Accounting for Tourism: Alignment Across Scales and Boundaries | Rachel Dunk

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  • Who is here and what do you do?
  • Accounting for Tourism: Alignment Across Scales and Boundaries | Rachel Dunk

    1. 1. Accounting for Tourism:alignment across scales and boundaries Wednesday 6th February, 11am – 1pm Chaired by: Dr Rachel Dunk, Crichton Carbon Centre
    2. 2. Workshop Programme11.00-11.10 Welcome and Introductions11.10-11.25 Feedback from last year’s activities, todays key questions and survey responses11:25-11:45 Janie Neumann (Visit Scotland) - Quality and Sustainability11:45-11:50 Q&A11.50-12:10 Stuart Park (GTBS) - Carbon Monitoring for GTBS Members12.10-12.15 Q&A12:15-12:45 Break Out Group Discussions – Addressing the Key Questions12.45-13:00 Feedback to the Group and Close
    3. 3. ICARB: The Initiative for Carbon AccountingWe are a group of academics, policy makers andprofessionals working to create a set oftransparent, consistent and accurate rules forcarbon accounting.We exist to advance the field of carbon accountingto facilitate the reductions in carbon emissionsnecessary for a sustainable society.Supported by
    4. 4. ICARB: Approach and StakeholdersOur approach is inclusive and collaborative –consensus building.Our (Tourism) stakeholders include:• Tourism agencies (national and regional)• Industry groups & bodies• Tourism businesses• Policy makers• Academics• Carbon / Env. / Sust. managers & consultants• Other 3rd sector / support organisations
    5. 5. ICARB: What resources are available?• Presentations from workshops and conferences• Experts’ Directory• News, blog and discussion• Resources• Toolssee http://icarb.orgJoin the ICARB Mailing List to keep up to datewith latest news and events.
    6. 6. 5th International Conference on Carbon Accounting: Towards Rules and Tools for Carbon Accounting in Scotland Wed 13th March, Heriot Watt University, EdinburghSpeakers include: Garvin Heath, NREL, Denver Angela Druckman, RESOLVE, Surrey University Daniel Hinze, Scottish Government Adam Hawkes, Imperial College London Gary Davis, Ecometrica Frazer Wilson, Pricewaterhouse Coopers Sarah Boyack MSPRegister at:http://icarbconference.org/
    7. 7. Review of Last Years Activities1st Stakeholder Workshop• Made first steps towards forming a stakeholder group• Considered which tourism actors – are core tourism businesses (in the rule book) – are supporting businesses (data needed from them for determining footprint of the ‘core’ tourism business) – should facilitate / support carbon measurement and reduction in the tourism sector• Proposed sub-categorisation of core tourism businesses• Identified potentially significant Scope 3 (supply chain) emission sources that should be included in carbon accounting
    8. 8. Revised Industry Engagement Model Technical Method Development Workshops / Activities Refined Methods Pilot Dissemination & CPD / Skills Training Workshops / Development Activities Best Practice Case Studies Industry Pilots / Road Testing
    9. 9. Tourism – key outstanding issue• Transport and moving toward regional / destination level carbon accounting model for sustainable tourism Operational Context Departing Tourists Tourist Tourist Generating Transition Route Region Destination Region Returning Tourists Region Source: Leiper 1990
    10. 10. Objective for TodayExpand the Stakeholder GroupAnswer the Key Questions...1. What should a carbon accounting tool look like (be able to do) to meet the needs of all stakeholders from small businesses to support agencies and policy makers2. Tourism and Transport – Whose responsibility do you think it is to measure and reduce emissions from tourism related transport? – How would you evaluate visitor travel? – What data is needed? Who should collect it?
    11. 11. Tourism Sector Survey – Initial Results• ~10 questions addressing standards, guidance, the desired characteristics and role of carbon accounting in the tourism sector• 35 registered workshop attendees, of which 19 completed the surveyASK: we would like to increase the response ratein advance of the conference – we would begrateful for your assistance in circulating the link tocolleagues and clients with an interest in carbonaccounting / sustainability management (andencouraging them to complete the survey)
    12. 12. Involvement with C Accounting - FrequencyNever – Very OftenActivity % Ave MaxDeveloping Carbon Accounting 74% Sometimes Very OftenStandards, Methodologies or GuidanceInternal User 68% Sometimes Very OftenProvide Sustainability Support Services 67% Sometimes Very Often Regularly/OfteCM Trainer 53% Very Often nProvide CM Support Services 33% Sometimes Very OftenRegistered Verifier of Sustainability Regularly/Ofte 24% Very OftenScheme n Regularly/OfteRegistered Verifier of a QA Scheme 11% Sometimes nRegistered Verifier of a CM Scheme 0% Never Never We have a lot of expertise in the room
    13. 13. Reasons for Carbon Accounting - RankForced RankingReason Overall Range Mode RankReducing Carbon Emissions 1 (2.5) 1-4 2 (7)Sustainability - People, Planet, Profit =2 (2.7) 1-6 1 (7)Protecting the Environment =2 (2.7) 1-5 1&2 (5)Reducing Costs 4 (3.1) 1-6 2&3 (5)Corporate Social Responsibility 5 (4.9) 2-6 5 (8)New Markets / Customer Demand 6 (5.1) 1-6 6 (11) Different to business views?
    14. 14. Business Drivers Not a StrongBusiness Drivers Motivator Motivator MotivatorReducing operating costs 2% 44% 54%Meeting customer demands and 4% 44% 52%expectationsPersonal Interest 9% 43% 47%Avoiding negative public relations and 12% 61% 28%being good neighboursAchieving a competitive advantage 18% 50% 33%Meeting association membership criteria 27% 55% 18%Complying with internal company policies 22% 42% 37%Complying with UK and Scottish 31% 54% 14%Regulations Pryor et al., in prep
    15. 15. Carbon Accounting Criteria - ImportanceNot at all – Very ImportantCriteria Ran Range Mode Ave k Moderate-Robustness 1 Very (9) Very Very Moderate-Accuracy 2 Very (8) Important Very Moderate-Justifiability 3 Very (7) Important VeryStakeholder/Funder Moderate- 4 Important (7) ImportantReporting VeryInternal Decision-Making 5 Slightly-Very Important (6) ImportantPublic Reporting 6 Slightly-Very Important (9) ImportantMandatory Reporting Important = 7 Slightly-Very ImportantStandards Very (6)Voluntary Reporting Everything is Important – Moderate- 8 methods must be Robust but Moderate (8) Important above allStandards Very
    16. 16. Carbon Accounting Aspects - ImportanceNot at all – Very ImportantAspect Ave Rk Aspect Ave R k Comparison within ImportanEasy to Apply Very 1 8 Sector tComparison to Comparison between Importan Very 2 9Benchmark Organisations t ImportanDirection of Change Important 3 External Verification 10 t Comparison between ImportanChange over Time Important 4 11 Projects tEffectiveness of Comparison between ImportanEmission Reducing Important 5 12 Products tActionsEffectiveness of Comparison between ModeratBehaviour Change Important 6 13 Sectors eActionsMagnitude of Change Important 7
    17. 17. Comparing Carbon Inventories - DifficultyEasy – Very DifficultComparison Average Range ModeWithin Organisation – Neither Easy – Very Easy = Difficult (4)Over TimeWithin Sector –Between Difficult Neither – Very Difficult (4)OrganisationsBetween Sectors Difficult Neither – Very Very (5) Around half of respondents answered don’t know / never
    18. 18. Discussion Groups Janie Stuart Steven Louise Edwards Mehriban Nazarova Anar Gurbanzade Aysel Mustafayeva Yizhu Bao Lala ImanovaShabnam Farzaliyeva Alisah Shrestha Aynur Piriyeva Gunay Huseynova Gunay Ismayilova Wai Him Chan Amanda Krats Heather Campbell Lisa Mcdade Areej Riaz Arzu Tairguliyeva Sui Lian Lim Ewan Hyslop Warren McIntyre Ben Twist Kenneth Wardrop Emma Sinclair Jane Ali-Knight Corinne Doff Sue Roaf Ruth Monfries Anna Scott Scott Brady Keith Baker
    19. 19. Key Questions1. What should a carbon accounting tool look like (be able to do) to meet the needs of all stakeholders from small businesses to support agencies and policy makers2. Tourism and Transport – Whose responsibility do you think it is to measure and reduce emissions from tourism related transport? – How would you evaluate visitor travel? – What data is needed? Who should collect it?

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