G h R i dGraph Representation and
Traversals
Deepak John
Department Of Computer Applications, SJCET-Pala
Graph terminology - overviewp gy
 A graph consists of
t f ti V { }◦ set of vertices V = {v1, v2, ….. vn}
◦ set of edges t...
Graph representation – undirectedp p
h Adj li Adj igraph Adjacency list Adjacency matrix
Graph representation – directed
D...
Adjacency Lists RepresentationAdjacency Lists Representation
 A graph of n nodes is represented by a one-dimensional arra...
Pros and Cons of Adjacency Matrices
 P Pros:
 Simple to implement
 Easy and fast to tell if a pair (i,j) is an edge: s...
Graph Traversal TechniquesGraph Traversal Techniques
 There are two standard graph traversal techniques:
 Depth First Se...
Depth-First SearchDepth-First Search
 DFS follows the following rules:
S l t i it d d i it it d t t th t1. Select an unvi...
• It searches ‘deeper’ the graph when possible.
• Starts at the selected node and explores as far as possible alongStarts ...
 Depth-first search: Strategy (for digraph)
 choose a starting vertex, distance d = 0
 vertices are visited in order of...
DFS(G)
1 for each vertex u ∈ V [G]
2 d l [ ] WHITE // l ll ti hit t th i t NIL2 do color[u] ← WHITE // color all vertices ...
 forward edges- which point from a node of the tree to one of its
descendants
 back edges-which point from a node to one...
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Depth first search - analysisDepth first search analysis
 Lines 1-3, initialization take time Θ(V).
 Lines 5-7 take time...
Breadth-First SearchBreadth First Search
 BFS follows the following rules:
1 Select an unvisited node x visit it have it ...
Breadth first search conceptsBreadth first search - concepts
• To keep track of progress, it colors each vertex - white, g...
 Breadth-first search: Strategy (for digraph)
 choose a starting vertex, distance d = 0g ,
 vertices are visited in ord...
BFS - algorithm
BFS(G, s) // G is the graph and s is the starting node
1 for each vertex u ∈ V [G] - {s}
2 do color[u] ← W...
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Breadth first search - analysis
•The while-loop in breadth-first search is executed at most |V|
times. The reason is that ...
STRONGLY CONNECTED COMPONENTS OF A
DIRECTED GRAPHDIRECTED GRAPH
 A directed graph is called strongly connected if there i...
PropertiesProperties
 Reflexive property: For all a, a # a. Any vertex is strongly
connected to itself, by definition., y...
Algorithm to Find Strongly Connected ComponentAlgorithm to Find Strongly Connected Component
 Strategy:
Phase 1:
 A stan...
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Bi-connected components of an Undirected graph
 Biconnected graph:
 A connected undirected graph G is said to
b bi t d i...
Discovery of Biconnected Components via
Articulation PointsArticulation Points
If we can find articulation points then ca...
Bi-connected components,
 Undirected graph
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
biconnected components
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
WHAT IS BINARY RELATION
 A binary relation R from the set S to the set T is a subset
of S×T, R S×T. If S = T, we say that...
Transitive closure of a graphTransitive closure of a graph
The problem: Given a directed graph, G = (V, E), find all of th...
 Consider the following adjacency matrix on the left representing a
directed graph, the transitive closure is given on th...
Strategy for Transitive ClosureStrategy for Transitive Closure
 We noted earlier that if there is an path from a to b and...
It implies the following rules for generating R(k) from R(k-1):
RR((kk))[[i ji j]] == RR((kk--11))[[i ji j]] oror ((RR((kk...
Warshall’s Algorithmg
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
 It should be obvious that the complexity is O(n3) because of the 3
nested for-loops.
 The result is an NxN matrix where...
Warshall’s Algorithm (example)
3
1
3
1
3
1
42
0 0 1 0
42 42
0 0 1 0
1 0 0 1
0 0 0 0R(0) =
0 0 1 0
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0R(1) =
0 ...
All-Pairs Shortest PathsAll Pairs Shortest Paths
 Given a weighted graph G(V,E,w), the all-pairs shortest paths
problem i...
Time efficiency: Θ(n3)
Space efficiency: Matrices can be written over their predecessors
Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE P...
Floyd’s Algorithm (example)
0 ∞ 3 ∞
2 0
0 ∞ 3 ∞
2 0 5
21 2
2 0 ∞ ∞
∞ 7 0 1
6 ∞ ∞ 0
D(0) =
2 0 5 ∞
∞ 7 0 1
6 ∞ 9 0
D(1) =
3...
Dynamic Programmingy g g
 Dynamic Programming is an algorithm design technique for
optimization problems: often minimizin...
Steps in Dynamic Programming
1 Characterize structure of an optimal solution1. Characterize structure of an optimal soluti...
Optimal Binary Search TreesOptimal Binary Search Trees
 OBST is one special kind of advanced tree.
 It focus on how to r...
 Problem
 Given sequence K = k1 < k2 <··· < kn of n sorted keys, with aq 1 2 n y ,
search probability pi for each key ki...
 Consider 5 keys with these search probabilities:
p1 = 0.25, p2 = 0.2, p3 = 0.05, p4 = 0.2, p5 = 0.3.
k2 i depthT(ki) dep...
 p1 = 0.25, p2 = 0.2, p3 = 0.05, p4 = 0.2, p5 = 0.3.
i depthT(ki) depthT(ki)·pi
1 1 0.25
2 0 0
k2
2 0 0
3 3 0.15
4 2 0.4
...
Optimal Substructure
 Any sub tree of a BST contains keys in a contiguous range ki,
..., kj Tj T
T’
 If T is an optimal ...
Pseudo-code
OPTIMAL-BST(p, q, n)OPTIMAL-BST(p, q, n)(p q )
1. for i ← 1 to n + 1
2. do e[i, i 1] ← 0
3. w[i, i 1] ← 0
(p...
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Analysis and design of algorithms part 3

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Graphs and graph traversals. Strongly connected components of a Directed graph. Biconnected components of an undirected graph.
Transitive closure of a Binary relation. Warshalls algorithm for Transitive closure. All pair shortest path in graphs. Dynamic programming. Constructing optimal binary search trees.

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Analysis and design of algorithms part 3

  1. 1. G h R i dGraph Representation and Traversals Deepak John Department Of Computer Applications, SJCET-Pala
  2. 2. Graph terminology - overviewp gy  A graph consists of t f ti V { }◦ set of vertices V = {v1, v2, ….. vn} ◦ set of edges that connect the vertices E ={e1, e2, …. em}  Two vertices in a graph are adjacent if there is an edgeg p j g connecting the vertices.  Two vertices are on a path if there is a sequences of vertices beginning with the first one and ending with the second onebeginning with the first one and ending with the second one  Graphs with ordered edges are directed. For directed graphs, vertices have in and out degrees. W i h d G h h l i d i h d Weighted Graphs have values associated with edges. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  3. 3. Graph representation – undirectedp p h Adj li Adj igraph Adjacency list Adjacency matrix Graph representation – directed Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar graph Adjacency list Adjacency matrix
  4. 4. Adjacency Lists RepresentationAdjacency Lists Representation  A graph of n nodes is represented by a one-dimensional array L of linked lists, where,  L[i] is the linked list containing all the nodes adjacent from node i.  The nodes in the list L[i] are in no particular order Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  5. 5. Pros and Cons of Adjacency Matrices  P Pros:  Simple to implement  Easy and fast to tell if a pair (i,j) is an edge: simply check ify p ( ,j) g p y A[i][j] is 1 or 0  Cons:  No matter how few edges the graph has the matrix takes O(n2) No matter how few edges the graph has, the matrix takes O(n2) in memory Pros and Cons of Adjacency Lists  Pros:  Saves on space (memory): the representation takes as many memory words as there are nodes and edge.memory words as there are nodes and edge.  Cons:  It can take up to O(n) time to determine if a pair of nodes (i,j) is d ld h t h th li k d li t L[i] hi h Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar an edge: one would have to search the linked list L[i], which takes time proportional to the length of L[i].
  6. 6. Graph Traversal TechniquesGraph Traversal Techniques  There are two standard graph traversal techniques:  Depth First Search (DFS) Depth-First Search (DFS)  Breadth-First Search (BFS)  In both DFS and BFS, the nodes of the undirected graph are, g p visited in a systematic manner so that every node is visited exactly one.  Both BFS and DFS give rise to a tree: Both BFS and DFS give rise to a tree:  When a node x is visited, it is labeled as visited, and it is added to the tree If h l d f d i i d h If the traversal got to node x from node y, y is viewed as the parent of x, and x a child of y Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  7. 7. Depth-First SearchDepth-First Search  DFS follows the following rules: S l t i it d d i it it d t t th t1. Select an unvisited node x, visit it, and treat as the current node 2. Find an unvisited neighbor of the current node, visit it, andg make it the new current node; 3. If the current node has no unvisited neighbors, backtrack to the its parent and make that parent the new current node;the its parent, and make that parent the new current node; 4. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until no more nodes can be visited. 5. If there are still unvisited nodes, repeat from step 1. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  8. 8. • It searches ‘deeper’ the graph when possible. • Starts at the selected node and explores as far as possible alongStarts at the selected node and explores as far as possible along each branch before backtracking. • Vertices go through white, gray and black stages of color. Whit i iti ll– White – initially – Gray – when discovered first – Black – when finished i.e. the adjacency list of the vertex isBlack when finished i.e. the adjacency list of the vertex is completely examined. • Also records timestamps for each vertex d[ ] h th t i fi t di d– d[v]when the vertex is first discovered – f[v] when the vertex is finished Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  9. 9.  Depth-first search: Strategy (for digraph)  choose a starting vertex, distance d = 0  vertices are visited in order of increasing distance from the starting vertex,  examine One edges leading from vertices (at distance d) to examine One edges leading from vertices (at distance d) to adjacent vertices (at distance d+1)  then, examine One edges leading from vertices at distance d+1 to distance d+2, and so on,  until no new vertex is discovered, or dead end  then backtrack one distance back up and try other edges and so then, backtrack one distance back up, and try other edges, and so on  until finally backtrack to starting vertex, with no more new vertex Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar to be discovered.
  10. 10. DFS(G) 1 for each vertex u ∈ V [G] 2 d l [ ] WHITE // l ll ti hit t th i t NIL2 do color[u] ← WHITE // color all vertices white, set their parents NIL 3 π[u] ← NIL 4 time ← 0 // zero out time 5 for each vertex u ∈ V [G] // call only for unexplored vertices5 for each vertex u ∈ V [G] // call only for unexplored vertices 6 do if color[u] = WHITE // this may result in multiple sources 7 then DFS-VISIT(u) DFS-VISIT(u) 1 color[u] ← GRAY ▹White vertex u has just been discovered. 2 time ← time +12 time ← time +1 3 d[u] time // record the discovery time 4 for each v ∈ Adj[u] ▹Explore edge(u, v). 5 do if color[v] = WHITE5 do if color[v] WHITE 6 then π[v] ← u // set the parent value 7 DFS-VISIT(v) // recursive call 8 color[u] BLACK ▹ Blacken u; it is finished Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar 8 color[u] BLACK Blacken u; it is finished. 9 f [u] ▹ time ← time +1
  11. 11.  forward edges- which point from a node of the tree to one of its descendants  back edges-which point from a node to one of its ancestors  cross edges, is any other edge in graph G. It connects vertices in two different DFS-tree or two vertices in the same DFS-tree neither of which is the ancestor of the other.  tree edges edges which belong to the spanning tree itself are tree edges, edges which belong to the spanning tree itself, are classified separately from forward edges Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  12. 12. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  13. 13. Depth first search - analysisDepth first search analysis  Lines 1-3, initialization take time Θ(V).  Lines 5-7 take time Θ(V), excluding the time to call the DFS- VISITVISIT.  DFS-VISIT is called only once for each node (since it’s called only for white nodes and the first step in it is to paint the node )gray).  Loop on line 4-7 is executed |Adj(v)| times. Since, ∑vєV |Adj(v)| = Ө (E), the total cost of DFS-VISIT it θ(E) Th t t l t f DFS i θ(V+E)The total cost of DFS is θ(V+E) Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  14. 14. Breadth-First SearchBreadth First Search  BFS follows the following rules: 1 Select an unvisited node x visit it have it be the root in a BFS1. Select an unvisited node x, visit it, have it be the root in a BFS tree being formed. Its level is called the current level. 2. From each node z in the current level, in the order in which the level nodes were visited, visit all the unvisited neighbors of z. The newly visited nodes from this level form a new level that becomes the next current level. 3. Repeat step 2 until no more nodes can be visited. 4. If there are still unvisited nodes, repeat from Step 1. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  15. 15. Breadth first search conceptsBreadth first search - concepts • To keep track of progress, it colors each vertex - white, gray or blackblack. • All vertices start white. • A vertex discovered first time during the search becomes hinonwhite. • All vertices adjacent to black ones are discovered. Whereas, gray ones may have some white adjacent vertices.y j • Gray represent the frontier between discovered and undiscovered vertices. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  16. 16.  Breadth-first search: Strategy (for digraph)  choose a starting vertex, distance d = 0g ,  vertices are visited in order of increasing distance from the starting vertex,  examine all edges leading from vertices (at distance d) to examine all edges leading from vertices (at distance d) to adjacent vertices (at distance d+1)  then, examine all edges leading from vertices at distance d+1 t di t d+2 dto distance d+2, and so on,  until no new vertex is discovered  The predecessor of u is stored in the variable π[u]. The predecessor of u is stored in the variable π[u]. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  17. 17. BFS - algorithm BFS(G, s) // G is the graph and s is the starting node 1 for each vertex u ∈ V [G] - {s} 2 do color[u] ← WHITE // color of vertex u[ ] 3 d[u] ← ∞ // distance from source s to vertex u 4 π[u] ← NIL // predecessor of u 5 color[s] ← GRAY 6 d[ ] 06 d[s] ← 0 7 π[s] ← NIL 8 Q ← Ø // Q is a FIFO - queue 9 ENQUEUE(Q, s)Q (Q, ) 10 while Q ≠ Ø // iterates as long as there are gray vertices. Lines 10-18 11 do u ← DEQUEUE(Q) 12 for each v ∈ Adj[u] 13 d if l [ ] WHITE // di h di d dj i13 do if color[v] = WHITE // discover the undiscovered adjacent vertices 14 then color[v] ← GRAY // enqueued whenever painted gray 15 d[v] ← d[u] + 1 16 π[v] ← u Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar 16 π[v] u 17 ENQUEUE(Q, v) 18 color[u] ← BLACK // painted black whenever dequeued
  18. 18. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  19. 19. Breadth first search - analysis •The while-loop in breadth-first search is executed at most |V| times. The reason is that every vertex enqueued at most once. So,y q , we have O(V). •The for-loop inside the while-loop is executed at most |E| times if G is a directed graph or 2|E| times if G is undirected Theif G is a directed graph or 2|E| times if G is undirected. The reason is that every vertex dequeued at most once and we examine (u, v) only when u is dequeued. Therefore, every edge i d if di d i if di dexamined at most once if directed, at most twice if undirected. So, we have O(E). •Therefore, the total running time for breadth-first search, g traversal is O(V + E). Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  20. 20. STRONGLY CONNECTED COMPONENTS OF A DIRECTED GRAPHDIRECTED GRAPH  A directed graph is called strongly connected if there is a path from each vertex in the graph to every other vertex.  The strongly connected components of a directed graph G are its maximal strongly connected sub graphs. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar Graph with strongly connected components marked
  21. 21. PropertiesProperties  Reflexive property: For all a, a # a. Any vertex is strongly connected to itself, by definition., y  Symmetric property: If a # b, then b # a. For strong connectivity, this follows from the symmetry of the definition. The same two th ( f t b d th f b t ) th t h th tpaths (one from a to b and another from b to a) that show that a ~ b, looked at in the other order (one from b to a and another from a to b) show that b ~ a.  Transitive property: If a # b and b # c, then a # c. Let's expand this out for strong connectivity: if a ~ b and b ~ c, we have four paths: a b b a b c and c b Concatenating them in pairs a b cpaths: a-b, b-a, b-c, and c-b. Concatenating them in pairs a-b-c and c-b-a produces two paths connecting a-c and c-a, so a ~ c, showing that the transitive property holds for strong connectivity. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  22. 22. Algorithm to Find Strongly Connected ComponentAlgorithm to Find Strongly Connected Component  Strategy: Phase 1:  A standard depth-first search on G is performed, and the vertices are put in a stack at their finishing times Ph 2Phase 2:  A depth-first search is performed on GT, the transpose graph.  To start a search vertices are popped off the stack To start a search, vertices are popped off the stack.  A strongly connected component in the graph is identified by the name of its starting vertex (call leader). Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  23. 23. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  24. 24. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  25. 25. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  26. 26. Bi-connected components of an Undirected graph  Biconnected graph:  A connected undirected graph G is said to b bi t d if it i t dbe biconnected if it remains connected after removal of any one vertex and the edges that are incident upon that vertex.  Bi t d t Biconnected component:  A biconnected component of a undirected graph is a maximal biconnected subgraph, that is a biconnected s bgraph notthat is, a biconnected subgraph not contained in any larger biconnected subgraph. Artic lation point:Artic lation points are theArticulation point:Articulation points are the points where the graph can be broken down into its biconnected components  C is an articulation point C is an articulation point Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  27. 27. Discovery of Biconnected Components via Articulation PointsArticulation Points If we can find articulation points then can compute biconnected components. Idea: • During DFS, use stack to store visited edges. E h ti l t th DFS f t hild f ti l ti• Each time we complete the DFS of a tree child of an articulation point, pop all stacked edges currently in stack • These popped off edges form a biconnected component.p pp g p Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  28. 28. Bi-connected components,  Undirected graph Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar biconnected components
  29. 29. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  30. 30. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  31. 31. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  32. 32. WHAT IS BINARY RELATION  A binary relation R from the set S to the set T is a subset of S×T, R S×T. If S = T, we say that the relation is a binary l i Srelation on S.  P ti f Bi R l ti Properties of Binary Relation Let R be a binary relation on S.Then R is 1 Reflexive1. Reflexive 2. Symmetric 3 Anti-symmetric3. Anti-symmetric 4. Transitive Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  33. 33. Transitive closure of a graphTransitive closure of a graph The problem: Given a directed graph, G = (V, E), find all of the i h bl f i i Vvertices reachable from a given starting vertex v ϵV. Transitive closure (definition): Let G = (V E) be a graph where x RTransitive closure (definition): Let G = (V, E) be a graph, where x R y, y R z (x, y, z ϵ V). Then we can add a new edge x R z. A graph containing all of the edges of this nature is called the transitive closure of the original graph. The best way to represent the transitive closure graph (TCG) is byThe best way to represent the transitive closure graph (TCG) is by means of an adjacency matrix. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  34. 34.  Consider the following adjacency matrix on the left representing a directed graph, the transitive closure is given on the right illustratingg p , g g g which vertices can reach other vertices •there is an edge from a to b and e b d b d•there is an edge from a to b and e. •b can reach d •d can reach c h ll i a b c d e a b c d e a 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 b 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 •a can reach all vertices. •But b cannot reach a c 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 d 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 e 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1e 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  35. 35. Strategy for Transitive ClosureStrategy for Transitive Closure  We noted earlier that if there is an path from a to b and from b to c, then there is a path from a to c  Our strategy for deriving a transitive closure matrix will be based on this simple idea  Start with a, compare it against each other vertex and see if there is, p g an edge  if so, the corresponding matrix value is true  if not see if there is already a path known from some vertex c to if not, see if there is already a path known from some vertex c to b and an edge from a to b, if so, then we know that there is a path from a to b Thi ill i th f 3 t d f l f th t ti This will require the use of 3 nested for-loops, one for the starting vertex of a path, one for the destination vertex of a path, and one to see if a path already exists from start to this point and from this i d i i Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar point to destination
  36. 36. It implies the following rules for generating R(k) from R(k-1): RR((kk))[[i ji j]] == RR((kk--11))[[i ji j]] oror ((RR((kk--11))[[i ki k]] andand RR((kk--11))[[k jk j])])RR(( ))[[i,ji,j]] RR(( ))[[i,ji,j]] oror ((RR(( ))[[i,ki,k]] andand RR(( ))[[k,jk,j])])  Rule 1 If an element in row i and column j is 1 in R(k-1),it remains 1 in R(k)  Rule 2 If an element in row i and column j is 0 in R(k-1), it has to be changed to 1 in R(k) if and only if the element in its row i and columnchanged to 1 in R(k) if and only if the element in its row i and column k and the element in its column j and row k are both 1’s in R(k-1)  Constructs transitive closure T as the last matrix in the sequence of n-by-n matrices R(0), … , R(k), … , R(n)  Note that R(0) = A (adjacency matrix), R(n) = T (transitive closure) Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  37. 37. Warshall’s Algorithmg Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  38. 38.  It should be obvious that the complexity is O(n3) because of the 3 nested for-loops.  The result is an NxN matrix where entry R[i, j] is true if there is a path from vertex i to vertex j.  The algorithm will work on either undirected or directed The algorithm will work on either undirected or directed graphs
  39. 39. Warshall’s Algorithm (example) 3 1 3 1 3 1 42 0 0 1 0 42 42 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0R(0) = 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0R(1) = 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0R(2) = 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 33 4 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 42 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 42 Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 R(3) = 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 R(4) =
  40. 40. All-Pairs Shortest PathsAll Pairs Shortest Paths  Given a weighted graph G(V,E,w), the all-pairs shortest paths problem is to find the shortest paths between all pairs of vertices vi, vj ∈ V.  A number of algorithms are known for solving this problem A number of algorithms are known for solving this problem. FLOYD’S ALGORITHM: ALL PAIRS SHORTEST PATHSFLOYD’S ALGORITHM: ALL PAIRS SHORTEST PATHS Problem: In a weighted (di)graph, find shortest paths between every pair of vertices Same idea: construct solution through series of matrices D(0), …,D (n) Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  41. 41. Time efficiency: Θ(n3) Space efficiency: Matrices can be written over their predecessors Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar Space efficiency: Matrices can be written over their predecessors
  42. 42. Floyd’s Algorithm (example) 0 ∞ 3 ∞ 2 0 0 ∞ 3 ∞ 2 0 5 21 2 2 0 ∞ ∞ ∞ 7 0 1 6 ∞ ∞ 0 D(0) = 2 0 5 ∞ ∞ 7 0 1 6 ∞ 9 0 D(1) = 3 1 3 6 7 4 0 3 0 10 3 4 0 10 3 4 1 0 ∞ 3 ∞ 2 0 5 ∞ 9 7 0 1D(2) = 0 10 3 4 2 0 5 6 9 7 0 1D(3) = 0 10 3 4 2 0 5 6 7 7 0 1D(4) = 6 ∞ 9 0 6 16 9 0 6 16 9 0 Deepak John, Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  43. 43. Dynamic Programmingy g g  Dynamic Programming is an algorithm design technique for optimization problems: often minimizing or maximizing.p p g g  Like divide and conquer, DP solves problems by combining solutions to sub problems. U lik di id d b bl t i d d t Unlike divide and conquer, sub problems are not independent.  Sub problems may share subsubproblems,  However, solution to one sub problem may not affect the solutions to other sub bl f h blproblems of the same problem.  DP reduces computation by  Solving sub problems in a bottom-up fashion.g p p  Storing solution to a sub problem the first time it is solved.  Looking up the solution when sub problem is encountered again.  Key: determine structure of optimal solutions Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar  Key: determine structure of optimal solutions
  44. 44. Steps in Dynamic Programming 1 Characterize structure of an optimal solution1. Characterize structure of an optimal solution. 2. Define value of optimal solution recursively. 3. Compute optimal solution valuesp p 4. Construct an optimal solution from computed values. Elements of Dynamic Programming  Optimal substructure  Overlapping subproblems Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  45. 45. Optimal Binary Search TreesOptimal Binary Search Trees  OBST is one special kind of advanced tree.  It focus on how to reduce the cost of the search of the BST It focus on how to reduce the cost of the search of the BST.  A good example of a dynamic algorithm • Solves all the small problems ild l i l bl f h• Builds solutions to larger problems from them • Requires space to store small problem results Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  46. 46.  Problem  Given sequence K = k1 < k2 <··· < kn of n sorted keys, with aq 1 2 n y , search probability pi for each key ki.  Want to build a binary search tree (BST) with minimum expected search costwith minimum expected search cost.  Actual cost = number of items examined.  For key ki, cost = depthT(ki)+1, where For key ki, cost depthT(ki) 1, where depthT(ki) = depth of ki in BST T . TE ]incostsearch[   n i iiT pk TE 1 )(depth1 ]incostsearch[ i 1
  47. 47.  Consider 5 keys with these search probabilities: p1 = 0.25, p2 = 0.2, p3 = 0.05, p4 = 0.2, p5 = 0.3. k2 i depthT(ki) depthT(ki)·pi 1 1 0 25 k1 k4 1 1 0.25 2 0 0 3 2 0.1 4 1 0 2 k3 k5 4 1 0.2 5 2 0.6 1.15 k3 k5 Therefore, [search cost] = 2.15. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar
  48. 48.  p1 = 0.25, p2 = 0.2, p3 = 0.05, p4 = 0.2, p5 = 0.3. i depthT(ki) depthT(ki)·pi 1 1 0.25 2 0 0 k2 2 0 0 3 3 0.15 4 2 0.4 5 1 0 3 k1 k5 5 1 0.3 1.10 k4 Therefore, E[search cost] = 2.10. k3 This tree turns out to be optimal for this set of keys Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar 3 This tree turns out to be optimal for this set of keys.
  49. 49. Optimal Substructure  Any sub tree of a BST contains keys in a contiguous range ki, ..., kj Tj T T’  If T is an optimal BST and T contains sub tree T’ with keys ki, ... ,kj , then T’must be an optimal BST for keys ki, ..., kj. Deepak John,Department Of IT,CE Poonjar , j , p y i, , j 1
  50. 50. Pseudo-code OPTIMAL-BST(p, q, n)OPTIMAL-BST(p, q, n)(p q ) 1. for i ← 1 to n + 1 2. do e[i, i 1] ← 0 3. w[i, i 1] ← 0 (p q ) 1. for i ← 1 to n + 1 2. do e[i, i 1] ← 0 3. w[i, i 1] ← 0 4. for l ← 1 to n 5. do for i ← 1 to nl + 1 6. do j ←i + l1 4. for l ← 1 to n 5. do for i ← 1 to nl + 1 6. do j ←i + l1 7. e[i, j ]←∞ 8. w[i, j ] ← w[i, j1] + pj 9. for r ←i to j 7. e[i, j ]←∞ 8. w[i, j ] ← w[i, j1] + pj 9. for r ←i to j 10. do t ← e[i, r1] + e[r + 1, j ] + w[i, j ] 11. if t < e[i, j ] 12. then e[i, j ] ← t 10. do t ← e[i, r1] + e[r + 1, j ] + w[i, j ] 11. if t < e[i, j ] 12. then e[i, j ] ← t 13. root[i, j ] ←r 14. return e and root 13. root[i, j ] ←r 14. return e and root

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