enterprise Survey Data World average % of women in professional and managerial positions (as % of total non production workers) 37 48 51 33 42 26 37 42 34 35 0 20 40 60 All countries East Asia & Pacific Latin America & Caribbean Middle East & North Africa Sub-Saharan Africa % Male-owned firms Female-owned firms
    18. 18.
    19. 19. Source: World Bank Central Database and Edstats (September 2009)
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    25. 25. <ul><li>Ultimately, Human Capital is the most indispensable driver of economic growth and THE foundation of innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Tapping into global talent pool – through migration, skills upgrading, off-shoring of core functions is necessary, but insufficient without due attention to gender diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Bridging the gender gap at all levels is critical for talent management and a stop to the brain waste </li></ul><ul><li>MENA has potential to become a future talent hub, particularly by absorbing the growing number of female university graduates </li></ul>
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