Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Personal Learning Environments and Psychological Ownership

15,261

Published on

Psychological Ownership and Personal Learning Environments: Do possession and control really matter? - Presentation delivered at the PLE Conference 2012 in Aveiro, Portugal, 12 July 2012, #PLECONF

Psychological Ownership and Personal Learning Environments: Do possession and control really matter? - Presentation delivered at the PLE Conference 2012 in Aveiro, Portugal, 12 July 2012, #PLECONF

Published in: Education, Technology
2 Comments
21 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
15,261
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
2
Likes
21
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Psychological Ownership and PLEs: Do possession and control really matter? http://data.whicdn.com/images/4809831/tumblr_lb5zer6mle1qd2tsxo1_500_thumb.jpg Prof. Dr. Ilona Buchem Digital Media Studies, Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin, Germany PLE Conference 2012, 12.07.2012, Aveiro (Portugal)Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 2. What ownership and control have to do with Personal Learning Environments? http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fVp9oiEsSIU/T2_TTN2FB5I/AAAAAAAACsA/hikr9gHRvQw/s1600/barefootbooks3.jpg Ownership and control emerged as core concepts in the analysis of over 100 publications on Personal Learning environments based on the grounded theory: Buchem, Ilona, Attwell, Graham & Torres, Ricardo (2011). Understanding Personal Learning Environments:Literature review and synthesis through the Activity Theory lens. Proceedings of the The PLE Conference 2011, 10th – 12th July 2011, Southampton, UK.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 3. Ownership and control as core categories emerging from grounded theory Buchem, Ilona, Attwell, Graham & Torres, Ricardo (2011). Understanding Personal Learning Environments: Literature review and synthesis through the Activity Theory lens. pp. 1-33. Proceedings of the The PLE Conference 2011, Southampton, UK.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 4. Does a learning environment become our PLE when we feel we own and control it? What does it mean to own and control a learning environment? Is there a theory, a scientific model we can use toconduct research on ownership in relation to PLEs?Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 5. The theory of psychological ownership 1.Pierce, J. L., Kostova, T., Dirks, K. (2001). Toward a theory of psychological ownership in organizations. Academy of Management Review, 26, p. 298–310. 2.Pierce, J. L., Kostova, T., Dirks, K. T. (2003). The state of psychological ownership: integrating and extending a century of research. Review of General Psychology, 7, p. 84– 107. 3.Van Dyne, L., Pierce, J.L. (2004). Psychological ownership and feelings of possession: three field studies predicting employee attitudes and organizational citizenship behavior. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25(4), p. 439-459.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 6. Psychological ownership Psychological ownership means that a person develops possessive feelings for a target. Targets encompass a range of “objects of psychological attachment”, such as an organization, a set of tools, design or ideas. Ownership relates to a psychological sense of possession and control. It is a cognitive-effective state: “It is mine!”Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 7. Can we incorporate the concept of psychological ownership from the organisational to educational context? It is my organisation! It is my learning environment! commitment satisfaction self-esteem performance citizenshipSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 8. Theory of psychological ownership Sense of responsibility Sense of identity Sense of accountability Sense of self-efficacy http://www.frontporchrepublic.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/home-ownership.jpg Sense of belongingnessSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 9. Sense of responsibility When we feel we own something, we feel responsible for protecting it and defending our rights. When we protect our possessions, we tend to make improvements, control or limit access by others. When we feel responsible for a target, we invest ourselves into it through energy, time and concern.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 10. Sense of identity We establish, maintain and reproduce self-identity through interactions with tangible and intangible targets, e.g. “this is my profession”. There are certain possession rituals, e.g. displaying and personalizing own possessions. These rituals transform the culturally prescribed meaning of targets to self-identity.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 11. Sense of accountability When we feel we own something, we expect from ourselves to be accountable for these targets. We also expect that others hold us accountable for the target. We feel accountable for what happens to and with targets, especially when we perceive the targets as extension of the self. http://www.hrea.org/erc/Library/First_Steps/image4.gifSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 12. Sense of self-efficacy Sense of self-efficacy relates to the belief in own competencies enabling successful performance in a specific task (Bandura, 1997). When we feel we own something, our self-efficacy may become stronger, e.g. we believe we can control/modify the target.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 13. Sense of belongingness Belongingness is a fundamental human need to belong, e.g. need for a home. When we feel we own something, we feel attached to it, e.g. to places, objects, people. “Having a place” is one of the strongest socio-emotional needs. http://www.zazzle.de/i_liebe_gehoren_t_shirt-235692423549328379Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 14. Questions of the study 1. How well can we measure psychological ownership related to such learning environments as ePortfolios, with items derived from the organizational context? 2. How is psychological ownership related to perceived control over the elements of a learning environment? 3. Is psychological ownership related to how students develop and use their ePortfolios? Is ePortfolio practice related to the quality of learning?Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 15. Conceptual model of the study Used in the study on psychological ownership related to ePortfolios The Antecedents-Consequences-Model (ACM) of the studySunday, July 15, 2012
  • 16. Hypotheses • Hypothesis 1: Design of ePortfolio will be related to students’ perception of control over the LE. • Hypothesis 2: Students’ perception of control will be related to the feeling of ownership of LE. • Hypothesis 3: Psychological ownership will be positively related to ePortfolio practice. • Hypothesis 4: ePortfolio practice will be related to the quality of learning. • Hypothesis 5: The perception of ePortfolios as PLEs will be related to perceived ownership of the LE*. *LE = Learning Environment, PLE = Personal Learning EnvironmentSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 17. Method of the study • Online survey in February 2012 • Students from Beuth University of Applied Sciences in Berlin and Augsburg University • Bachelor and master students in three different courses with integrated ePortfolio work (based on Mahara, WordPress).Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 18. Study sample 50 studentsSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 19. ResultsSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 20. • Question 1: How well can we measure psychological ownership of a learning environment (e.g. ePortfolio), with items derived from the organizational context?Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 21. Psychological ownership α = .94 ::: high internal consistency of the scale indicates that the proposed instrument can measure psychological ownership of learning environments well.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 22. • Hypothesis 1: Design of ePortfolio will be related to students’ perception of control over the learning environment, such that learner-centered ePortfolio design will be positively related to perceived control over the learning environment.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 23. Perceived control m = 2.01 ::: high level of perceived control indicates that learner-centered design of ePortfolios found its reflection in students’ perception of control.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 24. • Hypothesis 2: Students’ perception of control will be positively related to the concept of psychological ownership, such as the more students feel in control of their ePortfolios, the stronger the feeling of ownership of their ePortfolio.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 25. Perceived control: tangible vs. intangible targetsSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 26. Control of tangible/intangible targets and ownership Correlation Control of Ownership of Significant intangible targets ePortfolio r = .642 Correlation Control of Ownership of Not significant! tangible targets ePortfolio The more students feel in control of intangible elements of ePortfolios, the stronger the feeling of ownership.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 27. Does control of technology influence the feeling of being an “owner”? Model 1: Predictors: Control over tangible and intangible ePortfolio elements Model 1I: Predictor: Control over intangible ePortfolio elements Dependent variable: Ownership of ePortfolio Control over intangible ePortfolio elements is a much better predictor of ownership then control over tangible elements (such as technology).Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 28. • Hypothesis 3: Psychological ownership will be positively related to ePortfolio practice, such that the stronger the feeling of ownership, the more time, energy and effort is invested into ePortfolio practice.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 29. ePortfolio practice m = 3.05 > middle values for ePortfolio practiceSunday, July 15, 2012
  • 30. Does feeling an “owner” influence ePortfolio practice? Model 1: Predictor: Ownership of ePortfolio, Dependent variable: ePortfolio practice Psychological ownership is a very good predictor of ePortfolio practice (71% variance). Especially sense of responsibility, sense of self-identity and sense of accountability are strong predictors of how much time is invested in creating own ePortfolios.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 31. • Hypothesis 4: ePortfolio practice will be positively related to the quality of learning, such that the more time, energy and effort was invested, the higher the interest for the subject matter and intrinsic motivation to learn.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 32. ePortfolio practice and learning? ePortfolio practice is strongly related to the increase of interest in subject matter, and the perceived value of ePortfolio to present own competencies and demonstrate learning own learning outcomes.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 33. • Hypothesis 5: The perception of ePortfolios as PLEs will be positively related to perceived psychological ownership, such as the stronger the feeling of ownership, the more likely it is that the ePortfolio will be perceived as a Personal Learning Environment.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 34. • Results of this study indicate that being able to determine ePortfolio technology alone does not contribute much to students’ perception of ePortfolio as “my own” learning environment or Personal Learning Environment. • It can be hypothesized further that in order for such learning environments as ePortfolios to be perceived as Personal Learning Environments, users have to feel in control of such intangible elements as content, planning, personal data and access rights. • What seems to be more important for people to feel an “owner” of a learning environment may be able to take decisions about the way technologies are used for learning rather than to be able to determine the choice of technology itself.Sunday, July 15, 2012
  • 35. Thank you! Buchem, Ilona (2012). Psychological Ownership and Personal Learning Environments: Do possession and control really matter? Paper presented at the PLE Conference 2012 in Aveiro, Portugal. 12.07.2012.Sunday, July 15, 2012

×