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Slides from the Engage Business Network seminar on "Customer Service Delivery".

Slides from the Engage Business Network seminar on "Customer Service Delivery".

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  • Hi everyone, my name is Seema Jain. I am a Research Assistant from Brunel University with a background in Design.
  • INTRODUCTION TO STUDY From previous research into the usability of websites, specially with older people, it was evident that the usefulness of site maps was a greatly unexplored area of web design. We were looking to find out it site maps can help with the usability of websites as another tool for finding information on websites. Carrying out research into these variables should help us gain a much better understanding of how older people navigate around websites, how they interpret the different methods of finding information on there, why they search the way they do and where there could be areas for improving their experience. Previous research has looked into the the usefulness of site maps as a tool to improve the usability of website but this is dated and with a non-representative sample, not including anyone over the age of 50. It was also conducted in the US on American websites and therefore
  • Definition of a site map. Site maps can provide an overview of what is available on a website, being presented on one single page. It can also show how the sections relate to one another and the hierarchy of the site Its benefits the user by giving them an understanding of where they can go to find the information they require, on a single page (should be). They can be in the form of a-z indexes, dynamic (moving) diagrams, lists, and maps (pictorial representation of the part of site and how they link together) THE TERM ’SITE MAP’ TAKES INTO ACCOUNT ALL OF THESE VARIATIONS IN ITS DESIGN If it is designed well, it incorporates several layers of hierarchy without being so large as you lose the user’s grasp on the organisation of the site. It can be intended as an additional method of navigating through websites. Now to go onto the other functions available on websites….
  • These are the core tools (including the site map examples previously shown) where users can navigate through websites in order to arrive/browse information they desire. They are Main Navigation Footer Navigation – this can often be jumbled with legal t&cs, and information for web developers Side Menu – often a break down of the section/area the user is in from the main menu Quick Links – allow quick access to deeper areas in the site. May be used for popular links or to highlight desirable areas such as sales, new content or updates in information Search Field – search within the site itself. Not always reliable These will be explored in the study to see how the participants preferred to navigate through different kinds of website.
  • In order to find this out, I looked to design a protocol to test this with older users. WHAT WAS DONE Initially, I needed to decide WHICH websites to test with users. To do this 3 different academics tested 45 UK websites against website inclusive design guidelines, judging how good the sites were based on their consistency, feedback, and the way in which site maps were presented on the site. From this they were categorised into three different levels; Good, neutral and bad websites. The median from each of these levels was chosen to go onto testing with the participants USER TESTING 3 website were chosen by the median values but also making sure that they were well established and well known sites that had a good deal of traffic and came from different sectors. John Lewis, NHS Direct and ITV websites were chosen. These are in no particular order.
  • The three different conditions are one with a PC only, one with a site map of the website in questions show on a laptop alongside the PC and the third condition allowing the participant decide what tools to use themselves. The different conditions letting us see if there is any improvements in using websites with the help of site maps.
  • Participants were recruited based on them being aged 60 and over, and having at least SOME experience with the internet. When I say SOME I mean that they had to qualify for the study by having used functions before on the internet such as emailing, purchasing, browsing, social networking etc. This needed to that I could gauge how current internet users perform and would have an understanding of how to perform very basic tasks/functions on the internet. (this meant that I wasn't ‘teaching’ them how to use a mouse/web browser/how to type etc) The age requirements was stipulated to be 60 and above, mainly because the difference between a 40year old and a 55 year old may not actually be that great as this age group would be more likely to have frequent use with computers over the life rather than people 60 and over. The participants had a range of aptitudes for the internet use (this was tested in the study from the data on how many functions they perform on the internet (as mentioned above) and how often they used they internet. Now I am going to give you all a quick overview of the three websites that were tested, how the participants searched through the sites and some initial findings.
  • The example of a transaction-based site that was used in the study was the John Lewis website. Rather than target specific website geared towards selling to the older generation it was decided to test a well known website with the users and see how they coped with navigating around it. Here, participants were asked to look for a ‘cork bath mat’ and proceed to the screen where they could purchase it. This was done so that the facilitator could see how they coped with scrolling through a couple of pages of products and if they would be able to rule out the products that were not needed in order to find the correct one. Another reason the transaction-based website was studied was the nature of what if offer on the site. Generally these are sites where you can purchase something can have 1000s and 1000s of items, through which the user has to filter out which department they need to look in, what type of product and how much/material etc. Even when they arrive here they may still need to flick though some pages of product to arrive at the one they desire. As you can imagine, it can turn out to be quite confusing to figure out what you want when shopping online, never mind if the site is good or not.
  • The example of a transaction-based site that was used in the study was the John Lewis website. Rather than target specific website geared towards selling to the older generation it was decided to test a well known website with the users and see how they coped with navigating around it. Here, participants were asked to look for a ‘cork bath mat’ and proceed to the screen where they could purchase it. This was done so that the facilitator could see how they coped with scrolling through a couple of pages of products and if they would be able to rule out the products that were not needed in order to find the correct one. Another reason the transaction-based website was studied was the nature of what if offer on the site. Generally these are sites where you can purchase something can have 1000s and 1000s of items, through which the user has to filter out which department they need to look in, what type of product and how much/material etc. Even when they arrive here they may still need to flick though some pages of product to arrive at the one they desire. As you can imagine, it can turn out to be quite confusing to figure out what you want when shopping online, never mind if the site is good or not.
  • This shows an image of the homepage of the John Lewis website. The circles areas show promotionally where participants were drawn to first to look for the bath mat they were asked to find. Here the only options on the home page were to look in the main menu, the search field or the quick links available on the main areas of the page. As you can see most of them were directed to the sale quick links in the centre of the page, the idea of which is to lead the users deeper into the website quickly without the necessity of extra clicks. It is obvious that the designers of this website wanted to direct users to this area of the site as it was highlighting the offers that were available on the homepage. While it is good to highlight this to user, the participants who carried out the study seemed to get confused as to which section they were actually in. Reasons for this could have been that they didn’t read the headings on the page or that they were unaware that there was a separate non-sale section available to them where the full price item (and the bath mat) was situated.
  • This is an example of an Information based website, where there is a wide range of data, information and advice available to the users both at a high and more detailed level. NHS Direct is a site which offer all of these things related to the UK’s health care system. The participants we asked to find information on the chair of the board of director, Joanna Shaw. This was asked to see if the participants could understand which categories in the menu it would sit under and also determining their understanding of the information asked of them. While this may seem glaringly obvious to someone who is a frequent user of the internet, those with less experience may not be able to sift through as much information as quickly.
  • This is an example of an Information based website, where there is a wide range of data, information and advice available to the users both at a high and more detailed level. NHS Direct is a site which offer all of these things related to the UK’s health care system. The participants we asked to find information on the chair of the board of director, Joanna Shaw. This was asked to see if the participants could understand which categories in the menu it would sit under and also determining their understanding of the information asked of them. While this may seem glaringly obvious to someone who is a frequent user of the internet, those with less experience may not be able to sift through as much information as quickly.
  • This shows an image of the homepage of the NHS Direct website. The circles areas show promotionally where participants were drawn to first to look for the bath mat they were asked to find. Here the options on the home page were to look in the main menu, the search field or the footer menu available when scrolling to the bottom of the page. As you can see most of the participants were drawn to man menu at the top of the page, seemingly a logical step to take for anyone who is accustomed to using the internet. One reason for this could be that the main menu bar is separated from the rest of the page parts (directly below is a picture) and it grabs the attention
  • ITV.com is an example of a content-based website which offers the user entertainment through images, or streaming of online videos and music/radio Again there is a fair amount of information to sift through but this is also in the way of highly colourful graphics and images. Other features often used are rolling adverts and quick links The participants were asked to watch the latest episode of Emmerdale which airs on ITV at 7pm weekdays. Remember for this website the user would have to decided what programme they wished to watch as well as what channel it is on (ITV1, 2, 3 or 4) and whether the time/date is the correct episode.
  • ITV.com is an example of a content-based website which offers the user entertainment through images, or streaming of online videos and music/radio Again there is a fair amount of information to sift through but this is also in the way of highly colourful graphics and images. Other features often used are rolling adverts and quick links The participants were asked to watch the latest episode of Emmerdale which airs on ITV at 7pm weekdays. Remember for this website the user would have to decided what programme they wished to watch as well as what channel it is on (ITV1, 2, 3 or 4) and whether the time/date is the correct episode.
  • In comparison the the previous two websites, ITV has 5 options to access the menus and navigate through their website. Notably there is a another menu available further down the page to access the different TV shows ITV users can watch online and find information about. This may also be because the page is much more densely packed than JL and NHS Direct sites we have previously looked at. The circles areas show proportionally where participants were drawn to first to look for the episode of Emmerdale they were asked to find. Again the participants were able to take advantage of the quick links on the page here. Placing popular links on the homepage allows new and frequent users to get to where they need much quicker than they would otherwise.
  • OK here the table shows the percentage of task completion, average time taken and how many mouse clicks it takes for the participant to find the item asked. As previously mentioned, the three condition are visible on the first column. These being one with a PC only, one with a PC + Site map on a laptop and the third being the user’s own choice. As the participants goes through the three different conditions, their familiarisation is neutralised and each condition was tested with a different website, therefore no participant tested the same website more than once. This made sure that their task completion or time/clicks was not affected by them getting used to the website they were navigating around. Nb the average time taken is ONLY for those who completed. The last condition show that there is a clear improvement in the completion of the task for all three websites. This lends support to the idea that the participants improved during the 90minuted of the study, either through learning or gaining confidence as they went through the different conditions of the tasks set. However, when you look at the increase in time for John Lewis from using the site map to user’s own preference there is a significant increase. This is because many of the users were mislead by some of the quick links on the john Lewis homepage and were led to their clearance section. Once in this section they did not realise that not all of the product were displayed and it therefore took them more time to redirect/exit to the full price section (where the bath mat was situated). There is also an irregular increase in time over the condition 2 to 3 for NHS Direct. Here we can explain this detail by considering the difference in the conditions. In condition 2 there were set instructions of how to find the information required (ie using the site map to direct them to where they needed to go). However in the last condition they have the freedom to find the information whichever way they prefer so this time increase show their time taken for exploration.
  • Here the findings show an interesting take on we deem as success in website navigating. In the last condition the task completion is the highest percentage and there the participants had the greatest success in finding the information they were instructed to. However looking at the high values of average time and clicks, this shows that even though the most participants found the information, they took longer and therefore required more clicks. Contrastingly in condition 2 there were the lowest overall values for time taken and clicks, however the success of completion was not as high as the 3 rd condition. Form this we can see that less participants are finding information quicker in condition 2, but when they take more time, they have a better task completion rate. This is the Success VS user satisfaction tradeoff Fast users said: ‘I found the task ok/average’, ‘doesn’t seem to be any pattern or sense in the organisation of the site’ ‘ I wouldn’t be really bothered to look at a site map’, ‘OK’ Slow users: ‘Now that I have tried it and succeeded I want to try searching online again’, ‘I was determined to find the item’, ‘very interesting task’, ‘I am determined to find it so it was annoying when I experienced difficulties’. ‘It is never boring to do these things as I always want to learn and am interesting in knowing more’.
  • Hunting for information A low aptitude for the internet does not necessarily translate to task failure. There are successes but this group of users require a more direct route to the information they are searching for. Is supported by the fact that the majority of participants used the quick links on the ITV website and it had the highest task completion as the users did not need to delve deep into the website’es hierarchy/menus. This is proven in the increase in percentage of task completion through stages 1 to 3. They also have the INTEREST in learning. How aptitude effects usability if a user in unaccustomed to using a main menu on a webpage which drops down when you hover over it, they will then experiences problems with controlling this new feature when they come to use it. Another example could be that users who are not familiar with search fields within a site may not even attempt to use then as they prefer to go down routes which they know. Good website can lead to increased success in completing the task. [As the table data shows, there was an overall success rate of over 54% for each website/condition even though the aptitudes were H – 48.6%, M – 13.5%, L – 37.8%] Under half of the participants had a high aptitude for the internet but in some cases the completion rate was in the 90% region. What else to take note of Errors – clicking un unnecessarily, trouble scrolling, going into the wrong menu, didn't understand where the item would sit in the menu, problem with typing, did not understand how to user the main menu, kept on using the back button after navigating to the wrong page So far there seems to be little evidence to support the theory that site maps can improve the suability of website, the majority of the users were unaware of what one was, how to use it and even after being introduced to it they still preferred to go about searching their own way. ???
  • 1- they use previous knowledge and the analogy of a filing system to comprehend how things would be organised on a web site. In some cases, this proved very effective where the menus were logically organised and it was clear what would fall underneath the headings. In other cases, this linear view lead to them getting a little lost in depth of menus and not really having a clear strategy of how to exit them 2 -They care about the process of how they get to the information as well as finding it. 3 – the user satisfaction was not high, this was gathered from their feedback whilst using a site map. Even though it improved their task completion, time and click compared to the condition without a site map (C1), the user feedback was a great deal more negative. 4 – those with a lower aptitude had problems with exiting areas they were ‘funnelled’ into through quick links. Whilst these greatly improve usability in some cases, when the user is mislead or doesn't ’ t read the link properly they can experience difficulty I finding their way back as they have not experienced the ‘journey’/hierarchy of the menus to go back. This links back to the metaphor this age group had used to ‘map’ out how things are organised on the website.
  • Welcome questions at the round table discussion.
  • Pivotal part in the intranet and website project and less involved in the e-commerce project
  • Better user experience - we wanted to improve the navigation, functinality available on our intranet the site and shop etc. Flexible Platform Previous platform was very inflexible, although very accessible as just a case of hitting a button to convert structured word documents into html pages. Poor “templating” functionality High dependency on internal IT resources Too many tasks were “developer” tasks Consolidation of functionality: Opportunity to address duplicated functions (e.g. register for forums and e-Commerce) Design was really old fashioned and not a good advert for accessible design doesn’t have to be boring Wanted blind and partially sighted members of staff to be able to update the website as content coordinators
  • Decision for us to use Sharepoint had taken place by the time I arrived at RNIB. However there were a number of key drivers as to why we chose Sharepoint. We were very interested in the integration that could take place between Sharepoint, it's team site functionality and how that could work with Microsoft Office. Very attracted to the functionality that was available within Sharepoint - again particularly from an internal point of view. We wanted something that was scalable and had opportunities for us to run our 3 key platforms on - website, intranet and online shop. We needed to be able to develop it further in the future.
  • Before I arrived at the organisation 2 years of work had been done with an alternative company: Scoping of functionality through user stories IA of new site - masses of internal time spent on this! Design was created by the original suppliers - bought in another company to simplify the design and bring it more up to date.
  • Web standards: Browser compatibility? Users with access technologies are more likely to be running and out-dated browser so we had to deal with IE6. Also wider range of screen resolutions than many sites, and also access tech user such as JAWS and also screen magnifier users. WCAG (2.0 or 1.0?) (A, AA or AAA?) Section 508? (USA) PAS 78? SurfRight - our own standard is higher than AA standard Working together with agency who were new to Agile. As a project methodology this can only truly work if both organisations have dedicated resources co located. Content and Code decided to use Agile, whilst everyone from RNIB had only ever used waterfall. We found that the flexibitily of Agile didn't really work in our favour in the intranet. Drastic changes to website project, driven very much by the project manager. Excellent project managers on both sides. The project simply would not have happened without them. Wide range of stakeholders within RNIB and snap decisions whilst in the room could not always be made. Technical challenges Rich Text Editor Simple and accessible Accessibility can mean a longer process e.g. no drag and drop, web part editing Training Too much content for just webteam to migrate it. Never had to do it like this before. 2 previous website migrations and 2 intranet migrations had been done by webteam Content coordinators very varied in terms of skill set. Some excellent and some not so…only a small part of many of their roles All had been very used to our old CMS which was very easy to use, but not particularly CMS like… Hard at times to tell them what they should expect to find on screens when it wasn't there. Senior web editor had to write a training manual, whilst testing etc Content migration: 4,500 pages and documents 60 content co-ordinators Do not underestimate how long this can take: Had 1 member of staff on a year long contract to assist with intranet migration and web migration. 3 staff working full-time for 2 months Creation of basic HTML is quick Web parts and configuration takes longer User accounts, discussions and blogs Timescales Original system was organically grown over 5 years. New website system was built in 3 months! Synchronizing the release with other deadlines: Campaigns and Marketing Technology launches (Office upgrades?)
  • Internal expertise - web and digital marketing manager and senior web officer working majority of time on the project, BUT still BAU. Also an information architect who had worked at BBC, a knowledge manager who had worked extensively with SharePoint. Online surveys - we used prize draws to revisit what had been done 2 years earlier, to ensure we were still delivering what people wanted, both internally and externally. Internal focus groups - we used staff to run our ideas about intranet IA making it more task orientated and less organisationally structured than before. Also used staff to sense check on IA of external site - again building on work that had been done two years earlier. UAT - web and digital marketing team did masses of testing - Agile way meant that hard to envisage what the final product would look like. Often found that once one thing had been sorted and finished, something in the code had affected something that had previously worked for us. In house developers with a lot of experience around accessibility. Also web access consultancy - originally developers so masses of knowledge including working on WAI - WCAG 2.0 guidelines. External testing - used Bunnyfoot to test for accessibility and usability for website and ecommerce solution External feedback - asking for feedback on site once live, discussion forums etc.
  • Also negative points - masses of work to make this happen - off the shelf accessibility front and back end is HARD WORK!!! We now have a really customised version of SharePoint 2007, whilst the rest of the world goes marching on - what does that mean for us? Talks with MicroSoft around 2010 and trying to make that more accessible. Specialised skill set for this - difference between senior developers and support staff Very few skills in house, but are getting better…

Customer service delivery master presentation Customer service delivery master presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Customer Service Delivery Thursday 2 nd February 2012 Burroughs Room – The Wellcome Trust 183 Euston Road London NW1 2BE
  • Welcome Ian Rutter Senior Manager Engage Business Network
    • What is the Engage Business Network
    • Break down some of the barriers and misconceptions that prevent the
    • corporate world from fully exploring the market that is the over-50 consumer.
    • Foster the best in inclusive design across a wide range of products and
    • services, and to help promote these products and services to the over 50s
    • market, thereby improving the quality of life for the ageing population. 
    • By helping business to understand fully the complexities of the ageing
    • population, we hope that we can help to open up new routes to market.
    • Think “Customer” rather than “Age” 
    • Play a crucial role in stimulating and sharing good practice.
  • New Members Kohler-Mira BT ATOC Dignity Caring Funeral Services Panasonic
  • Our Speakers Jo Moran Moira Clark Nicola Millard
    • Agenda
    • 13:30 Registration
    • 14:00 Chair’s Welcome – Ian Rutter – Senior Manager, Engage Business Network
    • Speakers
    • 14:10 Jo Moran – Head of Customer Service, Retail Communication and Activity and Staffing,
    • Marks & Spencer
    • 14:45 Professor Moira Clark - Head of Marketing and Reputation, Director of The Henley Centre for Customer Management, Henley Business School, Reading University
    • 15:20 Break and refreshments
    • 15:40 Dr Nicola Millard – Customer Experience Futurologist, BT
    • 16:15 Questions and debate
    • 16:30 Drinks and networking
    • 17:15 Close
  • Customer Service & Your Brand: The Key Ingredient Jo Moran – Head of Customer Service, Marks & Spencer
  • What is a brand?
    • “ ... Name, term, design, symbol, or any other feature that identifies one seller’s good or service as distinct from those of other sellers...”
    • American Marketing Association
  • Service & The M&S Brand “ A brand isn’t what you say it is, it’s what Google says it is” Chris Anderson, The Long Tail
  • The customer voice… it’s loud and it’s out there!
    • SALE CUSTOMER:   I went to your xxxx store last week, it was like a jumble sale rails and rails of tat! Even one of the staff commented about it, good idea to send it to the charity shops.
    • CUSTOMER :  Just been in xxxx - hardly anything in the sale - at least, not anything I wanted. :(
    • HOW WILL YOU BE CELEBRATING NYE CUSTOMER : Would have been celebrating with a few more crisps & dips, but M&S xxxx decided to shut their doors 20 minutes early.
    • CHRISTMAS CUSTOMER : I tried 4 branches in west London for bread sauce and couldn't get any. In the largest branch at xxxx the customer Service was awful. When I asked if there would be any in today the response was ' I don't know' , no effort made to ask someone else or at least ask me Have spent a small fortune on M&S as I always do at this time of year, will go straight to waitrose next year!
  • What do customers expect from us?
  • Changing expectations
  • Service is the KEY ingredient Customer Experience Product Environment Service
  • Engagement matters. Making a connection Adding Value Employee Satisfaction Employee Loyalty Business Performance Investing Your Time Customer Satisfaction Customer Loyalty
  • Creating a Service Model... MOST MORE LESS Customer WHAT I’M LIKE AND WHY I’M HERE WHAT I KNOW WHAT I DO DELIGHT WELL-OILED MACHINE
  • The customer view.... 1 st Position You & Your Role Your Knowledge Your Experience 2 nd Position Your Customer Their Feelings Their Needs 3 rd Position Your M&S Future Sales Brand Reputation
    • Alison McCormack - Group Head of Digital, Age UK
    • Seema Jain – Research Assistant, Brunel University
  • Website usability with older people Seema Jain Research Assistant, Brunel University Multimedia Designer, Age UK
  • Contents Overview
    • The study’s motivation
    • Site map examples and definition
    • Navigational tools & strategies
    • User testing
    • Findings
    • Conclusions
    • References
  • Introduction A study to find out if site maps can help the usability of websites The motivation was to understand users’ behaviour when searching online and identify how usability tools, for example site maps, can be improved to support browsing
  • Site Map examples
  • Navigational Tools
  • The Study
    • Website testing
    • 45 UK websites were tested against inclusive guidelines for website and site map design
    • 3 different kinds of site were tested; information-based, transaction-based or content-based
    • User testing
    • 3 websites were tested;
      • John Lewis (Transaction-based)
      • NHS Direct (Information-based)
      • ITV (Content-based)
  • Study Conditions + + ? + Condition 3 Condition 1 Condition 2
  • The Participants
      • 37 participants who have had some experience with the internet.
      • Age ranged from 60 to 86 years old
      • Female 28
      • Male 9
      • Different range of aptitudes for using the internet.
  • Transaction-based John Lewis
  • Transaction-based John Lewis
  • 17 Sale quick link 14 Main menu 6 Search field Transaction-based John Lewis
  • Information-based NHS Direct
  • Information-based NHS Direct
  • 24 Main menu 9 Search Field 4 Footer menu Information-based NHS Direct
  • Content-based ITV
  • Content-based ITV
  • 18 Quick links 9 Main menu 3 TV shows menu 3 Footer menu 4 Search Field Content-based ITV
  • Findings Task Completion John Lewis NHS Direct ITV PC 53.9% 66% 83.3% PC + Site Map 57.1% 66% 90.9% User’s Preference 60% 92.3% 92.8% Average time (mins) and average clicks John Lewis NHS Direct ITV Time Clicks Time Clicks Time Clicks PC 3.07 7.5 2.28 5.5 1.20 2.9 PC + Site Map 2.46 5 1.28 2.3 2.44 4.7 User’s Preference 5.04 10 2.39 7.25 1.49 4.2
  • Overall Findings Task completion Average time taken (mins) Average clicks PC 67.6% 2.18 5.3 PC + Site Map 71.3% 2.06 4 User’s Preference 81.7% 2.97 7.15
  • Findings: participants
    • Navigation methods
    • Hunting for information
      • Position of information
      • Main menu as popular tool
    • How aptitude effects usability
      • A low aptitude for the internet does not necessarily translate to task failure
      • Older people with a low aptitude still demonstrate the ability to learn
  • Feedback: site maps
    • There was a significant improvement in task completion between the condition with a PC only and one with a site map.
    • It is helpful only if it is appropriately designed
    • The user’s experience with site maps is also notable. They said;
    • ‘ too cluttered and the text is too small to read’
      • ‘ too long a list to read through’
      • ‘ I have never heard of a site map before’
      • ‘ it should have had better headings’
      • ‘ don ’ t see a difference between using this or a normal menu’
  • Conclusions
      • Older users have the ability and interest in learning.
      • important as the success of finding it.
      • Site maps can increase the success rate of finding information but not the user satisfaction.
      • In order to cater for those with lower aptitudes, a more direct route to the information is required.
  • Thank You ! References Aptitude REDISH, G, D, CHISNELL. (2004). Designing Web Sites for Older Adults: A Review of Recent Research. AARP older wiser wired. [online]. Available from: www.aarp.org CHISNELL, D.A. J.C. REDISH, A. LEE (2006). New Heuristics for Understanding Older Adults as Web Users. Journal of Applied Research; Communication [online]. Available from: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/stc/tc/2006/00000053/00000001/art00006 Online Usability TEDESCO, D. , A. SCHADE, K. PERNICE and J NIELSEN (2008). Site Map Usability: 47 Design Guidelines Based on Usability Studies with People Using Site Maps [online]. Available from: http:// www.nngroup.com /reports/sitemaps/ CHADWICK-DIAS, A. D, TEDESCO. T, TULLIS (2004). Older Adults and Web Usability: Is Web Experience the Same as Web Expertise? Fidelity Center for Applied Technology, Human Interface Design [online]. Available at: http:// dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id =986072 NIELSEN, J. Designing Web Usability [Book]. New Riders Publishing, Indianapolis. 1999
    • Kelly Harrison - Web and Digital Marketing Manager, RNIB
  • Our web programme
    • Kelly Harrison
    • Web and Digital Marketing Manager
    • Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB)
  • Me and Us!
      • RNIB working to support almost 2 million blind and partially sighted people in the UK @ RNIB for over 3 years
      • http:// www.rnib.org.uk
      • [email_address]
      • < http:// uk.linkedin.com/in/kellyjharrison
      • Senior user on web programme for RNIB
  • What did we do?
    • Created a new intranet, website and shop for RNIB using an accessible version of SharePoint 2007.
  • Objectives of programme
    • Better user experience
    • Flexible platform
    • Consolidate and join up functionality
    • Refresh the design
    • Front and b ack end accessibility!
  • Why we chose SharePoint
    • Microsoft house
      • Office integration
    • Breadth of functionality available
      • Blogs, Wikis, Calendars, Document Management,
      • Collaborative Tools
    • Strategic decision – single platform
      • Website, Intranet, e-Commerce
  • Prep
    • User stories
    • Information architecture of navigation
    • Design
  • Challenges
    • Web Standards
    • New supplier/Agile
    • Technical Challenges + stakeholders
    • Training
    • Content Migration
    • Timescales + stakeholders
  • Testing and focus groups
    • Internal expertise
    • Online surveys
    • Internal focus groups
    • UAT from web and digital marketing team, developers and WAC
    • External testing
    • External feedback
  • End results - positive
    • Website and intranet live on time
    • E-commerce short delay
    • Universally good feedback
    • Accessible both front and back end
    • More flexible
    • More money in donations
    • Better user experience
  • Useful links
    • Equalities Act http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents
    • WAI WCAG overview
    • http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php#version
    • W3C WCAG 2.0 Guidelines
    • http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG/
    • WAI ARIA primer
    • http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-primer/
    • RNIB “Surf Right” guidance
    • http://www.rnib.org.uk/professionals/webaccessibility/services/siteaudits
    • RNIB - Web access consultancy
    • ht tp://www.rnib.org.uk/professionals/webaccessibility/Pages/web_accessibility.aspx
    • WAVE
    • http:// wave.webaim.org /
    • Bunnyfoot
    • http:// www.bunnyfoot.com /
    • Talia Findlay - Digital Marketing Manager, Apetito
  • Wiltshire Farm Foods
    • Introduction to Wiltshire Farm Foods
    • Understanding our Audience
    • Barriers to Overcome
    • Test, Learn, Refine
  • About Wiltshire Farm Foods
  • Our Audience
  • Vision
  • Motor Skills
  • Confidence
  • Confidence
  • Test, Refine, Learn
  • Test, Refine, Learn
  • Key Growth Channel 80% of online orders are placed by end consumers 20% are placed by influencers 13% of total retail sales 20% growth