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Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD,  Govt. Of India
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Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD, Govt. Of India

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Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD, Govt. Of India

Distance & Regular Education,All University Approved & Recognized By UGC/DEC/AICTE/BCI/ MHRD, Govt. Of India

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  • 1. Distance & Regular Education Monday, 5 August 2013 Distance Education Council How Distance Education Works Distance education classes at IASAM ACADEMY have both regular and distance format. Some courses also include a weekend of intensive on-campus lectures. courses span a full semester and have scheduled assignments and exams. But the formats differ in presentation and technical requirements. IASAM ACADEMY Distance education, distance learning, dlearning or D-Learning is a mode of delivering education and instruction, often on an individual basis, to students who are not physically present in a traditional setting such as a classroom. Distance learning provides "access to learning when the source of information and the learners are separated by time and distance, or both." Distance education courses that require a physical on-site presence for any reason (including taking examinations) have been referred to as hybrid or blended courses of study. Massive open online courses(MOOC), aimed at large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web or other network technologies, are a recent development in distance education.
  • 2. History and development Distance education dates back to at least as early as 1728 when an advertisement in the Boston Gazette promoted "Caleb Phillips, Teacher of the new method of Short Hand," who sought students who wanted to learn through weekly mailed lessons. Similarly, Isaac Pitman taught shorthand in Great Britain via correspondence in the 1840s. Distance education has a long history, but its popularity and use has grown exponentially as more advanced technology has become available. By 2008, online learning programs were available in the [[United States]] in 44 states at the K-12 level. Correspondence courses from universities The University of London was the first university to offer distance learning degrees, establishing its External Programme in 1858. This program is now known as the University of London International Programmes and includes Postgraduate, Undergraduate and Diploma degrees created by colleges such as the London School of Economics, Royal Holloway and Goldsmiths. In the United States William Rainey Harper, first president of the University of Chicago, developed the concept of extended education, whereby the research university had satellite colleges of education in the wider community. In 1892 he also encouraged the concept of correspondence school courses to further promote education, an idea that was put into practice by Columbia University. Enrollment in the largest private for-profit school based in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the International Correspondence Schools grew explosively in the 1890s. Originally founded in 1888 to provide training for immigrant coal miners aiming to become state mine inspectors or foremen, it enrolled 2500 new students in 1894 and matriculated 72,000 new students in 1895. By 1906 total enrollments reached 900,000. The growth was due to sending out complete textbooks instead of single lessons, and the use of 1200 aggressive in-person salesmen. By 1916 it was spending $2 million a year on magazine advertising.The dropout rates were high; only one in six made it past the first third of the material in a course. Only 2.6% of students who began a course finished it. The students dropped out because they underestimated the difficulty, had little encouragement, and had poor study habits. There was a stark contrast in pedagogy:
  • 3. UGC,DEC,AICTE,BCI distance education "The regular technical school or college aims to educate a man broadly; our aim, on the contrary, is to educate him only along some particular line. The college demands that a student shall have certain educational qualifications to enter it, and that all students study for approximately the same length of time, and when they have finished their courses they are supposed to be qualified to enter any one of a number of branches in some particular profession. We, on the contrary, are aiming to make our courses fit the particular needs of the student who takes them." Education was a high priority in the Progressive Era, as American high schools and colleges expanded greatly. For men who were older or were too busy with family responsibilities, night schools were opened, such as the YMCA school in Boston that became Northeastern University. Outside the big cities, private correspondence schools offered a flexible, narrowly focused solution. In 1916 efficiency was enhanced by the formation of the National Association of Corporation Schools. Universities around the world used correspondence courses in the first half of the 20th century, especially to reach rural students. Australia with its vast distances was especially active; the University of Queensland established its Department of Correspondence Studies in 1911. The International Conference for Correspondence Education held its first meeting in 1938. The goal was to provide individualized education for students, at low cost, by using a pedagogy of testing, recording, classification, and differentiation. Radio and television
  • 4. The very rapid spread of radio in the United States in the 1930s led to proposals to use it for distance education. By 1938, at least 200 city school systems, 25 state boards of education, and many colleges and universities broadcast educational programs for the public schools. One line of thought was to use radio as a master teacher. " Experts in given fields broadcast lessons for pupils within the many schoolrooms of the public school system, asking questions, suggesting readings, making assignments, and conducting tests. This mechanizes education and leaves the local teacher only the tasks of preparing for the broadcast and keeping order in the classroom." A typical setup came in Kentucky in 1948 when John Wilkinson Taylor, president of the University of Louisville, teamed up with the National Broadcasting Corporation to use radio as a medium for distance education, The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission endorsed the project and predicted that the "college-by-radio" would put "American education 25 years ahead." The University was owned by the city, and local residents would pay the low tuition rates, receive their study materials in the mail, and listen by radio to live classroom discussions that were held on campus. Charles Wedemeyer of the University of Wisconsin–Madison also promoted new methods. From 1964 to 1968, the Carnegie Foundation funded Wedemeyer's Articulated Instructional Media Project (AIM) which brought in a variety of communications technologies aimed at providing learning to an off-campus population. According to Moore's recounting, AIM impressed the UK which imported these ideas when establishing in 1969 The Open University, which initially relied on radio and television broadcasts for much of its delivery.Athabasca University, Canada's Open University, was created in 1970 and followed a similar, though independently developed, pattern. The Open University inspired the creation of Spain's National University of Distance Education (1972) and Germany's FernUniversität in Hagen (1974). There are now many similar institutions around the world, often with the name "Open University" (in English or in the local language). All "open universities" use distance education technologies as delivery methodologies and some have grown to become 'mega-universities', a term coined to denote institutions with more than 100,000 students. In 1976, Bernard Luskin launched Coastline Community College as a college beyond walls, combining computer assisted instruction with telecourses proceed by KOCE TV, the Coast Community College District public television station. Coastline has been a landmark strategic success in helping to establish online distance learning using modern technology for learning. IASAM ACADEMY
  • 5. Internet Main article: Virtual education The widespread use of computers and the internet have made distance learning easier and faster, and today virtual schools and virtual universities deliver full curricula online.[26] In 1996 Jones International University was launched and claims to be the first fully online university accredited by a regional accrediting association in the US.[27] Between 2000 and 2008, undergraduate enrollment in at least some distance programs became more and more common. The share of students "in at least one distance education class expanded from 8 percent to 20 percent, and the percentage enrolled in a distance education degree program increased from 2 percent to 4 percent."[28] Many private, public, non-profit and for-profit institutions worldwide now offer distance education courses from the most basic instruction through the highest levels of degree and doctoral programs. Levels of accreditation vary: Widely respected universities such as Stanford University and Harvard now deliver online courses—but other online schools receive little outside oversight, and some are actually fraudulent, i.e., diploma mills. In the US, the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC) specializes in the accreditation of distance education institutions. In the United States in 2011, it was found that a third of all the students enrolled in postsecondary education had taken an accredited online course in a postsecondary institution. Even though growth rates are slow, enrollment for online courses has been seen to increase with the advance in technology. The majority of public and private colleges now offer full academic programs online.[30] These include, but are not limited to, training programs in the mental health,[31] occupational therapy,[32][33] family therapy,[34] art therapy,[35] physical therapy,[33] and rehabilitation counseling[36] fields. Technologies Although the expansion of the Internet blurs the boundaries, distance education technologies are divided into two modes of delivery: synchronous learning and asynchronous learning. In synchronous learning, all participants are "present" at the same time. In this regard, it resembles traditional classroom teaching methods despite the participants being located remotely. It requires a timetable to be organized. Web conferencing, videoconferencing, educational television, instructional television are examples of synchronous technology, as are direct-broadcast satellite (DBS), internet radio, live streaming, telephone, and web-based VoIP.[37] Online meeting software such as Adobe Connect has helped to facilitate meetings in distance learning courses. In asynchronous learning, participants access course materials flexibly on their own schedules. Students are not required to be together at the same time. Mail correspondence, which is the oldest form of distance education, is an asynchronous delivery technology, as are message board forums, e-mail, video and audio recordings, print materials, voicemail and fax.[37] The two methods can be combined. Many courses offered by The Open University use periodic sessions of residential or day teaching to supplement the remote teaching.[38] The Open University uses a blend of technologies and a blend of learning modalities (face-to-face, distance and hybrid) all under the rubric of "distance learning."
  • 6. Distance learning can also use interactive radio instruction (IRI), interactive audio instruction (IAI), online virtual worlds, digital games, webinars, and webcasts.[38] Distance e-Learning For Distance e-Learning in the Philippine setting, see Distance e-Learning (Philippines). Distance e-Learning, or DeL, is a form of distance education that uses synchronous and asynchronous online communication in an interactive learning environment to bridge the gap in temporal or spatial constraints. Distance e-Learning is different from mainstream distance education because of the former's interactive nature and the latter's traditional focus on content delivery and independent learning. Distance e-Learning goes beyond the use of information and communications technology as a tool to access information; "the focus is shifted to the education transaction in the form of virtual community of learners sustainable across time."[39] Online learning has its roots in computer conferencing and collaborative constructivist approach to learning.[39] Benefits Distance learning can expand access to education and training for both general populace and businesses since its flexible scheduling structure lessens the effects of the many time-constraints imposed by personal responsibilities and commitments.[40] Devolving some activities off-site alleviates institutional capacity constraints arising from the traditional demand on institutional buildings and infrastructure.[40] Furthermore, there is the potential for increased access to more experts in the field and to other students from diverse geographical, social, cultural, economic, and experiential backgrounds.[34] As the population at large becomes more involved in lifelong learning beyond the normal schooling age, institutions can benefit financially, and adult learning business courses may be particularly lucrative.[40] Distance education programs can act as a catalyst for institutional innovation[40] and are at least as effective as face-to-face learning programs,[32][41] especially if the instructor is knowledgeable and skilled.[35] Distance education can also provide a broader method of communication within the realm of education. With the many tools and programs that technological advancements have to offer, communication appears to increase in distance education amongst students and their professors, as well as students and their classmates. The distance educational increase in communication, particularly communication amongst students and their classmates, is an improvement that has been made to provide distance education students with as many of the opportunities as possible as they would receive in in-person education. The improvement being made in distance education is growing in tandem with the constant technological advancements. Present-day online communication allows students to associate with accredited schools and programs throughout the world that are out of reach for in-person learning. By having the opportunity to be involved in global institutions via distance education, a diverse array of thought is presented to students through communication with their classmates. This is beneficial because students have the opportunity to "combine new opinions with their own, and develop a solid foundation for learning.".[42] It has been shown through research that "as learners become aware of the variations in interpretation and construction of meaning among a range of people [they] construct an individual meaning," which can help students become knowledable of a wide array of
  • 7. viewpoints in education.[42] To increase the likelihood that students will build effective ties with one another during the course, instructors should use similar assignments for students across different locations to overcome the influence of co-location on relationship building.[43] The high cost of education effects students in higher education, to which distance education may be an alternative in order to provide some relief. Distance education has been a more cost- effective form of learning, and can sometimes save students a significant amount of money as opposed to traditional education. Distance education may be able to help to save students a considerable amount financially by removing the cost of transportation.[44] In addition, distance education may be able to save students from the economic burden of high-priced course textbooks. Many textbooks are now available as electronic textbooks, known as e-textbooks, which can offer digital textbooks for a reduced price in comparison to traditional textbooks. Also, the increasing improvements in technology have resulted in many school libraries having a partnership with digital publishers that offer course materials for free, which can help students significantly with educational costs.[44] Within the class, students are able to learn in ways that traditional classrooms would not be able to provide. It is able to promote good learning experiences and therefore, allow students to obtain higher satisfaction with their online learning.[45] For example, students can review their lessons more than once according to their need. Students can then manipulate the coursework to fit their learning by focusing more on their weaker topics while breezing through concepts that they already have or can easily grasp.[45] When course design and the learning environment are at their optimal conditions, distance education can lead students to higher satisfaction with their learning experiences.[46] Studies have shown that high satisfaction correlates to increased learning. Students who are enrolled in distance education with high satisfaction in their online coursework are then motivated intrinsically to learn, which often means that their performance in class will improve.[46] For those in a healthcare or mental health distance learning program, online-based interactions have the potential to foster deeper reflections and discussions of client issues[33] as well as a quicker response to client issues, since supervision happens on a regular basis and is not limited to a weekly supervision meeting.[36] This also may contribute to the students feeling a greater sense of support, since they have ongoing and regular access to their instructors and other students.[33][36] Distance learning may enable students who are unable to attend a traditional school setting, due to disability or illness such as decreased mobility and immune system suppression, to get a good education.[47] Distance education may provide equal access regardless of socioeconomic status or income, area of residence, gender, race, age, or cost per student.[48] Applying universal design strategies to distance learning courses as they are being developed (rather than instituting accommodations for specific students on an as-needed basis) can increase the accessibility of such courses to students with a range of abilities, disabilities, learning styles, and native languages.[49] Distance education graduates, who would have never have been associated with the school under a traditional system, may donate money to the school.[50] Distance Learning may also offer a final opportunity for adolescences that are no longer permitted in the General Education population due to behavior disorders. Instead of these students having no other academic opportunities, they may continue their education from their homes and earn their diplomas, offering them another chance to be an integral part of society. Criticism
  • 8. Barriers to effective distance education include obstacles such as domestic distractions and unreliable technology,[51] as well as students' program costs, adequate contact with teachers and support services, and a need for more experience.[52] Some students attempt to participate in distance education without proper training of the tools needed to be successful in the program. Students must be provided with training on each tool that is used throughout the program. The lack of advanced technology skills can lead to an unsuccessful experience. Schools have a responsibility to adopt a proactive policy for managing technology barriers.[53] The results of a study of Washington state community college students showed that distance learning students tended to drop out more often than their traditional counterparts due to difficulties in language, time management, and study skills.[54] There is a theoretical problem about the application of traditional teaching methods to online courses because online courses may have no upper size limit. Daniel Barwick noted that there is no evidence that large class size is always worse or that small class size is always better, although a negative link has been established between certain types of instruction in large classes and learning outcomes; he argued that higher education has not made a sufficient effort to experiment with a variety of instructional methods to determine whether large class size is always negatively correlated with a reduction in learning outcomes.[55] Early proponents of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC)s saw them as just the type of experiment that Barwick had pointed out was lacking in higher education, although Barwick himself has never advocated for MOOCs. Finally, there may also be institutional challenges. Distance learning is new enough that it may be a challenge to gain support for these programs in a traditional brick-and-mortar academic learning environment.[33] Furthermore, it may be more difficult for the instructor to organize and plan a distance learning program,[36] especially since many are new programs and their organizational needs are different from a traditional learning program. Open universities From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search The term open university or open universities usually refers to a university with an open-door academic policy, i.e. no entry requirements. The term may specifically refer to: The Open University in the UK Open Universiteit Nederland in the Netherlands Open University of Mauritius in Mauritius Hellenic Open University (ΕΑΠ, Ελληνικό Ανοικτό Πανεπιστήμιο) in Greece Open Universities Australia Open University Malaysia in Malaysia Indira Gandhi National Open University in India Krishna Kanta Handiqui State Open University in Assam, India The Global Open University Nagaland in India Allama Iqbal Open University in Pakistan Bangladesh Open University in Bangladesh
  • 9. Open University of Indonesia Open University of Israel Open University of Cyprus Open University of Japan Open University of Catalonia Polytechnic University of the Philippines Open University University of the Philippines Open University Open University of Sudan Open University of Hong Kong The Intercultural Open University Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University in Thailand Wawasan Open University in Malaysia Distance Education Council From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Distance Education Council Abbreviation DEC Formation 1985 Headquarters New Delhi Location Maidan Garhi, New Delhi-110 068, India Leader Chairman: Dr. M. Aslam,.[1][2] Director: Dr. Nalini A. Lele[1] Main organ Council Affiliations Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development Website Official website Distance Education Council (DEC) is an organisation based in New Delhi, India responsible for the promotion and coordination of the open university and distance education system and for determination of its standards in India. The Council was constituted under the Indira Gandhi
  • 10. National Open University Act (1985).[3][4] Its consistent with the duty of the University that takes all such steps as it may deem fit for the promotion of the Open University and distance education systems in the educational pattern of the country and for the coordination and determination of standards of teaching, evaluation & research in such systems; and in pursuance of the objects of the University to encourage greater flexibility, diversity, accessibility, mobility and innovation in education at the University level by making full use of the latest scientific knowledge and new educational technology, and to further cooperation between the existing Universities. It is considered necessary and expedient to establish a Distance Education Council as an authority of the University under Section 16 of the Act. [5][6][7] The Distance Education Council (DEC) is an apex body for the Open and Distance Learning (ODL) system in the country. It is empowered, under Statute 28 of the IGNOU Act, to act as an apex body for the ODL system. It is responsible for promotion, coordination and maintenance of standards of the ODL system. The Vice Chancellor of IGNOU is the ex-officio Chairperson of DEC. [8] In june 2013, UGC has taken over Distance Education Council. The UGC has constituted a Committee to examine the pending proposals of programme-wise recognition to the institutions. University Grants Commission (India) Abbreviation UGC Motto Gyan-Vigyan Vimuktaye (Knowledge Liberates) Formation December 28, 1953 Headquarters New Delhi Location India Chairman Prof. Ved Prakash Affiliations Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development Website www.ugc.ac.in The University Grants Commission (UGC) of India is a statutory organisation set up by the Union government in 1956, charged with coordination, determination and maintenance of
  • 11. standards of university education. It provides recognition to universities in India, and disburses funds to such recognized universities and colleges. Prof. Ved Prakash, a noted academician and education administrator, is the incumbent Chairman of UGC, India.[1] Its headquarters are in New Delhi, and six regional centres in Pune, Bhopal, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Guwahati and Bangalore.[2] Contents 1 History 2 UGC's Mandate 3 Professional councils 4 Plans for closing 5 References 6 External links History UGC was recommended in 1945 and formed in 1946 to oversee the work of the three Central Universities of Aligarh, Banaras and, Delhi. In 1947, the Committee was entrusted with the responsibility of dealing with all the then existing Universities. After independence, the University Education Commission was set up in 1948 under the Chairmanship of S. Radhakrishnan and it recommended that the UGC be reconstituted on the general model of the University Grants Commission of the United Kingdom. UGC was formally inaugurated by Abul Kalam Azad, the Minister of Education, Natural Resources and Scientific Research on 28 December 1953. The UGC was however, formally established in November 1956, by an Act of Parliament as a statutory body of the Government of India. In order to ensure effective region-wise coverage throughout the country, the UGC has decentralised its operations by setting up six regional centres at Pune, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Bhopal, Guwahati and Bangalore. The head office of the UGC is located at Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg in New Delhi, with two additional bureaus operating from 35, Feroze Shah Road and the South Campus of University of Delhi as well. UGC's Mandate The UGC has the unique distinction of being the only grant-giving agency in the country which has been vested with two responsibilities: that of providing funds and that of coordination, determination and maintenance of standards in institutions of higher education. The UGC's mandate includes: Promoting and coordinating university education. Determining and maintaining standards of teaching, examination and research in universities. Framing regulations on minimum standards of education. Monitoring developments in the field of collegiate and university education; disbursing grants to the universities and colleges.
  • 12. Serving as a vital link between the Union and state governments and institutions of higher learning. Advising the Central and State governments on the measures necessary for improvement of university education. Professional councils UGC currently conducts NET for appointments of teachers in colleges and universities. It has made NET qualification mandatory for teaching at Graduation level and at Post Graduation level since July 2009. However, those with Ph.D are given five percent relaxation. Accreditation for higher learning over Universities under the aegis of University Grants Commission is overseen by following sixteen autonomous statutory institutions :[3][4] All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) Distance Education Council (DEC) Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) Bar Council of India (BCI) National Council for Teacher Education (NCTE) Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI) Medical Council of India (MCI) Pharmacy Council of India (PCI) Indian Nursing Council (INC) Dental Council of India (DCI) Central Council of Homoeopathy (CCH) Central Council of Indian Medicine (CCIM) Rehabilitation Council[4] National Council for Rural Institutes State Councils of Higher Education Council of Architecture Plans for closing In 2009, the Union Minister of Education made open the government of India's plans to close down UGC and the related body All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE), in favour of a higher regulatory body with more sweeping powers.[5] As of 2013 the UGC is still operating. References 1. ^ Prof. Ved Prakash, Chairman, University Grants Commission, New Delhi. Ugc.ac.in. Retrieved on 2013-07-16. 2. ^ University Grants Commission Govt. of India website. 3. ^ "Higher education in India". Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. Retrieved 2009-11-16. 4. ^ a b "Professional Councils". 'University Grants Commission' (UGC) website. 5. ^ "UGC, AICTE to be scrapped: Sibal". iGovernment.in. Retrieved 29 November 2011.
  • 13. NCTE From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search NCTE may refer to: The National Center for Transgender Equality The US-based National Council of Teachers of English The National Centre for Technology in Education, an Irish Government agency National Council for Teacher Education, the top government of India body regulating institutions providing education in teacher training in India. Kind Atten: All Stand Alone Teacher Training Institutions to upload their data/information on the NIC Portal in the DCF-III for conducting an All India Survey of Higher Education. Constitution of the Council and Its Notification Accounting Standards in Educational Institutions Recognition Status of Calorx Institute of Education (under the aegis of Calorx Teachers University), Ahmedabad. Increase in Processing Fee prescribed in Clause - 6 of NCTE Regulation 2009 Welcome to NCTE, New Delhi The National Council for Teacher Education, in its previous status since 1973, was an advisory body for the Central and State Governments on all matters pertaining to teacher education, with its Secretariat in the Department of Teacher Education of the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT). Despite its commendable work in the academic fields, it could not perform essential regulatory functions, to ensure maintenance of standards in teacher education and preventing proliferation of substandard teacher education institutions. The National Policy on Education (NPE), 1986 and the Programme of Action there under, envisaged a National Council for Teacher Education with statutory status and necessary resources as a first step for overhauling the system of teacher education. The National Council for Teacher Education as a statutory body came into existence in pursuance of the National Council for Teacher Education Act, 1993 (No. 73 of 1993) on the 17th August,1995.
  • 14. The main objective of the NCTE is to achieve planned and coordinated development of the teacher education system throughout the country, the regulation and proper maintenance of Norms and Standards in the teacher education system and for matters connected therewith. All India Council for Technical Education From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This article's factual accuracy may be compromised due to out-of-date information. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (April 2012) All India Council for Technical Education Abbreviation AICTE Formation November, 1945 Headquarters New Delhi Location Thiruvananthapuram,Kolkata, Chennai, Kanpur, Mumbai, Chandigarh, Guwahati, Bhopal, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Gurgaon[1] Main organ Council Affiliations Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development Website http://www.aicte-india.org/ Remarks Dr. S S Mantha, Chairperson (acting)
  • 15. The All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) is the statutory body and a national-level council for technical education, under Department of Higher Education, Ministry of Human Resource Development.[2] Established in November 1945 first as an advisory body and later on in 1987 given statutory status by an Act of Parliament, AICTE is responsible for proper planning and coordinated development of the technical education and management education system in India. The AICTE accredits postgraduate and graduate programs under specific categories at Indian institutions as per its charter.[3] It is assisted by 10 Statutory Boards of Studies, namely, UG Studies in Eng. & Tech., PG and Research in Eng. and Tech., Management Studies, Vocational Education, Technical Education, Pharmaceutical Education, Architecture, Hotel Management and Catering Technology, Information Technology, Town and Country Planning. The AICTE has its headquarters in 7th Floor, Chanderlok Building, Janpath, New Delhi, which has the offices of the chairman, vice-chairman and the member secretary, plus it has regional offices at Kolkata, Chennai, Kanpur, Mumbai, Chandigarh, Guwahati, Bhopal, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Gurgaon.[4] Contents o 1 Objectives  1.1 The AICTE Act of 1987  1.2 Current objective o 2 AICTE bureaus o 3 Increase in approved institutions o 4 Reforms o 5 See also o 6 External links o 7 References Objectives The AICTE Act of 1987 AICTE is vested with statutory authority for planning, formulation and maintenance of norms and standards, quality assurance through school accreditation, funding in priority areas, monitoring and evaluation, maintaining parity of certification and awards and ensuring coordinated and integrated development and management of technical education in the country as part of the AICTE Act No. 52 of 1987. The AICTE Act, stated verbatim reads: To provide for establishment of an All India council for Technical Education with a view to the proper planning and co-ordinated development of the technical education system throughout the country, the promotion of qualitative improvement of such education in relation to planned quantitative growth and the regulation and proper maintenance of norms and standards in the technical education system and for matters connected therewith.
  • 16. Current objective In order to improve upon the present technical education system, the current objectives is to modify the engineering curriculum as follows: 8. Greater emphasis on design oriented teaching, teaching of design methodologies, problem solving approach. 9. Greater exposure to industrial and manufacturing processes. 10. Exclusion of outmoded technologies and inclusion of the new appropriate and emerging technologies. 11. Greater input of management education and professional communication skills. AICTE bureaus The AICTE comprises nine bureaus, namely: o Faculty Development (FD) Bureau o Undergraduate Education (UG) Bureau o Postgraduate Education and Research (PGER) Bureau o Quality Assurance (QA) Bureau o Planning and Co-ordination (PC) Bureau o Research and Institutional Development (RID) Bureau o Administration (Admin) Bureau o Finance (Fin) Bureau o Academic (Acad) Bureau For each bureau, adviser is the bureau head who is assisted by technical officers and other supporting staff. The multidiscipline technical officer and staff of the Council are on deputation or on contract from government departments, University Grants Commission, academic institutions, etc. Increase in approved institutions Growth of Seats in different Programs in Technical Institutions[5] Year Engineering Management MCA Pharmacy Architecture HMCT Total 2005- 06 499697 122663 61991 32708 4379 4435 725873 2006- 07 550986 144372 63394 39517 4543 4242 807054 2007- 08 653290 185780 78692 52334 4543 5275 979914 2008- 841018 227989 82578 64211 4543 5794 1226133
  • 17. 09 2009- 10 1071896 273732 121123 72836 4133 6387 1550107 2010- 11 1324246 378907 135173 103867 4933 7061 1954482 Reforms In 2009, the Union Minister of Education formally communicated his intentions of closing down AICTE and related body, the University Grants Commission (UGC).[6] This later led to reforms in the way the AICTE approves institutes, and to establishing the National Board of Accreditation (NBA) as an independent body.[7] As of 2013 the AICTE still operates. See also o Regional accreditation o Education in India o DOEACC o Science and technology in India External links o Official web site References 26. ^ Regional Offices AICTE website. 27. ^ Technical Education Overview Department of Higher Education 28. ^ AICTE Act[dead link] 29. ^ National Level Councils Tech Ed., Department of Higher Education. 30. ^ Growth of institutions affiliated to AICTE 31. ^ "UGC, AICTE to be scrapped: Sibal". iGovernment.in. Retrieved 29 November 2011. 32. ^ "AICTE to revamp its approval system next week". Business Standard. Retrieved 29 November 2011. Bar Council of India From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  • 18. Jump to: navigation, search This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2009) Law of India This article is part of the series: Judiciary of India Administration[show] Civil courts[show] Criminal courts[show] Executive Court[show] Legal profession[show] Legal education[show] view talk edit The Bar Council of India is a statutory body that regulates and represents the Indian bar. It was created by Parliament under the Advocates Act, 1961. It prescribes standards of professional conduct, etiquettes and exercises disciplinary jurisdiction over the bar. It also sets standards for legal education and grants recognition to Universities whose degree in law will serve as a qualification for students to enroll themselves as advocates upon graduation.[1] Contents 1 History 2 Functions 3 Constitution 4 Enrollment of advocates 5 Committees 6 Directorate of Legal Education 7 All India Bar Examination 8 References 9 External links History
  • 19. After the Constitution of India came into force on January 26, 1950, the Inter-University Board passed a resolution emphasizing the need for an all-India Bar and the importance of uniformly high standards for law examinations in different Universities. In May 1950, the Madras Provincial Lawyers Conference, held under the presidency of Shri S. Varadachariar, resolved that a committee appointed by the Government of India should evolve a scheme for an all-India Bar and amend the Indian Bar Councils Act such that it conforms to the new Constitution. On April 12, 1951, Shri Syed Mohammed Ahmad Kazmi, a Member of Parliament, proposed a bill to amend the India Bar Councils Act. The Government of India concluded that it was necessary for the Government to sponsor the Bill. In August 1951, a Committee of Inquiry was set up to consider the feasibility of a unified Bar in India, the continuance or abolition of the dual system of counsel for each state, possibility of a separate Bar Council for the Supreme Court and the revision of enactments related to the legal profession. On March 30, 1953, the All India Bar Committee, headed by Hon’ble Shri S. R. Das, submitted a report. This report proposed the creation of a Bar Council for each state and an All-India Bar Council as an apex body. It was suggested that the All India Bar Council should regulate the legal profession and set the standard of legal education. The Law Commission of India was assigned the job of assembling a report on judicial administration reforms. In 1961, the Advocates Act was introduced to implement the recommendations made by the All India Bar Committee and Law Commission. Shri M. C. Setalvad was the first Chairman and Shri C. K. Daphtary as the Vice Chairman. In 1963, Shri C. K. Daphtary became the Chairman and Shri S. K. Ghose became the Vice Chairman.[1] Functions Section 7 of the Advocates Act, 1961[2] lays down the Bar Council’s regulatory and representative mandate. The functions of the Bar Council are to: 1. Lay down standards of professional conduct and etiquette for advocates 2. Lay down procedure to be followed by disciplinary committees 3. Safeguard the rights, privileges and interests of advocates 4. Promote and support law reform 5. Deal with and dispose of any matter which may be referred by a State Bar Council 6. Promote legal education and lay down standards of legal education. 7. Determine universities whose degree in law shall be a qualification for enrollment as an advocate. 8. Conduct seminars on legal topics by eminent jurists and publish journals and papers of legal interest. 9. Organize and provide legal aid to the poor. 10. Recognize foreign qualifications in law obtained outside India for admission as an advocate. 11. Manage and invest funds of the Bar Council. 12. Provide for the election of its members who shall run the Bar Councils. 13: organize and provide legal aid to the scheduled cast. Constitution
  • 20. The Bar Council of India consists of members elected from each State Bar Council, and the Attorney General of India and the Solicitor General of India who are ex-officio members. The members from the State Bar Councils are elected for a period of five years. The Council elects its own Chairman and Vice-Chairman for a period of two years from amongst its members. Assisted by the various committees of the Council, the chairman acts as the chief executive and director of the Council. The current Chairman is Manan Kumar Mishra. He succeeded Ashok Parija who in turn succeeded Gopal Subramaniam who laid down office upon his elevation as Solicitor General of the country. The other members of the Council are: R. Dhanapal Raj, the Vice-Chairman of the Bar Council of India, enrolled in Tamil Nadu in 1978. He was first elected to the State Bar Council of Tamil Nadu in 1994 and to the Bar Council of India in 2005, where he was Chairman of the Executive Committee till 2007. Ashok Kumar Deb, the Managing Trustee of the Bar Council of India Trust, is the member from the State Bar Council of West Bengal. Milan Kumar Dey, who is the Chairman of the Executive Committee, is the member from the State Bar Council of Jharkhand. He enrolled as an advocate in 1990. He was elected member of the Bar Council of Jharkhand and a member of the Bar Council of India in 2006. Daulat Ram Sharma, the Associate Managing Trustee of the Bar Council of India Trust, is the member from the State Bar Council of Himachal Pradesh. He enrolled as an advocate in 1976. He was elected to the State Bar Council of Himachal Pradesh in 2000 and to the Bar Council of India in 2006. Brij Mohan Vinayak is the member from the State Bar Council of Punjab & Haryana. He enrolled as an advocate in 1979 and became a member of the State Bar Council of Punjab and Haryana in 2002. He became Vice-Chairman in 2005 and was elected member of the Bar Council of India in 2010. G E Vahanvati is the Attorney General of India and an ex-officio member of the Bar Council of India. Faisal Rizvi is the member from the State Bar Council of Chhattisgarh. He has practiced law since 1991. In 2002, he was first elected to the State Bar Council of Chattisgarh and was elected to the Bar Council of India in the same year. Rajendra B. Raghuvanshi is the member from the State Bar Council of Maharashtra & Goa. He enrolled as an advocate in 1981. He was elected Chairman of the Bar Council of Maharashtra and Goa in 1998, and in 2004, he was elected to the Bar Council of India. S. Gopakumaran Nair is the member from the State Bar Council of Kerala. Gopal Narain Mishra is the member from the State Bar Council of Uttar Pradesh. He enrolled in Lucknow in 1970. He was first elected to the State Bar Council of Uttar Pradesh in 1994 and to the Bar Council of India in 2006. N. Ramchander Rao is the member from the State Bar Council of Andhra Pradesh.He enrolled as an advocate in 1986.He was elected to the andhra pradesh bar council in 2006 and 2012.He was elected to the bar council of India for the first time in 2012. Hemantkumar J. Patel is the member from the State Bar Council of Gujarat. He enrolled in Ahmedabad in 1977. He was first elected to the State Bar Council of Gujarat in 1994 and to the Bar Council of India in 2006. Ashok Parija is the member from the State Bar Council of Orissa. Zafar Ahmed Khan is the member from the State Bar Council of Madhya Pradesh. He enrolled
  • 21. as an advocate in 1973. He was first elected member of the State Bar Council of Madhya Pradesh in 2008 and a member of the Bar Council of India in the same year. Jagdeesh C M is the member from the State Bar Council of Karnataka. He enrolled as an advocate in 1981 and was elected as a member of the State Bar Council of Karnataka in 2006. In 2008, he was elected to the Bar Council of India. Apurba Kumar Sharma is the member from the State Bar Council of Assam, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Sikkim and Arunachal Pradesh. Vijay Bhatt is the member from the State Bar Council of Uttarakhand. He was first elected to the State Bar Council of Uttarkhand in 2004. He was elected to the Bar Council of India in 2010. Biri Singh Sinsinwar is the member from the State Bar Council of Rajasthan. He was elected Chairman of the Bar Council of Rajasthan in 2003 and recently to the Bar Council of India. Shri Rajinder Singh Rana is the member from the State Bar Council of Delhi. He was first elected to the state Bar Council of Delhi in 1998 where he became Vice Chairman in 2000. In 2010, he was elected to the Bar Council of India. He was arrested on 20 December 2010 by CBI on charges of taking bribe for granting recognition to a Law college in Ghaziabad.[3] Manan Kumar Mishra is the member from the State Bar Council of Bihar. He enrolled as an advocate in 1980 and was elected a member of the State Bar Council of Bihar in 1988. He was elected to the Bar Council of India in 2010. Enrollment of advocates Eligible persons are admitted as advocates on the rolls of the State Bar Councils. The Advocates Act, 1961 empowers State Bar Councils to frame their own rules regarding enrollment of advocates. The Council’s Enrollment Committee may scrutinize a candidate’s application. Those admitted as advocates by any State Bar Council are eligible for a Certificate of Enrollment. All applicants for enrollment as advocates are required under Section 24 (1) (f) of the Advocates Act, 1961 to pay an enrollment fee of Rs.600/- (Rupees Six hundred only) to the respective State Bar Council and Rs.150/- (Rupees One hundred Fifty only) to the Bar Council of India. These payments should be made using separate demand drafts. Committees The Bar Council of India has various committees that make recommendations to the Council. The members of these committees are elected from amongst the members of the Council. Executive Committee The Executive Committee is the head authority of the Council and responsible for giving effect to the resolutions of the Council. The chairman is Shri Milan Kumar Dey. The committee’s duties are to: 1. Manage and invest funds in a manner directed by the Council 2. Grant leave to staff members 3. Prescribe books of account, registers and files for the proper management of the Council’s affairs 4. Assign and supervise the staff’s work and define the conditions of service 5. Appoint auditors and determine their pay 6. Present the annual audit report, administration report and statement of account to the Council 7. Maintain a library and issue legal publications 8. Determine allowances to members of the different committees of the Council as well as staff members 9. Delegate any of the powers to the Chairman and/or Vice Chairman Legal Education Committee
  • 22. The Legal Education Committee make recommendations to the Bar Council of India on matters related to legal education. The Legal Education Committee has the authority to set standards of legal education, visit and inspect universities, recommend the pre requisites for foreign advocates practicing law in India, recommend recognition or discontinuance of a law degree from a University. The Chairman, presently Hon’ble Mr. Justice A. P. Misra, is elected by the members of the committee. Disciplinary Committee The disciplinary committee of the Bar Council of India reviews applications by persons against summary dismissal of their complaints against advocates for professional misconduct, by the State Bar Councils. Appeals lie before the Bar Council of India against orders of the disciplinary committees of the State Bar Councils. Every such appeal is heard by the disciplinary committee of the Bar Council of India, which may pass an order, including an order varying the punishment awarded by the disciplinary committee of the State Bar Council. Each disciplinary committee consists of three members. The term of the members of this committee is three years. Advocate Welfare Committee The Advocates Welfare Committee looks into applications made by advocates for welfare funds. It verifies the application and provides funds. The Advocates Welfare committee is certified by the Advocates Welfare Fund Act, 2001. Legal Aid Committee The Legal Aid Committee provides aids to those requiring legal assistance. Building Committee The Building Committee is responsible for setting up offices for the Council. Rules Committee The Rules Committee reviews the rules and regulations of the Council. Directorate of Legal Education The Bar Council of India has established a Directorate of Legal Education for the purpose of organizing, running, conducting, holding, and administering the following. (a) Continuing Legal Education (b) Teachers training (c) Advanced specialized professional courses (d) Education program for Indian students seeking registration after obtaining Law Degree from a Foreign University (c) Research on professional Legal Education and Standardization (f) Seminar and workshop (g) Legal Research (h)Any other assignment that may be assigned to it by the Legal Education committee and the Bar Council of India. All India Bar Examination On April 10, 2010, the Bar Council of India resolved to conduct an All India Bar Examination that tests an advocate’s ability to practice law. It is required for an advocate to pass this
  • 23. examination to practice law. This examination shall be held biannually, in April and November, and will test advocates on substantive and procedural law. It will assess basic analytical capabilities and knowledge of law. The syllabi for this examination will be published at least three months before the examination. An advocate may appear for the examination any number of times. Once the advocate passes the examination, he/she will be entitled to a Certificate of Practice. The first All India Bar Examination took place on December 5, 2010. It is mandatory for all future law graduates to clear this examination in order to practice law in India. Since then it has organised five more examinations (as of May 2013). References 1. ^ a b About the Bar Council of India 2. ^ Advocates Act, 1961 3. ^ Chauhan, Neha (21 December 2010). "CBI detains Delhi BCI member Rana amidst allegations of bribery". Legally India. Retrieved 12 July 2012. External links http://barcouncilofindia.org/ http://www.allindiabarexamination.com/ Ministry of Human Resource Development (India) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. The specific problem is: School education and literacy needs to be expanded. Please help improve this article if you can. (June 2011) Republic of India Ministry of Human Resource Development Department overview Formed Grameen Bharat Hindi Prachar Mandal
  • 24. Jurisdiction Republic of India Headquarters Shastri Bhawan, New Delhi Minister responsible Pallam Raju, Union Cabinet Minister for Human Resource Development Website mhrd.gov.in The Ministry of Human Resource Development (HRD or MHRD) (Hindi: ) is an Indian government ministry, responsible for the development of human resources. The ministry is divided into two departments: the Department of School Education and Literacy, which deals with primary and secondary education, adult education and literacy, and the Department of Higher Education, which deals with university education, technical education, scholarship etc. The erstwhile Ministry of Education now functions under these two departments, as of September 26, 1985.[1] The Ministry of Human Resources Development is headed by a minister of cabinet rank as a member of the Council of Ministers. The current minister of Human Resource Development is Pallam Raju. He is assisted by ministers of state for HRD, Shashi Tharoor and Jitin Prasada. Contents 1 Ministers of Human Resource Development 2 Department of School Education and Literacy 3 Department of Higher Education o 3.1 Organisational Structure 4 Inter-university centres (IUCs) 5 See also 6 References 7 External links Ministers of Human Resource Development Murli Manohar Joshi (1998-2004) Arjun Singh (2004–2009) Kapil Sibal (2009-2012) Pallam Raju (2012–Present) Department of School Education and Literacy The Department of School Education and Literacy is responsible for development of school education and literacy in the country. It works on ―universalisation of education‖ and for making better citizens out of youth.And it is also Human Republican Development.
  • 25. Department of Higher Education Main article: Department of Higher Education (India) The Department of Higher Education is in charge of secondary and post-secondary education. The department is empowered to grant deemed university status to educational institutions on the advice of the University Grants Commission (UGC) of India, under Section 3 of the University Grants Commission (UGC) Act, 1956.[2][3] The Department of Higher Education takes care of one of the largest higher education systems of the world, just after the United States and China. The department is engaged in bringing world-class opportunities of higher education and research to the country so that Indian students are not found lacking when facing an international platform. For this, the government has launched joint ventures and signed MoUs to help the Indian student benefit from the world opinion. Organisational Structure The department is divided into eight bureaus, and most the work of the department is handled through over 100 autonomous organisations under the these bureaus.[4] University and Higher Education; Minoritiese Education o University Grants Commission (UGC) o Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) o Indian Council of Historical Research (ICHR) o Indian Council of Philosophical Research (ICPR) o 39 Central Universities (including 12 new Central Universities which have been established w.e.f. 15.01.2009 by an ordinance promulgated by President of India) o Indian Institute of Advanced Studies (IIAS), Shimla Technical Education o All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE)[5][6] o Council of Architecture (COA)[7] o 3 School of Planning and Architecture (SPAs) o 16 Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) o 5 Indian Institutes of Science Education and Research (IISERs) o 13 Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) o 30 National Institutes of Technology (NITs) o 4 Indian Institutes of Information Technology (IIITs) o Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology o 4 National Institutes of Technical Teachers’ Training & Research (NITTTRs) o 4 Regional Boards of Apprenticeship / Practical Training Administration and Languages o Three Deemed Universities in the field of Sanskrit, viz. o Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan (RSkS)www.sanskrit.nic.in New Delhi, o Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth (SLBSRSV)www.slbsrsv.ac.in New Delhi, o Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth (RSV)www.rsvidyapeetha.ac.in Tirupati o Kendriya Hindi Sansthan (KHS), Agra o English and Foreign Language University (EFLU), Hyderabad
  • 26. o National Council for Promotion of Urdu Language (NCPUL) o National Council for Promotion of Sindhi Language (NCPSL) o Three subordinate offices: Central Hindi Directorate (CHD), New Delhi; Commission for Scientific & Technological Terminology (CSTT), New Delhi; and Central Institute of Indian Languages (CIIL), Mysore Distance Education and Scholarships o Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) UNESCO, International Cooperation, Book Promotion and Copyrights, Education Policy, Planning and Monitoring Integrated Finance Division. Statistics, Annual Plan and CMIS Administrative Reform, North Eastern Region, SC/ST/OBC Others: National University of Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA) National Book Trust (NBT) National Board of Accreditation (NBA) National Commission for Minority Educational Institutions (NCMEI) National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) Kendriya Vidyalaya Sangathan (KVS) Navodaya Vidyalaya Samiti (NVS) National Institute of Open Schooling (NIOS) Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) National Foundation for Teachers' Welfare a public sector enterprise, Educational Consultants (India) Limited (EdCIL) Central Tibetan Administration,(Buearu of HH the Dalai Lama),(Lajpat nagar),Delhi Inter-university centres (IUCs) Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Pune Inter–University Consortium for DAE Facilities, Indore Information and Library Network (INFLIBNET), Ahmedabad Consortium for Educational Communication (CEC) National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC), Bangalore Central Tibetan Administration, (Dharmsala) See also Department of Higher Education (Tamil Nadu) Department of School Education (Goa) References
  • 27. 1. ^ Ministry of Education Govt. of India portal. 2. ^ "Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IISST) Thiruvanathapuram Declared as Deemed to be University". Ministry of Human Resource Development (India), Press Information Bureau. July 14, 2008. 3. ^ "IIST gets deemed university status". The Hindu. Jul 15, 2008. 4. ^ ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Department of Higher Education. 5. ^ Technical Education Overview Dept of Ed. 6. ^ National Level Councils Tech Ed. 7. ^ Council of Architecture website. Coa.gov.in (1972-09-01). Retrieved on 2012-04-14. External links Official website Department of School Education and Literacy, website News Update on MHRD [http.poornachandra.co.in//index.php EdCIL, Website] List of universities in India From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search The University of Madras, established 1857, is one of the three oldest modern state universities in India, the others being the University of Calcutta and the University of Mumbai. The higher education system in India includes both private and public universities. Public universities are supported by the Government of India and the state governments, while private universities are mostly supported by various bodies and societies. Universities in India are recognized by the University Grants Commission (UGC), which draws its power from the University Grants Commission Act, 1956.[1] In addition, 15 Professional Councils are established, controlling different aspects of accreditation and coordination.[2] The types of universities include:
  • 28. Central universities, or Union universities are established by an Act of Parliament and are under the purview of the Department of Higher Education in the Union Human Resource Development Ministry.[3] The UGC lists 42 central universities.[4] State universities are run by the state government of each of the states and territories of India, and are usually established by a local legislative assembly act. As of 30 November 2011, the UGC lists 285 state universities.[5] The oldest establishment date listed by the UGC is 1857, shared by the University of Mumbai, the University of Madras and the University of Calcutta. Note that most State Universities are "affiliating universities" in that they administer a large number of "affiliated colleges" (many located in very small towns) that typically offer a range of undergraduate courses, but may also offer post-graduate courses. More established colleges might even offer PhD programs in some departments with the approval of the affiliating university. Deemed university, or "Deemed to be University", is a status of autonomy granted by the Department of Higher Education on the advice of the UGC, under Section 3 of the UGC Act.[6] The UGC list from 23 June 2008 lists 130 deemed universities.[7] According to this list, the first institute to be granted deemed university status was Indian Institute of Science which was granted this status on 12 May 1958. Note that in many cases, the same listing by the UGC covers several institutes. For example, the listing for Homi Bhabha National Institute covers the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, the Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences and other institutes.[8] Private universities are approved by the UGC. They can grant degrees but they are not allowed to have off-campus affiliated colleges. The UGC list of private universities from 7 June 2012 lists 112 private universities.[9] As of 22 June 2012, the total number of universities in India is 567. There are universities of some kind in each and every of the 28 states of India as well as three of the union territories, Chandigarh, Delhi and Puducherry. The state with the most universities is Tamil Nadu with 55 universities. It is also the state with the most deemed universities, numbering 29.[7] Andhra Pradesh has the most state universities (32),[5] Rajasthan the most private universities (25),[9] while Delhi and Uttar Pradesh have four central universities each, the largest number of all the states and territories.[4] Apart from the above universities, other institutions are granted the permission to autonomously award degrees. However, they do not affiliate colleges and are not officially called "universities" but "autonomous organizations" or "autonomous institutes". They fall under the administrative control of the Department of Higher Education.[10] These organizations include the Indian Institutes of Technology, the National Institutes of Technology, the Indian Institutes of Science Education and Research, the Indian Institutes of Management (though these award diplomas, not degrees)[11] and other autonomous institutes. These institutes are not listed below. Also not listed are institutes which are under the control of the professional councils, without approval of the UGC, e.g. Agricultural Universities, which are under the control of the Agricultural Education Division of the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), one of the professional councils.[12][13] Contents 1 Universities by state and type
  • 29. 2 Universities by type 3 See also 4 External links 5 References Universities by state and type Summary of universities in India by state and type State Central universities State universities Deemed universities Private universities Total Andhra Pradesh (list) 3 33 7 0 43 Arunachal Pradesh (list) 1 0 1 1 3 Assam (list) 2 4 0 2 8 Bihar (list) 1 15 2 0 18 Chandigarh (list) 0 1 1 0 2 Chhattisgarh (list) 1 10 0 4 15 Delhi (list) 4 5 11 0 20 Goa (list) 0 1 0 0 1 Gujarat (list) 1 18 2 11 32 Haryana (list) 1 10 5 6 22 Himachal Pradesh (list) 1 4 0 12 17 Jammu and Kashmir (list) 2 6 0 0 8 Jharkhand (list) 1 7 2 1 11 Karnataka (list) 1 22 15 2 40 Kerala (list) 1 11 2 0 14 Madhya Pradesh (list) 2 15 3 7 27 Maharashtra (list) 1 19 21 0 41 Manipur (list) 2 0 0 0 2 Meghalaya (list) 1 0 1 8 10 Mizoram (list) 1 0 0 1 2 Nagaland (list) 1 0 0 2 3 Odisha (list) 1 12 2 3 18 Puducherry (list) 1 0 1 0 2 Punjab (list) 1 7 2 3 13 Rajasthan (list) 1 14 8 25 48 Sikkim (list) 1 0 0 4 5
  • 30. Tamil Nadu (list) 2 24 29 0 55 Tripura (list) 1 0 0 1 2 Uttar Pradesh (list) 4 23 10 16 53 Uttarakhand (list) 1 6 4 6 17 West Bengal (list) 1 20 1 1 23 Total 42 286 129 115 570 % Does not include the National School of Drama which changed status on 7 October 2011, and its current status is unclear.[14] Universities by type List of agricultural universities in India List of central universities in India List of deemed universities in India List of forestry universities in India List of private universities in India List of state universities in India See also List of autonomous higher education institutes in India University Grants Commission (India) (UGC) External links Universities in India References 1. ^ "University Grants Commission Act, 1956" (PDF). Union Human Resource Development Ministry. Retrieved 3 September 2011. 2. ^ "::: Professional Councils-Inside H E – University Grants Commission :::". ugc.ac.in. University Grants Commission. Retrieved 11 August 2011. 3. ^ "Central Universities". mhrd.gov.in. Union Human Resource Development Ministry. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 4. ^ a b "Central Universities". ugc.ac.in. University Grants Commission. Retrieved 22 June 2012. 5. ^ a b "List of State Universities" (PDF). University Grants Commission. 30 November 2011. Retrieved 13 February 2012. 6. ^ "Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IISST) Thiruvanathapuram Declared as Deemed to be University". Union Human Resource Development Ministry, Press Information Bureau. 14 July 2008. Retrieved 3 September 2011.
  • 31. 7. ^ a b ":::Deemed University – University Grants Commission :::". ugc.ac.in. University Grants Commission. 23 June 2008. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 8. ^ "Listing of Homi Bhabha National Institute as deemed university". ugc.ac.in. University Grants Commission. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 9. ^ a b ":::Private Universities – University Grants Commission :::". ugc.ac.in. University Grants Commission. 7 June 2012. Archived from the original on 12 June 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2012. 10. ^ "Autonomous Bodies – Higher Education". education.nic.in. Union Human Resource Development Ministry. Archived from the original on 17 December 2010. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 11. ^ Mathang Seshagiri (1 May 2011). "It's time IIMs give degree, not diploma: Panel". articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com (Times of India). 12. ^ "Agricultural Education Division | Indian Council of Agricultural Research". icar.org.in. Indian Council of Agricultural Research. Retrieved 11 August 2011. 13. ^ "Universities | Indian Council of Agricultural Research". icar.org.in. Indian Council of Agricultural Research. Retrieved 11 August 2011. 14. ^ "NSD loses deemed varsity status on own request". The Hindu. 7 October 2011. Retrieved 9 October 2011. Posted by IASAM ACADEMY at 22:28 Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to Facebook No comments: Post a Comment Home Subscribe to: Post Comments (Atom) Blog Archive ▼ 2013 (11) o ▼ August (9)  Distance Education Council  All India Council for Technical Education  Bar Council of India  Abouts List of universities in India  Ministry of Human Resource Development (India)  All India Council for Technical Education  How Distance Education Works  Distance education, distance learning, dlearning H...  How Distance Education Works o ► June (2) About Me
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