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Promotion of Cereal Banks and Access to Markets for Farmers in Ethiopia - Evaluation Presentation to the  ICCO – DREO team...
NGO’s or Enterpreneurs  <ul><li>Presentation will refer to ICCO’s dilemma to chose between its historical partners (NGO’s)...
Fast track : caracteristics <ul><li>Clear track – a business plan shows the financial sustainability within some years </l...
Slow track : caracteristicss <ul><li>Existing (social) partners are stimulated to facilitate economic activities for targe...
Cereal Bank ≠ Value Chains <ul><li>At that time Joost de la Rive Box also questioned the choice for cereals to develop val...
Program objectives <ul><li>Overall: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Secured cash income for farmers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impro...
Actors involved  <ul><li>Five different NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>A service provider FFARM </li></ul><ul><li>Permanent techn...
Program indicators <ul><li>Two years : 2006 – 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Aim 37 new CBs and support to 112 existing ones </li>...
2007 Evaluation <ul><li>In general most of the quantitive goals were achieved </li></ul><ul><li>However apart from the old...
2007 Evaluation (2) <ul><li>Given their small quantities most of the CBs are not an interesting partner for big buyers. </...
2007 Evaluation (3) <ul><li>Concept of steering group is mainly an instrument to ease communication with ICCO and in the p...
Lessons learned / Dilemma <ul><li>Mixture of objectives : CB concept was for food security, not business oriented. </li></...
Lessons learned / Dilemma <ul><li>Their involvement in economic activities does not provide the NGO’s hope for their finan...
Elements for another track <ul><li>There are a number of dynamic CBs/F.O.s that manage to grow and provide benefits to the...
Elements for another track <ul><li>Other ICCO partners are involved in strengthening of agricultural marketing co-operativ...
Medium track <ul><li>As the fast track (JdlRB) is not at all farmers oriented, but commodity oriented it does not really c...
Medium track <ul><li>Focus would be on training of leaders and staff by specialised institutions and by exchange visits an...
Medium track <ul><li>Advising F.O.’s in linking up with service providers and fellow cooperatives. </li></ul><ul><li>Make ...
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Promotion of Cereal Banks and Access to Markets for Farmers in Ethiopia - Evaluation

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Presentation to the DREO team, November 2007

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Transcript of "Promotion of Cereal Banks and Access to Markets for Farmers in Ethiopia - Evaluation"

  1. 1. Promotion of Cereal Banks and Access to Markets for Farmers in Ethiopia - Evaluation Presentation to the ICCO – DREO team 01.11.2007
  2. 2. NGO’s or Enterpreneurs <ul><li>Presentation will refer to ICCO’s dilemma to chose between its historical partners (NGO’s) and specialised organisations in developing value chains for resource poor farmers. </li></ul><ul><li>Joost de la Rive Box reflected on this dilemma in april 2006 and sees two tracks in ICCO’s Africa Program: a fast track and a slow track. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Fast track : caracteristics <ul><li>Clear track – a business plan shows the financial sustainability within some years </li></ul><ul><li>Service delivery to farmers is embedded in commercial transactions </li></ul><ul><li>Business (oriented) people are in charge of the chain development process </li></ul><ul><li>ICCO’s approval of the project is based upon a pro-active identification and objective analysis of advantages for target group </li></ul>
  4. 4. Slow track : caracteristicss <ul><li>Existing (social) partners are stimulated to facilitate economic activities for target group. Hope for their own survival. </li></ul><ul><li>Specific expertise needs to be build from scratch </li></ul><ul><li>Room for internal conflicts in terms of vision and policy that may hinder economic program </li></ul><ul><li>Longterm dependancy on (ICCO) subsidies. No clear measurable indicators for sustainability. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Cereal Bank ≠ Value Chains <ul><li>At that time Joost de la Rive Box also questioned the choice for cereals to develop value chains in Ethiopia. </li></ul><ul><li>Added value for cereals might be too low to provide all actors with a decent income. </li></ul><ul><li>Mixing up social goals (food-security) and economic ones (increased income) creates an ambigious situation. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Program objectives <ul><li>Overall: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Secured cash income for farmers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved food security at family level </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Specific: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced capacity of autonomous F.O.’s and networks for better access to good markets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced capacity of the implementing NGOs to promote autnomous F.O.’s and of FFARM (service provider) for new market system development </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Actors involved <ul><li>Five different NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>A service provider FFARM </li></ul><ul><li>Permanent technical assistance CIDR </li></ul><ul><li>ICCO country representative </li></ul><ul><li>Specific technical assistance : I/C and </li></ul><ul><li>Through Learning Alliance : KIT, SNV, IIRR </li></ul><ul><li>About 200 CBs in various parts of Oromiya State </li></ul>
  8. 8. Program indicators <ul><li>Two years : 2006 – 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Aim 37 new CBs and support to 112 existing ones </li></ul><ul><li>12 CB networks promoted </li></ul><ul><li>2 interfaces </li></ul><ul><li>3 entreprises doing regular trade with CBs </li></ul><ul><li>Replaced a 4 year program rejected by EU </li></ul><ul><li>Steering group (5 NGO’s and FFARM + CIDR) </li></ul>
  9. 9. 2007 Evaluation <ul><li>In general most of the quantitive goals were achieved </li></ul><ul><li>However apart from the older ones, CBs remain extremely weak, both financially and in terms of human capacity. </li></ul><ul><li>Training for CBs is too limited and too general </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the CBs largely depend on the NGO’s </li></ul><ul><li>CBs are not a solution for farmers’ problems (lack of cash at harvest time, good price) </li></ul>
  10. 10. 2007 Evaluation (2) <ul><li>Given their small quantities most of the CBs are not an interesting partner for big buyers. </li></ul><ul><li>FFARM provides support mainly to the NGO’s and especially to their head offices. </li></ul><ul><li>Support to CBs goes mainly to building the store and buying equipment. Only 2% goes to training and 0,5% to networking (which was a goal that was not achieved). </li></ul><ul><li>CB networks were not promoted. </li></ul>
  11. 11. 2007 Evaluation (3) <ul><li>Concept of steering group is mainly an instrument to ease communication with ICCO and in the past to exchange experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>There is quite a difference between individual CBs and NGOs, everyone has its own dynamic. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Alliance on value chain development is a good initiative but dominated again by NGOs. </li></ul><ul><li>Value chain development focuses on CIDR concept of interfaces (soy bean = new crop, and Niger seed) = long process, no impact yet. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Lessons learned / Dilemma <ul><li>Mixture of objectives : CB concept was for food security, not business oriented. </li></ul><ul><li>Main objectives of NGOs are social ones, CBs are an (important) (side) activity. </li></ul><ul><li>No specialised staff in most of the NGOs. </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity building process is very slow : CIDR -> FFARM -> NGO Head office -> NGO Field office -> few CB leaders </li></ul>
  13. 13. Lessons learned / Dilemma <ul><li>Their involvement in economic activities does not provide the NGO’s hope for their financial survival. </li></ul><ul><li>So why involving social NGO’s in value chain development. </li></ul><ul><li>There must be more efficient and effective ways to help poor farmers increase their income through value chains. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Elements for another track <ul><li>There are a number of dynamic CBs/F.O.s that manage to grow and provide benefits to the farmers. </li></ul><ul><li>Due to urbanization and industrialisation there is an increasing demand for cereals/grains. Given the rich biodiversity in Ethiopia both mass and niche markets can be served. Cereals can be(come) value chains. (Are all actors adding value?) </li></ul>
  15. 15. Elements for another track <ul><li>Other ICCO partners are involved in strengthening of agricultural marketing co-operatives. </li></ul><ul><li>The Ethiopian Co-operative Promotion Bureau is open minded and willing to support other coops. </li></ul><ul><li>Exchange visits with other African F.O.’s would enlighten CB leaders. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Medium track <ul><li>As the fast track (JdlRB) is not at all farmers oriented, but commodity oriented it does not really contribute to the building of a strong civil society in Ethiopia. </li></ul><ul><li>A medium track at the pace of F.O.’s and controlled by them could be an alternative approach. </li></ul><ul><li>This would include a short transition period where NGO’s or FFARM get the assignment to assist market oriented CB to form a network. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Medium track <ul><li>Focus would be on training of leaders and staff by specialised institutions and by exchange visits and attending regional workshops. </li></ul><ul><li>Training both visionary and technical skills to make F.O.s reliable partners. </li></ul><ul><li>2nd focus on establishing trade relations with big buyers and processors(quantityand quality, and special varieties, and packaging/grading). </li></ul>
  18. 18. Medium track <ul><li>Advising F.O.’s in linking up with service providers and fellow cooperatives. </li></ul><ul><li>Make F.O.’s real owner of the program and agree about sub-contracting various service providers </li></ul>

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