Day1 sp4 icgfm201405-gordon_ferrier_en

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Day1 sp4 icgfm201405-gordon_ferrier_en

  1. 1. Public Financial Management Competencies: Lessons from the Field Gordon Ferrier, Assistant Director (International) Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy
  2. 2. Introduction and background
  3. 3. What is Competency? “a cluster of related knowledge, skills and attitudes that affects a major part of one’s job (a role or responsibility), that correlates with performance on the job, that can be measured against well-accepted standards, and that can be improved via training and development” Referenced in Parry, S.R. The Quest for Competencies, Training, July 1996 pp 48-56 …and behaviours
  4. 4. Uses and Benefits of Competency Frameworks Performance appraisal. Base appraisal on objective criteria.
  5. 5. Uses and Benefits of Competency Frameworks Development: Specify needs in competency terms, not inputs.
  6. 6. Uses and Benefits of Competency Frameworks Job design: Create rewarding and satisfying jobs.
  7. 7. Uses and Benefits of Competency Frameworks Training: more systematic, linked to performance, target use of budgets
  8. 8. Components of Competency Knowledge: factual information accepted to be true. Skills: the learned ability to carry out predefined processes. Attitudes: a relatively enduring disposition to view people, places, things or events in a particular way. Behaviour: a specific action taken to achieve a (usually) predetermined outcome.
  9. 9. A Competency Statement
  10. 10. The Competency Model Current and future requirements Six Frameworks: One Common (all PFM staff) and Five Functional Key (critical) competencies only: no attempt to be comprehensive Four Common competencies Five – Eight competencies according to Function
  11. 11. Validating the Model FaceValidity • “Makes sense” ConstructValidity • Distinguishes levels of performance ContentValidity • Coverage of the domain
  12. 12. ContentValidity Learning and Growing Legislation Standards Strategy & Planning Assurance Scrutiny Operations Monitoring & Internal Control
  13. 13. Integrating with Existing Frameworks All civil servants PFM staff Senior civil servants
  14. 14. Competency and Performance Research evidence
  15. 15. Competency and Performance
  16. 16. Issues: 1 Defining PFM Capturing representative views Balancing country needs with expert opinion Handling volume Anticipating future needs
  17. 17. Issues: 2 Integrating with other frameworks and initiatives Clearly differentiating between knowledge, skills attitudes and behaviours Statements: Progressive or Cumulative? Supply side capacity Efficiency of current spending GOP • $228 • 3.2 UK • $178 • 2.5 Canada • $72 • 1
  18. 18. Progressive or Cumulative?
  19. 19. A1 A2 A3 S1 S2 K1 K2 K3 B1 B2 B3
  20. 20. A1 A2 A3 S1 S2 K1 K2 K3 B1 B2 B3 B4 S3 K4
  21. 21. A1 A2 A3 S1 S2 K1 K2 K3 B1 B2 B3 B4 S3 K4
  22. 22. Progressive or Cumulative? Conclusion:The Competency Frameworks are not cumulative or progressive by design… …although some statements may be cumulative or progressive in their effect.
  23. 23. Implementing the Model Key Conditions
  24. 24. Lessons Learned Design only a starting point Constant need for education Few right or wrong answers Context is critical Key stakeholders must be committed Long term commitment important There comes a time to let go!
  25. 25. Public Financial Management Competencies: Lessons from the Field Gordon Ferrier, Assistant Director (International) Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy end

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