Semantic User Interfaces

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Talk given at Semantic Business 2011, London, UK

Talk given at Semantic Business 2011, London, UK

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  • often visually impressive but hard to use low-level structure not conceptual structure sometimes useful “meaningful” at the right level of description: the natural view of something may be much more compact than the “sum of triples” graphs can show heterarchical relations spatial location & proximity should be meaningful - what does it mean to be near or far from a given node? “management” console!
  • Always needed? No, but can be very powerful. With great power comes difficult problems that need solving! And perhaps a key for leaving the walled garden ad hoc data juggling: forcing users to use a spreadsheet, notebook or back-of-an-envelope to remember and keep track of investigation elements and criteria

Transcript

  • 1. Semantic User Interfaces Ian Dickinson Epimorphics Ltd [email_address] @ephemerian
  • 2. Agenda Context Semantic UI patterns Cautions
  • 3. Framing: who, what & why? “ Semantic user interface” ... For semantic professionals End-user value Triples inside
  • 4. We want to help users to:
    • do new things, or
    • 5. perform their current tasks more ...
    • technology is not the goal
  • 9. Patterns
  • 10. Travel travails
  • 11. Pattern: independent identities
    • the identities of things we are interested in are not tied to the application
    • 12. identities can be:
  • 16. Let's visit ... Berlin
    • which is ...
      • within Land Berlin
      • 17. which is within FDR
    • also which
      • contains Mitte district
      • 18. which contains Museum Island
      • 19. which contains the Pergamon Museum
  • 20. Pattern: use “spine” datasets
    • relate identifiers to widely-used:
    • dbpedia, geonames, umbel, ... many more
    • 23. present users with richer descriptions
  • 24. Location, location, integration
  • 25. R&D R&D
  • 26.  
  • 27. Pattern: visualizing data linkages
    • heterogeneous data
    • 28. reduce cognitive workload
    • 29. show relationships
      • common identifiers
      • 30. common properties
    • support sense-making, choice forming, decisions
  • 31. The ubiquitous tag
  • 32. Pattern: linked-data tags
    • re-usable identity -> re-usable tag
    • 33. retain free-form tags
      • but relate to shared vocabularies
    • auto-tagging
    • 34. semantic query
  • 35. Triples: visible or invisible? vs.
  • 36. Pattern: hide low-level structure
    • users don't think in triples
    • 37. visible objects should represent meaningful things
    • 38. stick & bubble graphs: limited utility
  • 39. Where am I? Where next?
  • 40. Facets: here & next step filters where we are now? choices for the next facet search step
  • 41. Pivoting: stepping to adjacent topic all presidents all presidents' spouses
  • 42. Related items or an associated topic an alternate spelling “ discover”
  • 43. Pattern: rich navigation
    • explicit
      • current location
      • 44. history (and bookmarks)
      • 45. choices for next step
      • 46. collections of results
      • 47. signifiers
    • create actions from discovered data
  • 48. Pattern: generate additional structure
    • Vocabularies and ontologies provide opportunities to add structure
    • change user's perspective
  • 51. Pattern: follow a link
    • allow user to view any link reference
    • 52. display the content as usefully as possible
  • 53. Design dilemma
    • Flexible UX:
    • Classic UX:
  • 58. Semantic UX redux
    • Semantics: powerful techniques giving users
      • flexibility
      • 59. autonomy
      • 60. maybe an end to ad hoc data juggling
    • Needs a suitably hard problem
  • 65. Conclusion
    • Sampling of patterns for semantic UI's
      • identities not tied to applications
      • 66. rich navigation
      • 67. visualise interrelationships
      • 68. create actions from found data
    • Let's find some interesting problems!
  • 69. Acknowledgements
      I would like to thank the following for their kind permission to use content:
      • photos (CC-by license)
        • Flipchart – Tim Cayne s http://www.flickr.com/photos/timcaynes/637988053/
        • 70. Dunes pattern – Mollivan Jon http://www.flickr.com/photos/mollivan_jon/347366159/
        • 71. Wooden bench – MaretH. http://www.flickr.com/photos/maret1983/6057025004/
        • 72. Tree climbing – drainhook http://www.flickr.com/photos/drainhook/4643191611/
        • 73. Tug of war – Eric Skiff http://www.flickr.com/photos/ericskiff/517809478/
        • 74. Headlington Shark – DaveyBot http://www.flickr.com/photos/davemorris/144525103/
      • app screenshots
        • Oliver O'Brien (@oobr) – London Bike Share bikes.oobrien.com/
        • 75. Talis – BIS research funding consulting.talis.com/case-study/bis-research-funding-explorer/
        • 76. Marti Hearst (U. Berkeley) – Flamenco facet browser flamenco.berkeley.edu/
        • 77. David Hyunh (Google) – Parallax browser www.freebase.com/labs/parallax/
        • 78. Christina Scheutz (Serials Solutions) – AquaBrowser © aqua.queenslibrary.org/
        • 79. Ian Davis (Talis) – LinkSailor linksailor.com