Paraphrasing 07.29.2013
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Paraphrasing 07.29.2013

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Restating Another Work ini Your Own Words

Restating Another Work ini Your Own Words

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Paraphrasing 07.29.2013 Paraphrasing 07.29.2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Paraphrasing Paraphrasing: Restating Another Work in Your Own Words Prepared by Dr. Andree Swanson AC Swanson Group, Highlands Ranch, CO Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013 Academic WritingAcademic Writing 1Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.
  •  What is paraphrasing?  Why do we use paraphrasing?  Citing your source  Include the in-text or parenthetical citation  No need to include page or paragraph number  Reducing the number of quotes in a paper 2Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Question  You’ve been asked to paraphrase a paragraph for a paper? How do you do it? 3Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Answer  You are turning the words that you read into your own words.  You avoid:  Including your opinion  Using a quote from the source  It is as if you are translating the words from the author’s to yours. 4Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • 5Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Question  You can easily put the section that you want to use in quotes, cite the source, and then avoid plagiarism; however, your faculty member says: “You need to avoid too many long quotes”. So, what do you do? 6Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Answer  You need to put the work in your own words  Otherwise you are stealing someone else’s work  A good paraphrase is exact, complete, and in your own words  You must cite your source 7Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  •  Remember… there is no new information in the world  Unless you are working on your doctoral dissertation and coming up with new concepts, theories, and material, you are presenting someone else’s ideas in your research paper or thesis. 8Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Think like an auditor… What does this mean?  It is your paper trail to your resource.  If you find a citation within the text, you can be assured (if done right), that there will be a corresponding reference on your Works Cited (MLA) or Reference (APA) page. 9Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Here is an example using an exact quote  The teacher entered into a contract with the school district to work at a specific school. “The classical definition of a contract is a legally binding agreement made between two or more person” (Carby-Hall, 2003, p. 24). 10Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • Here is an example using a paraphrase  The teacher entered into a contract with the school district to work at a specific school. A contract is a compulsory agreement between at least two people. A contract can be held up in court. It is a legal document (Carby-Hall, 2003). 11Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • The teacher entered into a contract with the school district to work at a specific school. A contract is a compulsory agreement between at least two people. A contract can be held up in court. It is a legal document (Carby-Hall, 2003).  Note that the page or paragraph number is not included when you paraphrase. 12Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  •  Essentially the ONLY time that you should use a quotation is when your source states:  an opinion that someone may question,  presents a vivid description of a personal feeling or personal historical event,  defines a term,  makes a statement that you cannot reasonably paraphrase,  or makes a statement that you want to argue against in considerable detail. 13Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  •  Pay attention to how many quotes that you use.  If more than 5-10% of your paper consists of quotations, you must have very sound justification for having so many quotes.  Avoid placing one quote after another. 14Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  •  Scholarly journals normally indicate that if more than 30% of the information in your paper comes from any single source, then you must co-author your paper with that other author.  This is a major reason that you must use more than one source for your paper and/or presentation. 15Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  •  Avoid the temptation to read an article and copy that author's thought pattern (ideas) into your own paper.  This is similar to creating a computer program that has a similar look and feel" to another program without obtaining permission.  Many companies have lost millions of dollars for such acts.  The written version is called plagiarism and also has cost authors their reputations and/or substantial lawsuit settlements. 16Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • When in doubt, ask your faculty member. He/she will be able to coach you through the process of paraphrasing. 17Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013
  • 18Image(s) from Microsoft Clip Art.Copyright © AC Swanson Group 2009 - 2013