SOA and APIs
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What is the difference between SOA and APIs? Is it just REST and SOAP? How do you take your SOA to the next level? Is SOA Governance completely different from API Management? This deck covers all the ...

What is the difference between SOA and APIs? Is it just REST and SOAP? How do you take your SOA to the next level? Is SOA Governance completely different from API Management? This deck covers all the questions related to SOA and APIs and will help you understand the API Economy.

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SOA and APIs Presentation Transcript

  • 1. © 2013 IBM CorporationSOA and APIsLaura (Olson) Heritage, Product Manager, API Management, IBMClaus T Jensen, STSM & Chief Architect, SOA Foundation Architecture, IBMSession Number Here
  • 2. 22 © 2013 IBM CorporationPlease NoteIBM’s statements regarding its plans, directions, and intent are subject to changeor withdrawal without notice at IBM’s sole discretion.Information regarding potential future products is intended to outline our generalproduct direction and it should not be relied on in making a purchasing decision.The information mentioned regarding potential future products is not acommitment, promise, or legal obligation to deliver any material, code orfunctionality. Information about potential future products may not be incorporatedinto any contract. The development, release, and timing of any future features orfunctionality described for our products remains at our sole discretion.Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBMbenchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performancethat any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, includingconsiderations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user’s job stream,the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed.Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve resultssimilar to those stated here.
  • 3. 33 © 2013 IBM CorporationWe love your Feedback!Don’t forget to submit your Impact session and speaker feedback!• Your feedback is very important to us – we use it to improve next year’sconference• Go to the Impact 2013 SmartSite (http://impactsmartsite/com):‒ Use the session ID number to locate the session‒ Click the “Take Survey” link‒ Submit your feedback
  • 4. 44 © 2013 IBM CorporationAgenda• Enter API Management• Myth and Hype between SOA and API• Architectural Approaches to Defining APIs
  • 5. 55 © 2013 IBM CorporationAgenda• Enter API Management• Myth and Hype between SOA and API• Architectural Approaches to Defining APIs
  • 6. 66 © 2013 IBM CorporationBusinesses are evolvingWebsiteSmartPhoneTabletPartnersConnectedAppliancesConnectedCarsGameConsolesInternetTVsTrillions2013 →WebsiteMillions~1999 - 2000stores (800) ###s web sitesNot having an API today is like nothaving a website in the 1990s…Consumers expect to access dataany time across multiple devicesCompanies can re-inventinteractions with customers,suppliers & partnersExplosion of potential clientsincreases opportunity, risk andinnovation
  • 7. 77 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Business of APIsGrow revenues…… While reducing overhead“$7bn worth of items on eBay through APIs”Mark Carges (Ebay CTO)The API which has easily 10 times more traffic then thewebsite, has been really very important to us.”Biz Stone (Co-founder, Twitter)“The adoption of Amazon’s Web services iscurrently driving more network activity theneverything Amazon does through theirtraditional web sites.”Jeff Bar (Amazon evangelist) / Dion Hinchcliffe(Journalist)
  • 8. 88 © 2013 IBM CorporationApps, APIs and API Mgmt…BusinessOwner ITDeveloperConsumersNew business opportunities• New markets• Increase customers• Enhance branding• Competitive advantageExtend development team•Increase innovation•Increase scalePartner/supplieralignmentBenefitsChallengesBusiness strategyInfrastructure• Security• Creation• ScalabilityOperational control• Publish• Analyze• Monitor
  • 9. 99 © 2013 IBM CorporationAPIs are Emerging Across All IndustriesEnergy andUtilitiesGovernment Healthcare Transportation RetailBanking Insurance Teleco Chemical/Petroleum Electronics
  • 10. 1010 © 2013 IBM CorporationCompanies Need to Become an EngagingEnterpriseAppsCustomerBusiness UserITEnterpriseApp Developer• Business Users want toengage Customers in newmarkets• They need to Externalize theEnterprise• They need to get Apps in frontof these Customers• Apps need APIs thatExternalize the Enterprise• App Developers use APIs• App Developers are nowExternal to the Enterprise• IT Guys need to secure, scaleand support the externalizedEnterprise• Business Users and IT Guysneeds Insights so they canrespond to business needsThe PlatformEnterprises wants to tap intoinnovation from a largecommunity of developers, notjust developers they employ
  • 11. 1111 © 2013 IBM CorporationAgenda• Enter API Management• Myth and Hype between SOA and API• Architectural Approaches to Defining APIs
  • 12. 1212 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myth and the HypeMyth: API management is completely different from SOA and SOA willbog you downAPI Management SOA• At the Approach Level: Both need a direct link to business outcomes‒ API Management traditionally outward facing in opening new mobile channels more directly bringing revenue in‒ SOA historically tending to be more focused on organizational transformation and architectural approach for creatingan agile business, often with a more indirect effect on the business bottom line• At the Consumer Level: Both foster reuse and agility‒ API Management consumers tend to be greater in number and not well known‒ SOA consumers tend to be more well defined and smaller in number• At the Technical Level:‒ API Management offers easy more open use with REST/JSON approach‒ API Management offers easier consumption and governance models‒ SOA initiatives relied mostly on SOAP based services which are more structured and well defined‒ SOA had a more well defined approach to governance with service management
  • 13. 1313 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myth and the HypeMyth: API management is completely different from SOA and SOA willbog you down• All APIs are Services• Not all APIs are goodServices• Not all Services make goodAPIsAPI Management is aNatural Extension of SOAAPI Management andService Management areconverging for a more agileapproach both inside andoutside the enterprise
  • 14. 1414 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myth and the HypeMyth 2: SOAP is Dead• Does Anything in Technology Ever Die?‒ Look at COBOL• Quote from Customer: “Nothing ever dies in the banks”• Does it still have its purposes? Yes, Perhaps, Maybe, Depends.. SOAPis not just legacy
  • 15. 1515 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myth and The HypeMyth 3: “APIs are always REST”• Didn’t your mom teach you to never use always and never?• However, if you are going external and trying to drive adoptionREST is the love of most developers today because it’s easy• Better suited for mobile development• For inside the enterprise it’s beginning to be the flavor of choice aswell
  • 16. 1616 © 2013 IBM CorporationWhat is an Web API? An web API is a public persona for an enterprise; exposing defined assets,data or services for public consumption An web API is simple for app developers to use, access and understand An web API can be easily invoked via a browser, mobile device, etc.What Value Does an Web API Provide? Extends an enterprise and opens new markets and channels by allowing externalapp developers to easily leverage, publicize and/or aggregate a company’sassets for broad-based consumptionWhat “assets, data or services”are exposed via an Web API?: Product catalogs Phone listings Insurance cases Order status Bank loan ratesLets Further Define the World of APIsExternalApp Developer
  • 17. 1717 © 2013 IBM CorporationGreat…but what is SOA?A repeatablebusiness task –e.g., check customercredit; open newaccountA ServiceA way of thinking aboutyour business throughlinked services and theoutcomes that theybringService OrientationService OrientedArchitecture (SOA)An business-centric architecturalapproach based on serviceoriented principles
  • 18. 1818 © 2013 IBM CorporationAPI Management Tendencies are Adopted Acrossthe Board From Inside to Outside the EnterpriseCreating a New Era Platform• Today Customers RapidlyAdopting REST Internally• Want the Same Self-ServiceControl Model and Control asexternal API Management• Want the fast innovation acrossall areas of business• Developers like REST better thenSOAP• Taking their SOA to the NextLevelEnterpriseAPIsPartner APIExternal API
  • 19. 1919 © 2013 IBM Corporation… and SOA Principles are at the Core of New EraPlatform Initiatives1960- 1990- 2010-TimeReachTransactionSystemsMainframe, IMSand CICSWebSphere,Information ManagementNew Era PlatformsWeb, e-businessand SOAMobile, Cloud,Big Data
  • 20. 2020 © 2013 IBM CorporationPartners SuppliersDevelopersCustomersAPIsApps PatternsCloudServices… and needs to integrate more and more things 2005: Connecting and mediating in an ITtransactional context 2010: Connecting and mediating e2e processes 2015: Connecting and mediating people,devices, Cloud, ….
  • 21. 2121 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myths and The HypeMyth 4: “API management is SOA governance rebranded”• API Management - APIs Are a Product ThereforeNeed to Be Managed Like One‒ Need Business Model for Each API (Free, DeveloperPays, Developer Gets Paid, etc)‒ Need a Marketing Plan‒ Need Legal Reviews‒ Need Analytic Reports Reporting back to the Business‒ Need to define developer management strategy‒ Need to be very rapid in response to market• SOA Governance – Presides over entire enterprise‒ Establishing Organizational Transformation‒ Enterprise Business Vision and IT alignment‒ Service Development Lifecycle‒ Service Portfolio Management‒ Change management‒ Procurement of resources‒ Longer process• API management is a natural extension of SOAgovernance
  • 22. 2222 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myths and The HypeMyth 5: “No governance is needed with API management, this allowscompanies to innovate faster”• Good Luck with That!• Remember External APIs are a product and yourcompany’s external persona• Some form of governance is necessaryWild Wild West
  • 23. 2323 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myths and The HypeMyth 6: “APIs are not versioned”• That’s like saying you don’t need to change ababy’s diaper• They are versioned and you need to managethe change and protect your consumers‒ Don’t expose minor version changes to theconsumers. You don’t want it to appear that you arechanging your APIs on them all the time. Theywon’t build a business on your APIs if you do.• Remember APIs are a product and yourcompany’s external persona. Version wisely!
  • 24. 2424 © 2013 IBM CorporationSystems of interaction provide lifecycle management across
  • 25. 2525 © 2013 IBM CorporationThe Myths and The Hype• Myth: “You only need one ‘bus’ ”‒ We have a different opinion, gateways and integration buses fulfill importantlydifferent topological roles. With that said, some use cases require only agateway, other use cases only an integration bus and yet others require both• Myth: “You don’t need to integrate your API management solution withany other middleware”‒ If not, then how are you going to share metadata about available data,services, endpoints etc.? And how are you going to manage and enforcepolicies all the way from the point of engagement to the point of record?
  • 26. 2626 © 2013 IBM CorporationAgenda• Enter API Management• Myth and Hype between SOA and API• Architectural Approaches to Defining APIs
  • 27. 2727 © 2013 IBM CorporationArchitectural approaches to defining APIs• APIs are an extension of existing service integration and creation‒ APIs can be aggregated from multiple existing services• APIs are being created out of non-SOA assets‒ The API itself is nicely defined, but its realization is “ad hoc”• APIs are a technical veneer on existing resources‒ There is no particular architecture or design behind the APIs, they are createdad hoc for point use, essentially pushing EAI approaches into the API space• New Engaging Enterprise APIs are created from scratch‒ Particularly relevant where the APIs represent an expansion of previousbusiness scope (Amazon’s merchant API is one such example, it was built forAPI purposes from the start); APIs are created as a business approach toreach new markets
  • 28. 2828 © 2013 IBM CorporationBusiness approaches to defining API’s• Internal use for driving agility‒ Focus: Agile end-to-end processes• External business partner use‒ Focus: Integration existing ecosystem• External use for capturing new markets and driving adoption‒ Focus: Extending ecosystem outreach• Both internal and external use‒ Focus: Holistic API management strategy enterprise wide
  • 29. 2929 © 2013 IBM CorporationArchitectural approaches to defining API’s• APIs are an extension of existing service integration and creation‒ Targeted for internal and/or external use‒ Designed for reuse by many apps‒ Realized via connecting to an (Enterprise Service) Integration Bus‒ May aggregate across internal and public cloud services, but in most casescomposition is handled in the (Enterprise Service0 Integration Bus‒ Typically enterprise class QoS
  • 30. 3030 © 2013 IBM CorporationArchitectural approaches to defining API’s• APIs are being created our of non-SOA assets‒ Targeted for internal and/or external use‒ Designed for reuse‒ Realized directly from packaged apps, cloud services, existing backendsystems etc., using adapters available within the API environment‒ Aggregation, when needed, happens within the API managed environment‒ QoS typically inherited from the backend realization
  • 31. 3131 © 2013 IBM CorporationArchitectural approaches to defining API’s• APIs are a technical veneer on existing resources‒ Targeted for internally developed mobile apps (typically driven by getting amobile app released)‒ Not designed for reuse‒ Realized as a thin veneer on top of existing systems‒ Aggregation, when needed, happens within the API managed environment‒ QoS inherited from the backend realization
  • 32. 3232 © 2013 IBM CorporationArchitectural approaches to defining API’s• New Engaging Enterprise APIs are created from scratch‒ Targeted for external use, aiming solely at an ecosystem beyond theenterprise‒ Maybe designed for reuse‒ Implemented created from scratch (often using big data, analytics, socialtechnologies)‒ No full-fledged composition, but leveraging various connectors to datasources and transformations as needed‒ QoS can vary widely, often the requirements are much lower than for classicalenterprise systems (“good enough” approach)
  • 33. 3333 © 2013 IBM CorporationSummary• The concepts of SOA and APIs are highly synergistic• APIs provide SOA with a way to reach beyond the controlledenvironment of the enterprise• SOA provides APIs with acceleration and proven design principles• Defining a strategy for how to merge SOA and API management will beimportant (long term) to most enterprises…• … and this does include a middleware strategy for how to source andintegrate gateway capabilities and integration bus capabilities
  • 34. 3434 © 2013 IBM Corporation
  • 35. 3535 © 2013 IBM CorporationLegal Disclaimer• © IBM Corporation 2013. All Rights Reserved.• The information contained in this publication is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information containedin this publication, it is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which aresubject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this publication or any other materials. Nothingcontained in this publication is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms andconditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software.• References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/orcapabilities referenced in this presentation may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment tofuture product or feature availability in any way. 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