Experiential Workshop September 2013
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Experiential Workshop September 2013

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  • The losses occur in all people (universal). The losses are gradual (progressive). The losses cannot be corrected (intrinsic).
  • Different eye conditions may have a variety of effects on individuals, but very few people see nothing at all. It is not unusual for someone to have more than one eye condition, complicating the way they see things. Cataracts : Everything looks blurred and misty, Makes reading and seeing detailed information difficult, Less of a problem for mobility, provided there is enough contrast in the environment Glaucoma : This shows an advanced stage of tunnel vision. People can experience problems with reading if the central vision is affected as well, but will experience major problems with mobility as the peripheral vision is very limited. With extreme tunnel vision it is often possible to read small print but not extra large print. Age related macular degeneration: It affects the central vision which is needed for precision work, reading and our ability to appreciate colour. People also experience problems with recognising people’s faces. People will generally be able to retain their independence in mobility. In general, magnification and high levels of illumination will assist in reading and other near vision tasks. Diabetic retinopathy: There is a patchy sight loss and can vary on a daily basis, People experience problems with near and distance vision, One of the side effects of diabetes is poor circulation which can often result in poor tactual sensitivity which means that few diabetics can read Braille
  • Contrast: Two main roles: 1) Makes print stand out - makes it easier to read Even if print blurred at this distance, contrast of black on white shows person where to expect to find the print - they can then bring clock closer in to eye to read print 2) Makes buttons easier to locate Print and Non-print users can more easily identify the location of buttons and controls provided that they contrast well with their background There are two key factors that effect contrast: colour and tone Partial sight, aging and congenital deficits all produce changes in perception that reduce the visual effectiveness of certain colour combinations. With age some shades of blue, green and violet may become confused; so avoid these colour combinations where possible Over 10% of males (less than 0.5% females) have problems in distinguishing Red/Green, so avoid using Red and Green together A significant proportion of people who are partially sighted also have difficulty with colour perception In general tonal contrast is more important than colour contrast, ie the difference between relative lightness and darkness of colours used. The greater the difference between tones (lightness and darkness) used, the more effective the contrast. Black and white provides the best tonal contrast, but many other colour combinations, for example light yellow and dark blue have a good tonal and colour contrast.
  • Inclusive design encourages manufacturers and providers to define the target population as the maximum number of people who could use the product and it aims to minimise the number (at the top of pyramid below) for whom specially adapted products are required. Inclusive design also encourages designers and providers to gain an understanding of the needs and abilities of the diverse market and how consumer needs may alter with age and changing ability.
  • Older People are an increasing proportion of the population. Many have special needs, but collectively they form an important part of the consumer market. What are their needs and aspirations, and what barriers do they experience in accessing goods and services? This interactive and simulation workshop is based on the ´Through other Eyes´ programme originated by gerontologists in Ontario and will enable participants to explore the realities of design for older people. It will offer a powerful insight into what it is like to be older & excluded due to physical and sensory impairments, the environment &/or service or product design. The programme facilitates experiential learning which challenges attitudes to older people and the design, development and packaging of products and services provided for them.
  • The losses occur in all people (universal). The losses are gradual (progressive). The losses cannot be corrected (intrinsic).
  • Different eye conditions may have a variety of effects on individuals, but very few people see nothing at all. It is not unusual for someone to have more than one eye condition, complicating the way they see things. Cataracts : Everything looks blurred and misty, Makes reading and seeing detailed information difficult, Less of a problem for mobility, provided there is enough contrast in the environment Glaucoma : This shows an advanced stage of tunnel vision. People can experience problems with reading if the central vision is affected as well, but will experience major problems with mobility as the peripheral vision is very limited. With extreme tunnel vision it is often possible to read small print but not extra large print. Age related macular degeneration: It affects the central vision which is needed for precision work, reading and our ability to appreciate colour. People also experience problems with recognising people’s faces. People will generally be able to retain their independence in mobility. In general, magnification and high levels of illumination will assist in reading and other near vision tasks. Diabetic retinopathy: There is a patchy sight loss and can vary on a daily basis, People experience problems with near and distance vision, One of the side effects of diabetes is poor circulation which can often result in poor tactual sensitivity which means that few diabetics can read Braille
  • Contrast: Two main roles: 1) Makes print stand out - makes it easier to read Even if print blurred at this distance, contrast of black on white shows person where to expect to find the print - they can then bring clock closer in to eye to read print 2) Makes buttons easier to locate Print and Non-print users can more easily identify the location of buttons and controls provided that they contrast well with their background There are two key factors that effect contrast: colour and tone Partial sight, aging and congenital deficits all produce changes in perception that reduce the visual effectiveness of certain colour combinations. With age some shades of blue, green and violet may become confused; so avoid these colour combinations where possible Over 10% of males (less than 0.5% females) have problems in distinguishing Red/Green, so avoid using Red and Green together A significant proportion of people who are partially sighted also have difficulty with colour perception In general tonal contrast is more important than colour contrast, ie the difference between relative lightness and darkness of colours used. The greater the difference between tones (lightness and darkness) used, the more effective the contrast. Black and white provides the best tonal contrast, but many other colour combinations, for example light yellow and dark blue have a good tonal and colour contrast.
  • Inclusive design encourages manufacturers and providers to define the target population as the maximum number of people who could use the product and it aims to minimise the number (at the top of pyramid below) for whom specially adapted products are required. Inclusive design also encourages designers and providers to gain an understanding of the needs and abilities of the diverse market and how consumer needs may alter with age and changing ability.
  • Older People are an increasing proportion of the population. Many have special needs, but collectively they form an important part of the consumer market. What are their needs and aspirations, and what barriers do they experience in accessing goods and services? This interactive and simulation workshop is based on the ´Through other Eyes´ programme originated by gerontologists in Ontario and will enable participants to explore the realities of design for older people. It will offer a powerful insight into what it is like to be older & excluded due to physical and sensory impairments, the environment &/or service or product design. The programme facilitates experiential learning which challenges attitudes to older people and the design, development and packaging of products and services provided for them.

Experiential Workshop September 2013 Experiential Workshop September 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Thursday 19th September 2013 Tavis Suite 1-6 Tavistock Square London WC1H 9NA
  • Through Other Eyes Agenda – Morning Workshop 09:30 Ian Rutter, Senior Manager- Engage Business Network; Welcome 09:45 Caroline Hayden-Wright- Age UK Training; Workshop Briefing and Preparation. 10:15 ‘Though Other Eyes’ experience, which includes a short walk to Waterstones Gower Street 11:35 Refreshments 11:45 Debrief and Plenary; contextualising the learning experience 12:45 Lunch for both the morning and afternoon workshop sessions 13:30 Close Refreshments and Lunch very kindly provided by Waitrose
  • Through Other Eyes Ian Rutter Senior Manager, Engage Business Network
  • Introduction • Over 30 per cent of the UK population are above the age of 50 and they hold 80 per cent of the wealth in the country; • There are currently more people above the age of 60 than under 18; • By 2083 one in three people will be over 60; • Since 2010, spend for households that include an individual aged over 65 has risen from £109 billion to £120 billion per year. • Social role changes, physical and mental abilities, and occupational changes amplify the diversity of older people in many different ways.
  • Introduction • "Over 60% of respondents would visit the High Street more often if it presented more opportunities for social interactions." • "Going shopping is a leisure activity for 1 in 3 participants." • "54% of participants' shopping trips last one to two hours.“ Ageing Consumers: Lifestyle and Preferences in the current marketplace, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Twenty-three percent of people aged 65 and over have difficulty accessing a bus stop and 25% have problems finding a seat on buses and standing up for long periods of time • Furthermore, carrying goods can be difficult: 41% of older people have difficulty carrying their shopping home. • These mobility difficulties can influence switching loyalty between stores of a given type. Older people who find it difficult to get to large out-of- town supermarkets are likely to use local corner shops Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Once in-store, older people may have difficulty with poor store layout, particularly narrow aisles and poor shelf signposting, shelves that are too high or low, a lack of adequate rest and toilet facilities • In larger stores older people reported having some difficulty in finding a member of staff that is willing to help them. As a result, groceries may be purchased at an outlet with a higher level of service quality in comparison to other retailers even if prices are higher • Many people did not like to ask staff for help but when they did their experience with staff helpfulness varied. • Over a third of people aged 65 and over live alone (3.7 million people), and half of everybody aged 75 and over, compared to 16 per cent of all adults Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Many older adults find there is too much packaging on products, with the majority (65%) finding it hard to open their purchases. Opening jars and tins is particularly problematic with ‘easy-open’ products often being more expensive • Shopping on-line has become commonplace but 41 per cent of people aged 65 to 74 and 72% of those aged 75 plus have never used the internet • The cost of equipment and internet charges may be prohibitive for some older people while problems with poor eyesight and arthritis or other dexterity problems also play a part. Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Ageing Society : Design Challenges Physical Cognitive Economic Social / Emotional Reduced: • Mobility • Sight • Hearing • Dexterity • Touch Decline in • Memory • Information processing • Numeracy skills • Changes to income & spending patterns • Income value erodes over time • Diminished access to social networks • Changes in emotional needs / responses
  • Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Caroline Hayden-Wright
  • Key points of workshop • Participative workshop to increase understanding and empathy of impact of ageing • Age UK Team will be on hand at all times to provide support and guidance • Empathy tools will be applied prior to undertaking practical exercise of walking outside and experiencing retail environment • De-brief following exercise with opportunity for sharing and discussion • Reflection on relevance to business area
  • Human Ageing UNIVERSAL - everyone ages PROGRESSIVE - we cannot stop the process INTRINSIC - it is irreversible / cannot be corrected We will never be younger than we are today
  • Not a Homogenous Group • Ageing is an individual experience; people age in different ways • People’s response to and ability to cope with the ageing process, differs greatly
  • Biological Ageing – how do we age? HAIR HEARING BONES SKIN / TOUCH MUSCLE NERVOUS SYSTEM URINARY STYSTEM VISION SMELL / TASTE RESPIRATORY CARDIOVASCULAR GASTROINTESTINAL IMMUNE SYSTEM REPRODUCTIVE
  • Through Other Eyes Aspects of Natural Ageing Sensory Physical Cognitive Vision Locomotion Reach & Stretch Dexterity Intellectual Functioning Communication Hearing Touch Through Other Eyes
  • Cataract 13.7% Macular Degeneration 16.7% Glaucoma 5% Diabetic Retinopathy 3% Normal Vision 61.6% Source: www.nei.nih.goc/sims/sims/htm Vision – 4 Common Disorders in Later Life
  • De – Brief Session Strongest Impression / emotion? Hardest part? WHY? What "limited" you the most? What “helped”? HOW?
  • • something you would like changed • why do you want to change this? • what steps might progress this? Inclusive Approaches
  • CANCEL Clear ENTER Cancel Enter Colour Contrast
  • Improving Visual Packaging
  • Inclusive Design & Capability Source Benkztin & Juhlins, inclusive design: design for the whole population (2003) Disabled Reduced Capability Fully Capable Inclusive Design: “Design of mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, people with the widest range of abilities within the widest range of situations without the need for special adaptation or design” British Standard 7000 – 6: 2005
  •  Know the opportunities & challenges demographic change presents to providers of products & services  Recognise a range of physical & sensory changes that affect the capability of people in later life  Identify practical solutions for improving product & service provision for the ageing consumer marketplace Outcomes
  • Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Thursday 19th September 2013 Tavis Suite 1-6 Tavistock Square London WC1H 9NA
  • Through Other Eyes Agenda – Afternoon Workshop 13:30 Ian Rutter, Senior Manager- Engage Business Network; Welcome 13:45 Caroline Hayden-Wright - Age UK Training; Workshop Briefing and Preparation 14:15 ‘Though Other Eyes’ experience, which includes a short walk to Waterstones Gower Street 15:35 Refreshments 15:45 Debrief and Plenary; contextualising the learning experience 16:45 Close Refreshments and Lunch very kindly provided by Waitrose
  • Through Other Eyes Ian Rutter Senior Manager, Engage Business Network
  • Introduction • Over 30 per cent of the UK population are above the age of 50 and they hold 80 per cent of the wealth in the country; • There are currently more people above the age of 60 than under 18; • By 2083 one in three people will be over 60; • Since 2010, spend for households that include an individual aged over 65 has risen from £109 billion to £120 billion per year. • Social role changes, physical and mental abilities, and occupational changes amplify the diversity of older people in many different ways.
  • Introduction • "Over 60% of respondents would visit the High Street more often if it presented more opportunities for social interactions." • "Going shopping is a leisure activity for 1 in 3 participants." • "54% of participants' shopping trips last one to two hours.“ Ageing Consumers: Lifestyle and Preferences in the current marketplace, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Twenty-three percent of people aged 65 and over have difficulty accessing a bus stop and 25% have problems finding a seat on buses and standing up for long periods of time • Furthermore, carrying goods can be difficult: 41% of older people have difficulty carrying their shopping home. • These mobility difficulties can influence switching loyalty between stores of a given type. Older people who find it difficult to get to large out-of- town supermarkets are likely to use local corner shops Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Once in-store, older people may have difficulty with poor store layout, particularly narrow aisles and poor shelf signposting, shelves that are too high or low, a lack of adequate rest and toilet facilities • In larger stores older people reported having some difficulty in finding a member of staff that is willing to help them. As a result, groceries may be purchased at an outlet with a higher level of service quality in comparison to other retailers even if prices are higher • Many people did not like to ask staff for help but when they did their experience with staff helpfulness varied. • Over a third of people aged 65 and over live alone (3.7 million people), and half of everybody aged 75 and over, compared to 16 per cent of all adults Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Introduction • Many older adults find there is too much packaging on products, with the majority (65%) finding it hard to open their purchases. Opening jars and tins is particularly problematic with ‘easy-open’ products often being more expensive • Shopping on-line has become commonplace but 41 per cent of people aged 65 to 74 and 72% of those aged 75 plus have never used the internet • The cost of equipment and internet charges may be prohibitive for some older people while problems with poor eyesight and arthritis or other dexterity problems also play a part. Food Shopping in Later Life, 2012. Age UK
  • Ageing Society : Design Challenges Physical Cognitive Economic Social / Emotional Reduced: • Mobility • Sight • Hearing • Dexterity • Touch Decline in • Memory • Information processing • Numeracy skills • Changes to income & spending patterns • Income value erodes over time • Diminished access to social networks • Changes in emotional needs / responses
  • Through Other Eyes An Experiential Training Workshop Caroline Hayden-Wright
  • Key points of workshop • Participative workshop to increase understanding and empathy of impact of ageing • Age UK Team will be on hand at all times to provide support and guidance • Empathy tools will be applied prior to undertaking practical exercise of walking outside and experiencing retail environment • De-brief following exercise with opportunity for sharing and discussion • Reflection on relevance to business area
  • Human Ageing UNIVERSAL - everyone ages PROGRESSIVE - we cannot stop the process INTRINSIC - it is irreversible / cannot be corrected we will never be younger than we are today
  • Not a Homogenous Group • Ageing is an individual experience; people age in different ways • People’s response to and ability to cope with the ageing process, differs greatly
  • Biological Ageing – how do we age? HAIR HEARING BONES SKIN / TOUCH MUSCLE NERVOUS SYSTEM URINARY STYSTEM VISION SMELL / TASTE RESPIRATORY CARDIOVASCULAR GASTROINTESTINAL IMMUNE SYSTEM REPRODUCTIVE
  • Through Other Eyes Aspects of Natural Ageing Sensory Physical Cognitive Vision Locomotion Reach & Stretch Dexterity Intellectual Functioning Communication Hearing Touch Through Other Eyes
  • Cataract 13.7% Macular Degeneration 16.7% Glaucoma 5% Diabetic Retinopathy 3% Normal Vision 61.6% Source: www.nei.nih.goc/sims/sims/htm Vision – 4 Common Disorders in Later Life
  • De – Brief Session Strongest Impression / emotion? Hardest part? WHY? What "limited" you the most? What “helped”? HOW?
  • • something you would like changed • why do you want to change this? • what steps might progress this? Inclusive Approaches
  • CANCEL Clear ENTER Cancel Enter Colour Contrast
  • Improving Visual Packaging
  • Inclusive Design & Capability Source Benkztin & Juhlins, inclusive design: design for the whole population (2003) Disabled Reduced Capability Fully Capable Inclusive Design: “Design of mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, people with the widest range of abilities within the widest range of situations without the need for special adaptation or design” British Standard 7000 – 6: 2005
  •  Know the opportunities & challenges demographic change presents to providers of products & services  Recognise a range of physical & sensory changes that affect the capability of people in later life  Identify practical solutions for improving product & service provision for the ageing consumer marketplace Outcomes