Optics presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Optics presentation

on

  • 244 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
244
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
244
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Optics presentation Optics presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Stretching DNA with Optical Lasers M.D. Wang, H. Yin, R. Landick, J. Gelles, S.M. Block Biophysical Journal Volume 72, Issue 3, March 1997, Pages 1335–1346
    • Why do we want to stretch DNA? ­ Elasticity and mechanical flexibility of DNA is an  important factor in cellular functions ­ Researchers sought to gather data for comparison to  several preexisting models for the elasticity and  flexibility of organic polymers
    • Why optical tweezers? ­ Optical tweezers are one of the only options for  researchs who want to reproducibly manipulate  delicate matter on the scale of DNA strands. ­ Forces applied are in the picoNewton range (~.1 – 50  pN) ­ Position is monitored with a minimum resolution of 1  nanometer
    • How do optical tweezers achieve this?
    • Refracted photons are accelerated, causing the “trapped”  particle to experience a force.
    • Similarly, reflected photons also cause the particle to  experience a force.
    • Total forces for a particle in the center of the trap will sum to  zero.
    • As the particle strays from the center of the trap, the magnitude  of the individual vectors changes, and no longer neccesarily  sum to zero.
    • Hooke's Law ­ In many cases (but not all) the restorative force imparted by the  laser can be modeled with good using Hooke's law: F(x) = kx where the laser is incident parallel to the y­axis. ­ In this model k is no longer a “spring constant” but is a  function of the intensity of the laser and optical properties of the  particle being trapped. It is common to refer to the “stiffness” of  an optical trap.
    • Some important points: ­ It is possible to trap asymetric particles with the tweezers (ex. DNA  molecules), but spherical particles and the resulting symmetry of the  forces experienced is optimal.  ­ Trapped particles are usually dielectrics. ­ To work with in these limitations, the end of a strand of DNA is  attached to a polystyrene particle. The other end of the strand is  then attached to a moveable glass stage via RNA polymerase.
    • Controlling position: ­ Piezo stages are used to  alter and monitor the  stretch of each DNA  strand with sufficient  resolution. ­ Displacement in x is a  function of input voltage.  Similar in concept to a  solenoid, but with far  greater resolution.
    • Monitoring position:
    • Monitoring position:
    • AOM and Position Detector operation ­ The position detector send two output voltages,  one  each for the x and y axis, to the AOM unit. ­ The AOM unit then adjusts the laser's voltage in  accordance with the total displacement of the  trapped  particle. Voltage is increased until total displacement  falls to zero.
    • Using the data ­ Researchers can track the force experienced by  particle  at any given displacement, as it is a function of the  laser's intensity. ­ Comparing the force needed to keep the partice in the  trap as the piezo stage stretches the DNA, researchers  are able to calculate the elasticity.
    • Results
    • Sources: - M.D. Wang, H. Yin, R. Landick, J. Gelles, S.M. Block. “Stretching DNA with Optical Tweezers”, Biophysical Journal. Volume 72, Issue 3, March 1997  - Steve Wasserman, Steven Nagel. “An Introduction to Optical Trapping”, http://scripts.mit.edu/~20.309/wiki/index.php? title=Optical_trap, MIT Bioinstrumentation Teaching Lab. October 8, 2013