• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Data Journalist Playbook
 

Data Journalist Playbook

on

  • 684 views

Music industry analytics and insights provider Next Big Sound details the role of a Data Journalist at a fast moving startup.

Music industry analytics and insights provider Next Big Sound details the role of a Data Journalist at a fast moving startup.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
684
Views on SlideShare
474
Embed Views
210

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

4 Embeds 210

http://www.iaventures.com 200
http://digg.com 8
http://localhost 1
http://www.feedspot.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Data Journalist Playbook Data Journalist Playbook Document Transcript

    •  Data  Journalist  Playbook      Table  of  Contents:    1. Company  Description  2. Hiring  a  Data  Journalist  3. The  Interview  Process  4. What  is  a  Data  Journalist?  Getting  Started  5. Learning  the  History  of  Data  Journalism:  The  First  Quarter  6. Taking  it  a  Step  Further:  Key  Skills  for  a  Data  Journalist  7. Appendix  1  i. The  Final  Posted  Job  Description  ii. Content  Marketing  Companies  to  Reference  iii. Interview  Timeline  iv. Pitch  Challenge  During  Interview  Process  v. Pitch  Evaluation  Criteria  vi. First  Month  Music  Data  Journalist  Goals  8. Appendix  2  Resources  for  a  Data  Journalist            
    •  Chapter  1.  Company  Description    What  is  Next  Big  Sound?    For  three  years,  the  Next  Big  Sound  team  has  been  gathering  data  on  hundreds  of  thousands  of  artists  in  an  effort  to  provide  the  music  industry  with  a  revolutionary  method  of  tracking  progress,  fan  base  and  growth.      Between  the  information  we  can  glean  from  social  media  websites  such  as  Twitter  and  Facebook,  streaming  services  like  Spotify,  Rdio  and  Pandora,  radio  airplay  as  well  as  proprietary  data  on  both  physical  and  digital  sales,  we  are  in  the  position  to  offer  a  unique  product  to  customers,  whether  they  be  major  record  labels,  agents  or  the  artists  themselves.      Linking  this  data  to  events  or  particular  marketing  approaches  such  as  live  Twitter  interviews,  the  launch  of  a  new  album,  or  an  active  presence  in  social  networks,  allows  the  industry  to  track  how  certain  strategies  impact  the  artist  and  their  standing,  what  garners  the  most  positive  fan  reactions,  what  social  networking  efforts  translate  into  sales  and  much,  much  more.      With  this  knowledge  in  hand,  they  are  able  to  plan  better  strategies,  and  understand  the  dos  and  don’ts  for  artist  trying  to  make  it  in  an  ever-­‐changing  music  industry.      It  should  come  as  a  surprise  to  no  one  that  the  world  is  becoming  increasingly  interconnected  through  social  networks,  and  the  same  is  true  for  music  fans.  A  fan  in  Japan  can  discuss  the  merits  of  their  favorite  artist  with  their  counterpart  in  Dubai  in  real-­‐time  (time  difference  notwithstanding).  In  addition,  this  coming  year  will  mark  the  first  in  which  digital  downloads  surpass  physical  sales.  Music  is  more  accessible  to  the  masses  and  DIY  artists  are  showing  time  and  time  again  that  it  is  possible  to  make  it  on  
    •  your  own  by  taking  advantage  of  these  networks  -­‐  crowdsourcing  funds  for  tours,  self-­‐publishing  their  music  and  videos  and  connecting  with  fans.    Next  Big  Sound  will  continue  to  grow  over  the  coming  years,  we  are  tirelessly  working  to  formulate  the  algorithms  that  will  allow  us  answer  some  of  the  biggest  questions  in  the  music  industry  today.                                              
    •  Chapter  2.  Hiring  A  Data  Journalist    Alex  White,  CEO,  explains  the  rationale  behind  the  hire.      As  a  company  dedicated  to  providing  analytics  to  the  music  business,  a  large  part  of  Next  Big  Sound’s  job  is  to  educate  music  industry  professionals  on  not  only  the  possibilities  for  concrete  uses  of  data  in  their  day  to  day  roles,  as  well  as  the  growing  importance  of  this.  Two  years  in  we  were  seeing  great  traction  in  our  enterprise  sales,  a  changing  cast  of  competition,  and  a  wildly  shifting  industry  transitioning  from  the  old  way  of  doing  things  to  a  less  certain  digital  frontier.  Increasingly,  our  customers,  and  potential  customers,  were  turning  to  us  with  questions  of  how  to  navigate  the  modern  music  industry.    We  learned  early  on  that  the  only  scalable  way  to  help  our  customers  and  the  industry  do  their  jobs  better  was  to  build  great  software  and  publish  our  thoughts  on  the  macro  state  of  things  that  we  were  uniquely  privy  to  given  our  worldwide  data  set.  When  we  first  started  the  company  I  was  responsible  for  producing  this  content  for  marketing  and  awareness  of  the  company.  This  responsibility  passed  to  our  first  head  of  customer  support  but  her  bandwidth  for  producing  regular  content  quickly  shrank  as  customers  came  on  board  and  demand  for  the  product  and  support  rose.  As  a  board  and  management  team  we  quickly  realized  that  we  needed  to  hire  someone  dedicated  to  helping  us  own  mindshare  around  data  and  the  music  industry.  This  competency  on  staff  would  accelerate  our  march  to  become  the  music  industry  standard,  which,  in  turn,  allows  us  to  build  a  large  and  lucrative  business.    We  debated  between  hiring  a  business  analyst  or  a  data  journalist  for  this  role  but  decided  that  communicating  the  analysis  around  the  data  was  as  important  as  the  analysis  itself.  The  decision  to  hire  the  world’s  first  music  data  journalist  was  made.  But  what  was  the  best  way  to  find  and  screen  candidates?  We’d  hired  salesmen,  software  
    •  engineers,  and  designers  but  no  one  in  the  world  had  ever  hired  a  music  data  journalist  before.  Unfortunately  there  was  no  template  to  follow.  I  worked  with  Antony  Bruno,  a  former  writer  for  Billboard,  to  help  craft  the  role,  screening  process,  and  evaluate  candidates.      We  narrowed  down  the  ideal  skillset  to  four  key  components:    1.  Storytelling:  able  to  take  data  and  extract  and  produce  insightful  narrative  2.  Analytical:  comfortable  in  Excel  and  able  to  proof  underlying  math  and  statistics  before  releasing  to  customers.  3.  Design  sense:  able  to  take  findings  and  compile  professional  looking  blog  posts,  presentation  decks,  and  PDFs  4.  Music  industry  knowledge:  experience  in  the  music  industry  to  help  inform  reports  that  would  be  interesting  to  our  customers  *Note:  we  had  programming  ability  but  decided  to  remove  this  and  add  it  as  a  bonus  in  the  background  section.      We  decided  to  follow  our  typical  hiring  process  of  quick  phone  screens  of  promising  resumes,  48-­‐hour  challenges,  in-­‐person  interviews,  and  then  a  job  offer  to  the  top  candidate.  We  were  quickly  overwhelmed  with  hundreds  of  resumes  and  decided  that  instead  of  the  phone  screen,  we  would  solicit  story  pitches  from  the  most  promising  candidates,  narrow  that  pool  down  to  the  best  5-­‐10  and  then  surprise  them  by  having  them  have  to  turn  that  into  a  full  story  with  data  from  Next  Big  Sound.  The  purpose  of  this  exercise  was  to  mimic  the  actual  work,  deadlines  and  short  notice  included,  as  much  as  possible.  For  a  complete  view  of  the  job  description  we  used,  interview  timeline  we  stuck  to,  pitch  challenge  we  gave  candidates,  and  evaluation  criteria  we  used,  please  see  the  appendix.      
    •  Chapter  3.  The  Interview  Process    Getting  hired  to  be  Next  Big  Sound’s  Resident  Data  Journalist    From  the  moment  I  spotted  the  opening  at  Next  Big  Sound  for  a  music  data  journalist,  I  was  intrigued.  At  first  I  wondered  what  exactly  a  music  data  journalist  does,  then  decided  it  was  most  certainly  something  I  would  like  to  find  out.  I  had  heard  about  Next  Big  Sound  through  working  as  an  assignment  editor  on  a  book  entitled  The  Human  Face  of  Big  Data,  and  the  name  came  up  in  almost  every  pitch  meeting  with  everyone  excited  about  what  the  boys  in  Boulder  were  doing  with  music.      The  application  process  for  the  data  journalist  position  started  with  a  simple  resume  submission.  Fortunately,  it  seemed  my  experience,  education  and  interests  up  to  this  point  suited  what  they  were  looking  for  in  order  to  fill  this  very  new  role.  My  parents  have  sat  through  endless  hours  of  screechy  violin  recitals  since  childhood  (thankfully  I  am  told  they  got  less  screechy  with  time),  I  ran  a  radio  show  in  college,  and  after  completing  my  masters  in  journalism  at  NYU  a  few  months  earlier,  I  had  started  working  on  a  project  revolving  around  Big  Data.  Not  long  after  submitting  my  resume,  I  received  an  email  from  Alex  White,  CEO  and  co-­‐founder  of  Next  Big  Sound,  asking  me  to  please  submit  a  pitch  for  what  type  of  story  I  would  write.  Those  invited  to  pitch  were  free  to  come  up  with  whatever  idea  they  saw  fit,  but  the  proposed  article  would  have  to  fall  within  one  of  five  categories.  Applying  data  to  prove  or  disprove  a  theory  on  a  current  music  industry  topic,  providing  data-­‐related  insights  into  a  topical  news  item,  analyzing  the  impact  of  a  newsworthy  event  on  a  given  artist  or  artists,  identifying  trends  in  NBS  data  and  surface  lessons  that  can  be  applied  industry-­‐wide,  and  last  but  not  least  –  case  studies.    The  idea  I  came  up  with  focused  on  the  upcoming  Coachella  Music  and  Arts  Festival  in  California.  I  wondered  whether  it  would  be  possible  to  determine  who  was  making  the  
    •  biggest  splash  after  performing  -­‐  the  industry  veterans  like  Radiohead,  newcomers  like  Azealia  Banks,  or  the  reunion  acts  that  the  festival  is  well-­‐known  for  bringing  together,  such  as  Pulp.  If  they  liked  my  pitch,  I  would  be  asked  to  write  the  story,  and  whether  it  was  published  or  not,  receive  $250  in  compensation  as  well  as  lifetime  access  to  the  Next  Big  Sound  platform.    Not  bad  if  you  ask  me  –  I  would  have  done  it  for  free.  However,  the  idea  of  being  compensated  for  my  ideas  and  work,  which  is  not  a  typical  phenomenon  in  interview  processes,  is  something  that  stuck  out  in  my  mind  as  a  sign  of  appreciation  and  highly  motivational,  and  also  was  my  first  clue  to  the  management  style  of  this  company:  happy  employees  are  happy  to  go  that  extra  mile  for  you.    So,  after  biting  my  nails  for  a  few  days,  I  was  elated  to  receive  an  email  saying  I  had  made  it  to  the  next  round  and  that  the  deadline  would  be  in  two  days.  The  piece  was  to  be  no  more  than  750  words,  and  if  it  was  not  chosen  I  would  be  free  to  shop  it  for  publication  elsewhere.  With  access  to  the  Next  Big  Sound  data,  I  set  about  putting  together  an  article  on  my  pitch.  While  I  had  to  fiddle  around  a  bit  before  knowing  exactly  how  to  use  it,  I  found  the  platform  easy  to  understand  and  quickly  started  to  gather  the  information  I  would  need  in  order  to  compare  these  categories  of  performers.  I  delivered  the  piece  before  deadline  and  set  about  anxiously  waiting  to  hear.    The  next  day,  I  received  an  email  from  Alex,  asking  me  to  meet  with  him  for  an  interview  the  following  week.  We  met  and  had  a  45-­‐minute  conversation  about  my  article,  previous  work,  what  I  thought  the  position  would  and  should  entail,  as  well  as  what  his  vision  was  for  the  role  of  a  data  journalist  with  Next  Big  Sound.  Following  our  chat,  I  was  introduced  to  Yu-­‐Ting  Lin,  the  VP  of  Finance  and  Operations,  and  launched  into  what  would  be  the  most  intense  interview  I  have  ever  participated  in.  We  spoke  for  close  to  two  hours  in  a  very  casual  manner,  about  anything  but  the  standard,  dull  interview  topics,  and  I  found  myself  sharing  more-­‐than-­‐a-­‐lot  about  who  I  am.    
    •  As  I  was  leaving  the  office  that  day,  it  occurred  to  me  that  this  was  an  extremely  clever  way  to  vet  future  employees.  I  have  often  discussed  with  my  peers  the  lack  of  value  there  is  in  the  standard  interview.  Asking  age-­‐old  questions  and  receiving  practiced  responses  in  return,  gives  you  very  little  insight  into  the  true  personality  and  motivation  of  the  candidate  you  are  considering  for  hire.    A  few  days  later,  I  was  asked  to  submit  my  references  and  Alex  and  I  scheduled  a  follow-­‐up  call.  In  this  conversation,  he  explained  that  because  we  would  be  entering  unchartered  territory,  a  large  part  of  my  role  as  a  data  journalist  would  be  to  analyze  my  progress,  see  what  works  and  what  doesn’t,  and  from  there  determine  what  the  next  step  should  be.  In  that  vein,  he  asked  me  to  analyze  the  interview  process  itself.  I  gave  him  my  thoughts  on  the  process,  and  added  that  I  felt  it  might  have  been  helpful  for  them  to  pose  a  question  about  the  data  to  candidates  that  had  a  pre-­‐determined  answer,  in  order  to  truly  test  their  comprehension.  I  was  very  excited  to  receive  a  phone  call  to  let  me  know  that  I  had  been  chosen  for  the  position.  Given  the  timing  of  the  hire,  in  the  midst  of  the  company  move  to  New  York,  it  would  it  take  almost  a  month  for  me  to  start  work.  After  receiving  an  onboarding  document,  with  ideas  for  what  I  could  expect  in  the  first  few  months  on  the  job,  I  took  advantage  of  that  time  to  start  building  my  editorial  calendar.  I  was  also  happy  to  have  the  chance  to  fly  out  to  Boulder,  to  see  where  it  all  began,  while  Alex  packed  up  the  last  of  the  monitors  and  shipped  them  to  New  York.  And  once  we  got  to  the  office  on  June  1st,  I  hit  the  ground  running.              
    •  Chapter  4.    What  is  a  Data  Journalist?  Getting  Started    What?  I’ve  been  here  a  month  already?  This  afternoon  marks  the  end  of  my  first  30  days  with  Next  Big  Sound,  and  while  figuring  out  exactly  what  my  role  is  here  will  be  an  on-­‐going  process  for  some  time,  a  lot  has  already  happened.      All  newly  hired  engineers  at  Next  Big  Sound  are  asked  to  push  out  code  on  their  very  first  day  at  work.  This,  as  Alex  explained  to  me,  helps  them  get  over  the  fear  of  that  initial  step  and  jump  right  into  the  fray.  The  data  journalist  equivalent  of  this  would  be  to  produce  a  post  for  the  blog  on  my  first  day  on  the  job.  At  first  this  seemed  like  a  tall  order,  but  I  quickly  narrowed  down  my  ideas  and  got  started.      Writing  a  piece  and  publishing  it  on  day  one,  while  somewhat  nerve-­‐wracking,  was  a  great  way  to  grab  hold  of  the  blog,  gain  confidence  in  my  abilities  to  do  this  job,  and  know  that  I  was  able  to  create  strong  narrative  content  based  on  the  wealth  of  data  we  have  at  our  fingertips.  The  opportunities  for  the  type  of  questions  I  can  pose,  the  articles  I  can  write  and  for  what  I  can  learn  about  the  music  industry  are  seemingly  endless.      Alex  and  I  sat  down  together  and  decided  that  for  now,  two  blog  posts  a  week  would  be  a  good  amount  to  publish.  In  an  effort  to  keep  it  consistent  for  our  readers,  I  regularly  post  these  on  Tuesdays  and  Thursdays.  Because  the  blog  has  not  been  regularly  maintained  before  I  came  onboard,  what  type  of  content  will  be  the  most  successful  and  interesting  to  our  customers  is  still  something  that  we  are  figuring  out,  and  the  best  way  to  do  that  is  by  trying  and  failing.  So  far  I  have  written  about  emerging  bands,  music  trends  from  the  data  perspective,  bands  that  are  successful  in  implementing  various  strategies  be  it  crowd-­‐sourcing  funds  for  touring  or  social  network  tactics,  what  genres  are  most  popular  at  festivals,  and  more.      
    •  Alex  and  I  meet  on  a  weekly  basis  and  discuss  our  progress,  which  I  keep  track  of  in  an  Excel  file.  Monday  mornings  I  pull  a  community  report  with  key  metrics  on  Next  Big  Sound  from  our  Premier  platform,  and  in  addition  keep  track  of  our  Tumblr  followers,  which  blog  posts  I  have  written  in  the  past  week,  as  well  as  any  coverage  there  has  been  of  Next  Big  Sound  in  the  press.  We  look  at  any  spikes  or  declines  in  our  numbers  and  discuss  what  may  or  may  not  be  the  cause  of  them,  attempt  to  analyze  which  type  of  posts  are  doing  the  best,  and  plan  for  the  coming  week.    Another  aspect  of  the  position  is  an  editorial  contact  list  I  am  putting  together.  This  is  a  list  of  editors  and  journalists  at  various  publications,  who  I  will  reach  out  to  and  establish  relationships  with.  The  purpose  of  these  relationships  is  to  have  an  outlet  to  which  I  can  supply  with  our  data  and  trends  that  we  spot,  in  return  for  coverage  of  Next  Big  Sound.  Each  article  that  mentions  our  data  as  a  valuable  source  of  information  helps  build  our  reputation  as  a  company  that  is  integral  to  the  future  of  the  music  industry.      Set  for  release  in  early  September  is  the  re-­‐launch  of  our  platform.  As  part  of  this,  I  have  been  working  with  our  lead  designer  Andrew  Cohen,  and  head  of  product  and  co-­‐founder  David  Hoffman,  on  the  redesign  of  the  Next  Big  Sound  blog.  We  have  put  together  a  page  that  resembles  more  of  magazine  layout  with  content  divided  into  sections,  a  heavy  focus  on  images,  includes  an  NBS  Top  15  playlist,  and  most  importantly  will  allow  us  present  the  type  of  content  we  are  able  to  create  in  a  more  professional  manner.      In  addition  to  this,  I  handle  our  social  media  accounts,  from  Twitter  to  Facebook,  to  Google  Plus.  I  regularly  update  these  with  a  variety  of  content,  ranging  from  interesting  graphs  I  find  with  our  platform,  links  to  artists  that  are  displaying  surprising  developments,  engaging  questions  for  our  audience  and  more.  Again,  figuring  out  what  are  the  most  successful  posts  is  an  ongoing  process,  which  I  track  through  the  available  analytics.    
    •  In  order  to  create  the  most  compelling  content  possible,  it  is  essential  that  I  spend  a  good  amount  of  hours  each  week  trolling  both  physical  and  digital  magazines  for  industry  developments.  I  keep  up  to  date  on  not  only  music  publications  such  as  Rolling  Stone,  Billboard  Magazine,  Pitchfork  and  Spin,  but  also  more  tech-­‐oriented  outlets  such  as  Gizmodo,  TechCrunch  and  Digital  Music  News.  I  cannot  maintain  a  blog  without  employing  a  voice  of  authority.      As  the  second  month  begins,  I  am  beginning  to  understand  that  the  position  of  data  journalist  is  comprehensive.  It  will  require  me  to  not  only  be  on  the  ball  in  terms  of  breaking  stories,  but  also  to  maintain  a  long-­‐term  perspective  on  developing  the  outward  face  of  this  company.  By  keeping  careful  track  of  my  progress  and  carefully  scheduling  my  workdays,  I  am  able  to  manage  these  responsibilities.                                      
    •  Chapter  5.  Learning  the  History  of  Data  Journalism:  The  First  Quarter    Three  months  in,  and  it  is  hard  to  imagine  where  all  that  time  went,  how  little  I  have  slept,  and  just  how  much  I  have  learned.  Summer  being  one  of  the  busiest  seasons  in  the  industry,  with  festivals  staged  almost  every  weekend,  outdoor  concerts  by  the  bushel,  tours  across  the  country  and  story  ideas  for  a  new  data  journalist  popping  up  every  minute.      Since  taking  on  the  role  as  resident  data  journalist,  I  have  been  fielding  a  lot  of  questions  about  what  exactly  this  means.  The  concept  of  including  this  type  of  information  as  a  basis  for  articles  is  anything  but  new,  a  widely  cited  example  is  the  use  of  educational  data  for  an  article  in  the  very  first  issue  of  the  Guardian  in  1821.  What  has  revolutionized  this  field  in  recent  years  is  the  amount  of  data  available,  and  the  speed  with  which  this  data  is  generated  and  delivered.  At  Next  Big  Sound  we  are  gathering  an  average  of  175  million  data  points  each  day.        There  are  several  great  examples  of  journalists  who  use  data  heavily  in  their  work.  Some  of  the  best  stories  to  hit  the  press  this  past  year  are  articles  based  on  data  findings,  such  as  the  investigative  series  on  horse  racing  in  the  New  York  Times  entitled  Death  and  Disarray  at  America’s  Racetracks.  Data  journalism  can  also  come  in  different  formats,  for  instance,  the  News  Application  team  at  the  Chicago  Tribune  consists  of  a  group  of  programmers  embedded  in  the  newsroom,  assisting  journalists  in  uncovering  data  and  creating  visualizations.  The  magnitude  of  information  now  being  gathered  and  stored  within  most  fields,  from  healthcare  to  consumer  behavior  to  the  various  social  sciences,  serves  as  an  invaluable  resource  to  those  writing  the  news.    At  this  point,  I  am  only  just  beginning  to  comprehend  the  endless  opportunities  for  what  kind  of  stories  I  can  write  based  on  this  massive  amount  of  data,  and  just  how  important  it  is  to  fuse  this  type  of  information  into  an  industry  that  can  be  reluctant  to  the  idea  of  
    •  change,  but  is  rapidly  changing  nonetheless.  I  feel  more  in  the  loop  when  it  comes  to  the  industry,  understand  the  ins-­‐and-­‐outs  of  our  platform,  and  am  able  to  quickly  determine  what  stories  our  audience  will  respond  to  and  how.      At  Next  Big  Sound,  I  have  at  my  fingertips  a  platform  that  allows  me  to  easily  graph  information  in  order  to  see  correlations,  as  well  as  the  ability  to  pull  overview  reports  of  relevant  data.  Telling  great  stories  then  simply  becomes  a  matter  of  figuring  out  the  right  questions  to  ask  of  the  data  and  combining  this  with  relevant  reported  content.  Working  as  an  embedded  data  journalist  with  a  company  can  of  course  be  challenging  without  an  editorial  team  around  me  to  bounce  off  ideas.  However,  I  often  use  my  colleagues  as  a  sounding  board  and  given  all  the  stories  the  data  has  to  tell,  have  yet  to  come  up  empty-­‐handed  when  deadlines  roll  around.      Another  aspect  of  the  position  that  has  risen  in  importance  in  the  past  few  months  has  been  ensuring  the  distribution  of  our  content,  through  more  than  one  channel.  I  find  myself  being  interviewed  about  this  new  type  of  role,  speaking  on  panels  about  the  future  of  the  industry,  building  individual  relationships  with  editors  and  journalists  that  are  interested  in  applying  new  data  to  the  questions  they  are  posing.  In  addition  to  this  I  am  now  working  with  several  online  publications  to  further  syndicate  the  content  of  our  blog,  among  them  the  MTV  O  Music  Awards  blog,  Sidewinder.fm,  Hypebot  and  others.  As  we  continue  to  grow,  I  plan  to  cultivate  more  and  more  of  these  relationships  in  order  to  ensure  that  our  content  and  mindshare  around  the  data  we  have  available  at  Next  Big  Sound  is  widespread  and  becomes  part  of  the  daily  conversation  in  the  music  industry.      From  time  to  time,  I  will  describe  my  job  as  basically  “de-­‐nerdifying”  Next  Big  Sound.  Working  on  such  a  technical  level,  it  can  be  a  challenge  for  colleagues  to  communicate  in  a  simple  terms  what  they  are  doing.  Here  is  where  my  listening,  comprehension  and  communication  skills  come  in  handy.  I  take  the  complicated  data  science  projects  that  
    •  they  are  working  on,  such  as  how  the  concept  Granger  Causality  can  be  used  to  calculate  the  causation  between  social  media  metrics  and  record  sales,  and  explain  the  significance  of  this  to  an  industry  that  can  be  hesitant  of  using  data.                                                    
    •  Chapter  6.  Taking  it  a  Step  Further:  Key  Skills  for  a  Data  Journalist    As  I  am  nearing  my  first  six  months  with  Next  Big  Sound,  I  have  learned  a  great  deal  more  about  the  basic  skills  that  will  help  me  do  my  job  better,  in  terms  of  dealing  with  the  process  and  presentation  of  data.        Presentation  When  you  are  presenting  data  in  graphical  form,  there  are  several  considerations  you  must  make.  Understanding  the  numbers  is  of  course  imperative,  but  presenting  the  numbers  in  a  manner  your  audience  will  easily  comprehend  is  the  most  pressing  challenge.  The  advantage  of  working  for  Next  Big  Sound  is  that  I  very  rarely  have  to  think  about  how  to  present  the  data;  it  is  easily  done  for  me  through  a  platform  that  is  already  carefully  crafted  and  considered.  But  for  the  typical  data  journalist,  knowing  how  to  present  statistical  information  in  a  way  that  intrigues  and  involves  the  reader  can  be  a  challenge.  Taking  care  to  not  obfuscate  the  data,  and  creating  charts  that  are  easily  readable.      One  of  the  greatest  resources  I  found  in  learning  how  to  deal  with  data  was  the  Wall  Street  Journal  Guide  to  Information  Graphics,  written  by  Dona  M.  Wong.  This  book  gives  you  a  comprehensive  insight  into  the  basics  of  presenting  statistical  information,  and  the  dos  and  don’ts  of  charting  data.  Extremely  useful,  this  guide  is  an  overview  of  key  rules  that  will  help  any  data  journalist  understand  how  to  present  data  in  a  manner  that  is  not  only  valuable,  but  also  completely  accurate.    I  don’t  for  a  minute  wish  to  imply  that  I  now  know  everything  about  graphical  design  or  charts,  but  I  have  learned  the  basics  of  how  to  create  a  basic  visual  representation  of  data  from  this  book,  and  believe  it  to  be  integral  to  explaining  this  phenomenon  we  call  Big  Data.      
    •  Learning  to  query  with  R  Another  step  in  becoming  integrated  into  this  company,  was  realizing  I  knew  next  to  nothing  about  how  to  deal  with  information  stored  in  a  database.  A  database  is  a  central  collection  of  information,  organized  in  tables,  which  when  relevant  and  utilized  in  the  correct  manner,  will  be  a  source  of  answers,  to  any  question  you  might  have.    Working  with  a  team  of  engineers,  data  scientists,  and  designers  who  understood  programming  like  the  back  of  their  hand,  it  became  imminently  obvious  to  me  that  the  ability  to  extract  information  from  whatever  database  I  had  at  hand,  whether  it  that  of  that  Next  Big  Sound,  or  any  other,  was  integral  to  independently  mastering  this  role.      In  this  vein  I  decided  to  delve  into  learning  how  to  query.  Now,  the  differences  in  programming  language  can  be  somewhat  complicated  for  those  of  us  who  aren’t  engineers.  There  are  several  ways  in  which  you  can  interact  with  a  database,  whether  it  be  languages  such  as  Java,  Python,  R,  or  whatever  else  these  guys  (who  are  definitely  smarter  than  me)  come  up  with.  But  a  basic  requirement,  I  believe,  for  a  data  journalist,  is  to  be  able  to  extract  the  relevant  information  you  need  for  a  specific  story  from  it.      The  initial  step  is  to  learn  Sequence  Query  Language  (SQL),  a  standard  vernacular  for  computer  programming  which  allows  you  pull  information  from  a  database.  For  instance,  if  you  would  like  to  get  a  list  of  all  artists  whose  name  starts  with  the  letter  B,  or  who  have  between  5000  and  50,000  fans  on  Facebook  from  the  Next  Big  Sound  database,  you  would  need  to  know  the  basic  commands  of  SQL,  such  as  SELECT,  AND/OR  etc.  There  are  several  free  online  resources  where  you  can  learn  the  basics.      Taking  this  a  step  further,  you  might  like  to  narrow  down  this  query  to  a  more  specific  question,  such  as,  how  many  of  these  artists  gained  a  certain  amount  of  followers,  within  a  certain  time  period,  and  how  rapidly  did  that  growth  occur.    Our  data  scientists  rely  heavily  on  R,  which  is  the  language  I  am  in  the  process  of  learning.  Using  this  I  can  
    •  ask  more  complicated  questions  of  the  data,  take  a  stab  at  various  graph  formats  in  order  to  see  what  might  work  best,  and  eliminate  data  that  for  various  reasons  might  not  be  relevant.  With  the  ability  to  query,  the  opportunities  for  what  you  can  learn  from  a  collection  of  numbers  starts  to  become  not  only  unimaginable,  but  also  overwhelming.  Over  the  coming  months,  I  will  continue  to  study  the  various  programming  languages,  in  hopes  of  eventually  mastering  them.      As  data  journalists,  we  are  opening  a  whole  new  world.  In  terms  of  what  we  can  do,  what  we  can  learn,  and  what  we  can  explain  to  our  audience.  And  as  this  world  of  data  grows  larger,  faster  and  ever  more  unmanageable,  it  is  our  job  to  understand,  even  though  that  means  stepping  outside  our  comfort  zone  of  writing,  recording  and  editing  information.  You  may  never  have  thought  that  as  a  journalist  that  you  would  have  to  learn  how  to  code,  but  now  that  is  becoming  a  basic  requirement  of  telling  the  narrative  of  Big  Data.                            
    •  Appendix  1    Actual  NBS  Data  Journalist  Job  Description  Good  References  to  Study  Interview  Timeline  Pitch  Challenge  Interview  Process  Pitch  Evaluation  Criteria  First  Month  Music  Data  Journalist  Goals    Job  Description    (Note  how  NBS  still  asked  for  business  analyst)  We  are  a  two-­‐year-­‐old,  venture  backed,  tech  startup  focused  on  measuring  the  music  industry,  both  online  and  off.    We  collect  engagement  metrics  from  all  the  largest  social  media  sites  on  a  daily  basis,  we  catalogue  events  like  releases  and  concerts,  and  we  import  historical  archives  of  radio  and  sales  data  from  our  major  customers.      We  are  looking  for  a  data  journalist/business  analyst  to  join  our  growing  team  of  highly  competent  engineers,  designers,  salesmen  and  product  developers.    Ideal  skills  in  order  of  importance:    Storytelling:  able  to  extract  data  and  produce  insightful  narrative.  Analytical:  comfortable  in  Excel  and  able  to  proof  underlying  math  and  statistics  before  releasing  to  customers.  Design  sense:  able  to  take  findings  and  compile  professional  looking  blog  posts,  presentation  decks,  and  pdfs.  Music  industry  knowledge:  experience  in  the  music  industry  to  help  inform  reports  that  would  be  interesting  to  our  customers.    Main  responsibilities:  • Create  constant  stream  of  content  and  analysis  by  writing  timely  articles,  industry-­‐wide  macro  reports,  event  response  measurement  (Grammys  etc.)  • Create  compelling  examples  for  marketing  collateral,  key  live  conference  presentations,  and  sales  pitches  • Field  ad  hoc  request  from  major  users  and  individuals  in  support  of  NBS  account  managers  • Build  case  studies  and  best  practices  • Background:  • Journalism  background  (degree  or  newsroom  experience)  
    •  • Passion  for  music  and  the  music  industry  • Bonus:  working  SQL  or  programming  knowledge    Good  References  to  Study    http://contently.com/blog/    http://blog.okcupid.com    http://blog.redfin.com    http://blog.runkeeper.com/    http://37signals.com/svn/    http://blog.birchbox.com/    http://www.seomoz.org/blog    http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/    http://blog.uber.com/      Interview  Timeline  Week  1:  - Post  Job  description  posted  for  Data  Journalist  Week  5:  -­‐                    Narrow  down  resumes  to  the  best  10-­‐20  -­‐                    Finalize  first-­‐cut  names  -­‐                    Send  first-­‐cut  candidates  a  Pitch  Challenge  due  in  48  hours.  Candidates  should  submit  a  pitch  consisting  of:  -­‐  Summary  of  a  story  idea  they’d  write  today  (based  on  topical  news  and/or  trends  observed  in  your  data)  no  longer  than  750  words  -­‐  Why  that  story  idea  should  be  considered  -­‐  Target  audience  and  desired  audience  takeaway  (Note:  in  pitch  challenge,  communicate  when  selected  pitches  will  be  notified)    Week  6:  -­‐                    Narrow  pitches  down  to  the  best  5  
    •  -­‐                    Notify  the  selected  pitches  to  write  their  stories  in  48  hours  Week  7-­‐8:  - Finalize  the  best  three  candidates  and  conduct  in-­‐person  interviews  Week  9:  - Send  offer  letter  to  the  best  candidate    Pitch  Challenge  from  Interview  Process  (template)  Thank  you  for  your  interest  in  the  Data  Journalist  position  here  at  <Your  Company  Name>.  We’re  pleased  to  inform  you  that  you’ve  made  the  “first  cut”  of  applicants,  but  we  want  to  get  to  know  you  a  bit  better  before  moving  to  the  next  stage.    We’d  like  you  to  pitch  us  on  a  story  idea  for  the  type  of  piece  you  would  write  if  this  was  your  job.  What  we’re  looking  for  here  is  your  ability  to  identify  compelling  story  ideas  and  angles  that  would  catch  the  eye  of  industry  executives  and  the  press.  Pitches  can  run  the  gamut  from:    -­‐ Applying  data  to  prove/disprove  a  theory  on  a  current  industry  debate  -­‐ Provide  data-­‐related  insights  into  a  topical  news  item  -­‐ Analyze  the  impact  of  a  newsworthy  event    -­‐ Identify  trends  in  our  data  and  surface  lessons  that  can  be  applied  industry-­‐wide  -­‐ Case  studies    We  will  be  making  our  second  cut  based  on  the  strength  of  these  pitches,  so  make  ‘em  count.  Pitches  will  be  due  by  close  of  business  <date>.      Pitch  Evaluation  Criteria  __  Identifies  a  timely,  relevant  topic    __  Applies  data  properly  and  relevantly  __  Demonstrates  understanding  of  your  business  /  industry  __  Demonstrates  understanding  of  data  analytics    __  Demonstrates  an  understanding  of  news  hooks/angles  __  Demonstrates  creative,  critical,  and  out-­‐of-­‐the-­‐box  thinking  
    •  __  Can  be  communicated  in  different  formats  (story,  chart,  infographic,  etc.)  __  Properly  showcases  your  company  as  a  thought  leader/resource  __  Creates  interest  and  excitement  in  the  reader    First  Month  Goals  A.  Create  Editorial  Calendar:  a  list  of  high-­‐profile  events  that  you’ll  want  commentary/data  on,  notable  anniversaries,  conferences,  etc.  Develop  story  angles  on  all  in  advance  and  begin  doing  research.  B.  Metrics:  establish  baseline  metrics  of  blog  views,  chart  subscribers,  Twitter  followers,  Facebook  page  likes,  Tumblr,  using  your  product  itself  if  possible.    C.  Press  Relations:  create  a  list  of  press  outlets  you  want  to  reach  with  stories/updates.      Appendix  2  Resources  for  a  Data  Journalist  • Free  online  database  query  tutorial:  http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_intro.asp  • Free  basic  training  in  several  different  coding  languages  including  JavaScript  and  Python:  http://www.codecademy.com/  • Data  Journalism  Handbook  download  from  O’Reilly  Media:  http://datajournalismhandbook.org/1.0/en/index.html  • Data  Source  Handbook:  A  Guide  To  Public  Data.  Pete  Warden:  http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018254.do  • Free  visualization  software:  Google  Fusion  Tables  (maps),  Dipity  (timelines),  Tableau  Public  (interactive),  Many  Eyes  (charts,  graphs,  word  clouds,  etc.),  Gephi  (network  graphs)  • The  Wall  Street  Journal:  Guide  to  Information  Graphics.  Dona  M.  Wong