Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The Effects Of The Use Of On-Line Services On Security & Privacy of Data   Mr. Powell
Need to protect confidentiality of data  <ul><li>Use of SSL for payments & transfers </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Quality seals’ on...
Data protection legislation <ul><li>UK Data Protection Act -  </li></ul><ul><li>Who can access this data? </li></ul><ul><l...
Social and ethical implications <ul><li>Duty of confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities for passing on information <...
Security Measures <ul><li>Bank sites require more than single password authentication:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of https...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

3e - The Effects Of The Use Of On Line Services On Security & Privacy

289

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
289
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Confidentiality is ensuring that information is accessible only to those of information security. Confidentiality is maintained in most on-line systems by the techniques of modern cryptography. User and payment data is encrypted by SSL when it is transferred on the Internet. Quality seals can be placed on the Shop webpage if it has undergone an independent assessment and meets all requirements of the company issuing the seal. The purpose of these seals is to increase the confidence of the online shoppers; the existence of many different seals foils this effort to a certain extent. The ability of the online merchant to determine the identity of the purchaser is still the major security issue. Repudiations (disownership) of involvement with online transactions can happen even 6 months after the date of transaction. Privacy of personal information is a big issue. In spite of Privacy Guidelines of the OECD , for example, privacy violations still occur and hamper eCommerce from developing to its full potential.
  • Data protection legislation Data protection acts exist in most countries. These set down rules for keeping data private as well as confidential. UK Data Protection Act. The development of new technology has meant that many organisations store and process personal details on computer.  This may be data on customers, employees, suppliers, competitors, etc.  This has worried many people whose main concerns are: Who will be able to access this data?   Will information about me be available over the Internet, and therefore vulnerable to hackers?  Can my records be sold on to someone else? Is the data accurate? If it is stored, processed and transmitted by computer, who will check that it is accurate? People often think it must be true if &apos;it says so on the computer&apos;. Will the data be sold on to another company? For example, could my health records be sold to a company where I have applied for a job? Could my personal details, collected by my employer, be used by a commercial company for targeting junk mail? Will data about me be stored even if it is not needed? If the original reason for having the data has passed, can the data still be kept? There was an earlier Data Protection Act in 1984 which set out to address some of these problems.  However, technology had moved on, and it was found that many things were no longer covered by this Act.  Therefore, in 1998, an updated version was passed.
  • Social and ethical implications of access to personal information Duty of confidence – Everyone working for or with an organization that records, handles, stores or otherwise comes across information has a personal common law duty of confidence to clients and to his or her employer. Responsibilities for passing on information – Organization are accountable for their decisions to pass on information. Only the minimum identifiable information should be used. Anonymised information – Where anonymised information would be sufficient for a particular purpose, identifiable information should be omitted wherever possible. Aggregated information – aggregating selective information about a small number of clients may not always safeguard confidence adequately. If confidence is breached – Organization are strongly advised to include a duty of confidence requirement in employment contracts. Clients who feel that confidence has been breached should be able to use complaints procedures against the organization. Give some example of how large organization such as the UK NHS deals with confidentiality.
  • E4-Need for security Security measures – under the Data Protection Act security measures must be in place with an organization to protect computerized information. Protection through single password authentication , as is the case in most secure Internet shopping sites, is not considered secure enough for personal online banking applications in some countries. Online banking user interfaces are secure sites (generally employing the https protocol) and traffic of all information - including the password - is encrypted, making it next to impossible for a third party to obtain or modify information after it is sent. However, encryption alone does not rule out the possibility of hackers gaining access to vulnerable home PCs and intercepting the password as it is typed in ( keystroke logging ). There is also the danger of password cracking and physical theft of passwords written down by careless users. Many online banking services therefore impose a second layer of security . Strategies vary, but a common method is the use of transaction numbers, or TANs , which are essentially single use passwords. Another strategy is the use of two passwords, only random parts of which are entered at the start of every online banking session. This is however slightly less secure than the TAN alternative and more inconvenient for the user. A third option, used in many European countries and currently being trialled in the UK is providing customers with security token devices capable of generating single use passwords unique to the customer&apos;s token (this is called two-factor authentication or 2FA). Another option is using digital certificates , which digitally sign or authenticate the transactions, by linking them to the physical device (e.g. computer, mobile phone , etc). Fraud Some customers avoid online banking as they perceive it as being too vulnerable to fraud. The security measures employed by most banks can never be completely safe, but in practice the number of fraud victims due to online banking is very small. This is probably due to the fact that a relatively small number of people use Internet banking compared with the total number of banking customers world wide. Indeed, conventional banking practices may be more prone to abuse by fraudsters than online banking[ Who says this? ]. Credit card fraud , signature forgery and identity theft are far more widespread &amp;quot;offline&amp;quot; crimes than malicious hacking . Bank transactions are generally traceable and criminal penalties for bank fraud are high. Online banking becomes less secure if users are careless, gullible or computer illiterate. An increasingly popular criminal practice to gain access to a user&apos;s finances is phishing , whereby the user is in some way persuaded to hand over their password(s) to a fraudster.
  • Transcript of "3e - The Effects Of The Use Of On Line Services On Security & Privacy"

    1. 1. The Effects Of The Use Of On-Line Services On Security & Privacy of Data Mr. Powell
    2. 2. Need to protect confidentiality of data <ul><li>Use of SSL for payments & transfers </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Quality seals’ on a website given by independent assessors </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of the ability of the merchant to recognise the customer </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of privacy of information </li></ul>
    3. 3. Data protection legislation <ul><li>UK Data Protection Act - </li></ul><ul><li>Who can access this data? </li></ul><ul><li>Accuracy of data </li></ul><ul><li>Selling of databanks </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance of data usage </li></ul>
    4. 4. Social and ethical implications <ul><li>Duty of confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities for passing on information </li></ul><ul><li>Anonymised information </li></ul><ul><li>Aggregated information </li></ul><ul><li>If confidence is breached </li></ul>
    5. 5. Security Measures <ul><li>Bank sites require more than single password authentication: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of https employing encryption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drop down lists & other methods to avoid screen grabbers & keystroke loggers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of TAN’s (effectively single use passwords) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security tolken producing single use passwords (called two-factor authentication or 2fa) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital certificates link transactions to a physical device </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Offline and Online fraud – which is bigger? </li></ul>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×