Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Ysi2005 Report By Idris Jassim Al Oboudi & Keith Fulthorp,990 1991 Idris Info To New Zealand  Australia Parks And Recreation, ادريس جاسم العبودي
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ysi2005 Report By Idris Jassim Al Oboudi & Keith Fulthorp,990 1991 Idris Info To New Zealand Australia Parks And Recreation, ادريس جاسم العبودي

2,064

Published on

California Park & Recreation Society …

California Park & Recreation Society
Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative

“We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life”


By

Mr. Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi
ادريس جاسم العبودي

Mr. Keith Fulthorp

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,064
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. California Park & Recreation Society Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” By Mr. Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi Mr. Keith Fulthorp “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 1
  • 2. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Acknowledgements Many thanks to all the individuals and organizations that helped contribute to the California Park and Recreation Society’s Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative report. Your support and resources have contributed to the success of this document, and to the new vision for youth sports in California, and together, “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life!” Special thanks to Lisa Licata, Vice President, National Alliance for Youth Sports for all the support, resources, and trainings provided to the CPRS/NAYS Youth Sports and fitness taskforce. The National Alliance for Youth Sports and it’s staff have provided the bulk of the information presented in this report, specifically the Recommendations for Communities and the National Standards for Youth Sports. California Park and Recreation Society Youth Sports Taskforce Members: • Idris Al-Oboudi, Taskforce Chairman, Recreation Services Manager, City of Manhattan Beach • Jane H. Adams, Executive Director, California Recreation & Park Society • Lisa Licata, Vice President, National Alliance for Youth Sports • Mark Leyman, Recreation Services Manager, City of Manhattan Beach • Daniel Jassim, Recreation Supervisor, City of Culver City • Emanuel Escobar, LA County Parks and Recreation • Ellen O’Sullivan, Ph.D., Leisure Lifestyle Consulting • Keith Fulthorp, M.S. Redondo Union High School • Cameron Harding, Recreation Supervisor, City of Manhattan Beach Organizations: National Alliance for Youth Sports National Recreation and Park Association California Recreation and Park Society Leisure Lifestyle Consulting Oregon Recreation and Park Association We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 2
  • 3. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Table of Contents Topic Page Introduction 4 CPRS Goals for Youth Sports in California 5 CPRS Youth Sports Initiative Framework 6 Core Values 7 Vision 13 Mission 13 Trends and Opportunities 15 Core Competencies 15 Strategies 15 Performance Measures 16 Implementing the Youth Sports Initiative 17 National Alliance for Youth Sports Programs and Services 17 Community Recommendations 21 Implementing the Youth Sports Initiative, What’s in it for you? 24 What’s in it for your community? 24 What’s in it for your organization? 24 What’s in it for your parents and coaches? 25 Conclusion 25 Appendix 26 Minimum Standards for Youth Sports in California 27 Implementation Checklist 31 Example Forms 32 Rights and Responsibilities in Youth Sports 41 We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 3
  • 4. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative California Park & Recreation Society Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Introduction Increasingly, news reports across California include reports of incidents surrounding youth sports. Whether it’s an argument between parent spectators, parents and coaches, coaches and parents, coaches and officials, youth participants and any combination of parents, coaches, officials and other participants, the message is clear: Parks and recreation departments and youth sports agencies in California are plagued with unpleasant youth sports experiences, reports of violence, and in 2005 one alleged argument that resulted in a fatality. While many parks and recreation professionals may agree there are many challenges facing youth sports today, few have a unified vision of how to create positive sports environments for youth. To gauge California Park & Recreation Society’s members understanding of the problem, CPRS conducted a youth sports survey in 2003. According to the survey results, the top issues youth sports administrators reported struggling with included: parental misbehavior; conflict management; alternatives for teens and pre- teens; volunteer recruitment, background checks and training; redefining winning; and youth participant misbehavior. In an effort to address the top five issues as reported respondents to the 2003 survey, CPRS began exploring options for creating a more positive youth sports climate in California, which has led to the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative (YSFI). The initiative mimics the CPRS VIP plan, aligning a new framework that specifically targets youth sports and fitness issues within communities. The resulting vision “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” directly supports the VIP vision “We create community and quality of life through people, parks and programs.” CPRS, in partnership with the National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS), created the Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative with the intention of developing a model plan for implementing three key community recommendations identified by NAYS and the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) in a 2001 report titled Recommendations for Communities: Raising community standards in children’s sports. The report can be obtained by contacting CPRS or NAYS, and begins with an overview of children’s sports in the United States. It examines the purpose of youth sports, takes a look at how they are structured in today’s society, and explains the valuable role they play in a child’s physical and psychological development. It then overviews problems and issues affecting youth sports, identifies primary factors are behind these problems, and what steps can be taken to change the culture of children’s sports. The document concludes with the recommendations for Communities and suggestions for implementing them in a community. The recommendations include: 1. Adopting a community philosophy that makes youth sports safe and positive for children. 2. Appointing a professional youth sports administrator to ensure adherence to the philosophy. 3. Holding everyone associated with the program accountable for their behavior. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 4
  • 5. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative The objectives of the CRPS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative are to: Create a clear vision and programming framework for positively impacting the culture of youth sports in California; to help youth sports agencies implement the three NAYS recommendations; to connect players, parents, coaches, officials and league with vital training resources and current youth sports related information offered through NAYS. CPRS overall goals for youth sports in California: 1. For California's youth to participate in organized sports activities that embody the standards for youth sports as articulated in the “Recommendations for Raising Community Standards” report. 2. To encourage California's youth in the development of a lifetime association with physical activity, healthy lifestyles, and individual fitness. 3. To ensure that California's youth sports programs that are supported by local tax dollars are planned so that they are open to all children, regardless of race, creed, sex, economic status or ability; and that financial assistance shall be found for those unable to afford to participate. The philosophy of the CPRS & NAYS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative is to partner and collaborate with statewide cities and youth sports organizations to provide a positive, self- esteem character building youth sports environment. To create a culture where honoring the game, respecting one’s self, teammates, coaches, officials, opponents, parents and fans is the norm, not the exception. Ultimately, the purpose if the YSFI is to help agencies in California implement these community recommendations, communicating our common vision: "We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life" “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 5
  • 6. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 6
  • 7. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 7
  • 8. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative YSFI Framework Overview The CPRS Youth Sports Initiative includes a framework aligned with the CPRS Vision, Insight, and Planning (VIP) framework to help guide the implementation of the recommendations for communities as well as to provide vision and direction for youth sports professionals. Each section presented here is intended to serve as recommendations for improving the culture of youth sports within any program, organization, or community. Core Values The National Standards for Youth Sports, developed through the National Alliance for Youth Sports serve as the recommended core values for all youth sports programs within a community. These standards tie directly into the CPRS Youth Sports Taskforce’s vision statement “We create positive sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life!” The National Standards for Youth Sports were developed by Forty-eight of the nation’s leading experts representing a vast variety of disciplines affecting youth sports from academic institutions to grass root organizations who assembled in Washington D.C. Their goal was to develop standards that all parents should follow in developing and administering youth sports for children. The faculty studied the role of the parent in youth sports from the educational, physical, emotional and social aspect of youth sport involvement. While sport for children is generally a positive experience, too often, history has shown that youth leagues have been created with an atmosphere of professionalism, e.g. the vicarious parent, the overzealous coach, leagues organized with championships as their main focus continue to exist. The National Standards for Youth Sports were developed to provide all youth groups with a focus on what is best for children in their growing, learning years. The National Standards for Youth Sports place in motion a national policy for children’s sports. With leagues initiating the implementation of these Standards, parents can feel confident that youth sports will truly be a positive social experience for their child. CORE VALUE #1 PROPER SPORTS ENVIRONMENT Parents must consider and carefully choose the proper environment for their child, including the appropriate age and development for participation, the type of sport, the rules of the sport, the age range of the participants and the proper level of physical and emotional stress. Background: There are a wide variety of youth sports experiences available to children. Some of these begin as early as five years of age and include both collision and non-collision sports, elite and recreational play categories, single age and multi-age participation ranges and We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 8
  • 9. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative instructional to highly organized and competitive programs. Rationale: Because all children physically and emotionally mature at different rates, parents must evaluate very carefully their child’s youth sports experience. Implementation: • Leagues will establish a minimum play rule per game for all children regardless of ability. Leagues will establish a minimum play rule of a minimum of 25% of the game with 50% of the game being strongly recommended for all children regardless of ability • Leagues will organize programs within a two-year range, such as 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, etc. • Leagues will allow post-season play only for regular season teams and not engage in choosing post-season all-star teams. • Leagues will establish a policy for not cutting players and will provide an opportunity for meaningful play for all children. • If awards are given, leagues will give participation awards and reduce emphasis on competitive trophies. • League standings will not be used below the age of nine and will be de- emphasized below the age of thirteen by using techniques such as publishing only end-of-season results. CORE VALUE #2 PROGRAMS BASED ON THE WELL-BEING OF CHILDREN Parents must select youth sports programs that are developed and organized to enhance the emotional, physical, social and educational well being of children. Background: Many organized play experiences for children are carbon copies of adult-oriented programs. The rules, skill expectations and competitive requirements are the same as in high school, college and professional levels. Rationale: Youth sports programs should be based on maximum participation. The program should focus on organizing meaningful play. Coaches should let children be involved in making decisions. The level and length of athletic competition should be commensurate with the physical and emotional development of the child. Implementation: 1. Leagues will organize programs using the following guidelines: A. 5 to 6 Year Old - Developmental Program • No regular competitive teams • Scores and/or standings not kept • Rules, equipment, and field modified • Limit uniforms to T-shirt and hat • No scheduled leagues, tournament or all-star competition • Leagues and coaches not permitted to require sports specialization • Co-rec. play • No travel • Coaches permitted on playing surface B. 7 to 8 Year Old - Sports Introduction Program • Informal teams • Scores and standings not kept • Rules, equipment and fields modified • Limited uniforms • No tournament, post-season play or all-star competition • Co-rec. play encouraged • Travel within local community only We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 9
  • 10. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative • Coaches permitted on playing surface • Leagues and coaches not permitted to require sports specialization C. 9 to 10 Year Old - Organizational Program • Scores kept but standings de- emphasized • Rules, equipment, and fields modified where necessary • No out-of-community post season play • Travel within local community only • No national tournament participation • Leagues and coaches not permitted to require sports specialization D. 11 to 12 Year Old - Skill Enhancement Program • Reasonable uniform policy • Limited ability grouping used with proper grouping procedures • Encourage a variety of position and situational play 2. Coaches will be required not to teach the use of sports to punish opponents through physical contact or excessive score domination. 3. League or coaches must not require year-around participation. 4. Leagues must adopt rules banning rapid weight loss/gain procedures used solely for participation in youth sports. 5. Children below the age of 11 should participate in activities that contain limited collision potential and feature modified rules that will significantly reduce the chances of injury. 6. Leagues must consider weight and skill in grouping children. 7. Coaches must apply proper principles of conditioning and nutrition. CORE VALUE #3 DRUG, TOBACCO & ALCOHOL-FREE ENVIRONMENT Parents must encourage a drug, tobacco and alcohol-free environment for their children. Background: Pressures and opportunities for children to be involved in drug, tobacco and alcohol abuse has increased to crisis proportions during the past decades. Unsupervised social interaction and unknowledgeable adult leadership have contributed to the problem. Rationale: Coaches and parents must be educated about all drugs, including performance enhancement chemicals. Leagues should have policies dealing with drug, tobacco and steroid use and emphasizing prevention through education. Parents, league administrators, and coaches should be taught what to look for in abuse of these drugs and know how to access community resources for assistance on drug-related problems. Implementation: • Leagues will adopt rules prohibiting the use of alcohol, illegal substances or tobacco by coaches, league administrators or game officials at all youth sports events. • Leagues will provide coaches and parents educational information on identifying signs and symptoms for substance use by children. • Leagues will establish policy and implementation procedures for immediately dealing with substance use by coaches and players and communicate these policies to coaches, players, and parents. • Leagues will continually encourage dialogue between coaches, players and parents about the need for an alcohol, tobacco and drug-free environment for children. CORE VALUE #4 PART OF A CHILD’S LIFE We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 10
  • 11. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Parents must recognize that youth sports are only a small part of a child’s life. Background: The foundation for human development occurs during the early years of life. Individuals are exposed to many different learning situations to increase their potential for successful development. Rationale: Parents, coaches and league administrators need to encourage children to be involved in a variety of activities while recognizing that the home, church, school and a variety of other social experiences are all a part of a child’s growth and development. Parents must respect a child’s decision not to play. Coaches and parents must realize that youth sports involvement also has ramifications for the entire family. Parents should insist that youth sports participation not detract from the child’s academic progress. Implementation: • Leagues will adopt a policy that allows for and encourages participation in a variety of youth activities in addition to the child’s particular sport. • Leagues and coaches will not demand year-around involvement in a particular sport as a condition for meaningful participation. • Leagues will establish rules that limit organized practices to no more than 1 hour a day and three days a week through the age of 12 and not more than 1 1/2 hours and four days a week through the age of 16. • Leagues will adopt a policy that make provisions for excused absences through parental requests for church, school, and other family activities. CORE VALUE #5 TRAINING Parents must insist that coaches be trained and certified by a recognized program (recommend NAYS, PCA, ASETP, AYSO Safe Haven program for soccer) Background: Sports participation can lead to harm if those responsible have no training. In most cases, youth sports organizations allow volunteers to coach without performing any background check. Rationale: Parents should insist that coaches are educated in the following areas: psychological and emotional needs of children, safety and first aid, conditioning and nutrition, teaching proper sports techniques and drug awareness. Implementation: • Leagues will require that coaches be annually trained and certified in the areas of the emotional needs of children, safety and first aid, conditioning and nutrition, teaching proper sport techniques and drug and tobacco education. • League administrators and officials must also be trained in the aforementioned areas. • Leagues must use appropriate and available screening techniques for selecting and assigning coaches to ensure that children are protected from abuse. • Leagues are encouraged to provide additional educational resources for coaches to assist them in providing the best possible youth sports experience for each child. • All coaches must sign a code of ethics pledging their commitment to provide an enjoyable, healthful youth sports experience. Core Value #6 PARENTS’ ACTIVE ROLE Parents must make a serious effort to take an active role in the youth sports experience of their child providing positive support as a spectator, coach, league administrator and/or caring parent. Background: Many parents pass their youngsters over to others, relying on someone We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 11
  • 12. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative else to take responsibility for their child’s youth sports experience. Rationale: Parents are the keys. They need to demonstrate the positive benefits of a youth sports experience by attending games, practices, or team social events; or by just expressing their positive support. Parents should discuss with their child why the child is participating and help him/her in evaluating his/her experience. Implementation: • Parents will be required to attend a league orientation meeting. This may be one-on-one with a league official, if necessary. • Teams will be required to have a minimum of one team/parents’ meeting prior to each sports season. • Leagues will advertise parental involvement in roles such as coach, team manager, fund-raiser, league manager, special assistant, and fan. • Leagues will encourage parent-child communication about their youth sports experience through newsletters, team meetings, coach-parent and coach- player discussions, and league handbooks or guidelines. Core Value #7 POSITIVE ROLE MODELS Parents must be a positive role model exhibiting sportsmanlike behavior at games, practices, and home while giving positive reinforcement to their child and support to their child’s coaches. Background: Children will follow the example of the adult role model and in particular, the parent. Children will copy or imitate their parents’ sports behavior, including the development of values based on that behavior. Rationale: If the youth sports experience is to be a positive one for each child, parents must demonstrate sportsmanlike behavior as a fan, coach, and league administrator. They need to encourage fun, give lots of praise for the little successes along the way and, when a child makes a mistake, separate the mistake from the child. Parents need to encourage peer support and give positive verbal support to team members, opponents and coaches of their child. Implementation: • Leagues will develop a sportsmanship/conduct code including unacceptable behavior: • Berating players, coaches, officials • Use of vulgar language • Intoxication • Leagues will communicate conduct requirements to coaches, parents, players and spectators through newsletters, handbooks, posting, and announcements. • Leagues will develop an enforcement plan for implementing a sportsmanship code, including removal procedures. Core Value #8 PARENTAL COMMITMENT Parents must demonstrate their commitment to their child’s youth sports experience by annually signing a parental code of ethics. Background: Individuals that sign commitments are usually more positive and supportive of their children. Rationale: The parents should be knowledgeable of the opportunities and responsibilities for having their child involved in youth sports. They should also be requested to demonstrate their commitment by signing a code which outlines the opportunities their child should have through participation, as well as the responsibility the parent has in supporting the youth sports experience. Implementation: • Participation will not be allowed for parents or guardians who refuse to sign the parental code of ethics. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 12
  • 13. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Core Value #9 SAFE PLAYING SITUATIONS Parents must insist on safe playing facilities, healthful playing situations and proper first aid applications, should the need arise. Background: Children participating in youth sports are exposed to a variety of facilities, training programs and organized risk taking opportunities. Most adult leaders do not have coaching degrees or a university coaching certification. Rationale: Coaches and league administrators have the responsibility to inspect and insure proper maintenance of facilities; have knowledge of proper equipment fitting, selection and appropriate use; understand the physical consequence of improper skill techniques; have the ability to modify rules for safe-playing situations; understand the physical need for a proper child-oriented conditioning program; understand proper weight control practices and have knowledge of prevention and first aid for athletic injuries, including the ability to implement emergency procedures. Implementation: • Leagues will develop procedures for inspecting playing facilities for safety hazards before every youth sports activity. • Leagues will select equipment designed to ensure injury reduction for participants, (e.g. baseballs designed to reduce injuries, soccer shin guards, approved protective equipment in contact sports). • Leagues will be required to develop procedures for continual safety inspections of all playing equipment. • Leagues will ensure that teams have a fully equipped first aid kit at all youth sports activities. • Leagues will develop a plan for coaches on how to handle all emergencies at youth sports activities. • Leagues will establish procedures to ensure that all teams and events have an emergency first aid plan and equipment for dealing with injuries, hazards and weather conditions. • Leagues will not allow participation during unsafe conditions, such as lightening storms, darkness, playing sites in disrepair, etc. • Leagues will remove coaches that knowingly require or allow a player to play while having a serious injury or knowingly create unsafe play situations. • Leagues should require at least one coach per team regularly attending practices and games to take CPR and advanced first aid training Core Value #10 EQUAL PLAY OPPORTUNITY Parents, coaches, and league administrators must provide equal sports play opportunity for all youth regardless of race, creed, sex, economic status or ability. Background: The cost of participation in youth sports has risen dramatically during the past several years as have the number of single parent families. Although sports opportunities for girls and racial minorities have improved, many adults still fail to recognize the contribution of the youth sports experience for all children. Rationale: All children must have the opportunity to play regardless of race, creed, sex, economic status or ability. The coaches and league officials should recognize sex/role stereotyping and demand that racial prejudice of any type be prohibited. Every effort should be made to provide financial assistance to those youngsters unable to afford participation, including the cost of safe equipment. Adult youth sports leaders must teach a tolerance of, and respect for, people of all abilities, sizes, shapes, colors, cultural and economic backgrounds. Youth sports should be a growth, rather than a limiting, experience. Implementation: We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 13
  • 14. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative • Leagues must adopt a non- discrimination policy that ensures participation for all youngsters regardless of race, creed, sex, economic status or ability. • Leagues will make provisions so that all youngsters may be able to participate regardless of their financial ability to pay. • Leagues are encouraged to provide co- recreational programs through age 12. • Leagues will adopt an affirmative action coaching recruitment policy that will provide for the recruitment and selection of qualified women and minorities. Core Value #11 DRUG, TOBACCO & ALCOHOL-FREE ADULTS Parents as coaches, fans, and league administrators must be drug, tobacco and alcohol-free at youth sports activities. Background: Sports participation has long been characterized as a means of developing character and positive values. Recent information indicates that competitive pressures, negative sports peer group associations and unhealthy adult role models may actually increase the risk of drug, tobacco and alcohol use among youth participants. Rationale: Because of the influence they exert, parents involved in youth sports should understand that they must refrain from substance use, including smoking, alcohol consumption, chewing tobacco and illegal drugs at games, practices and other youth sports events. Healthful role modeling should lead the way in influencing youngsters to avoid drug, tobacco and alcohol use. Implementation: • Leagues will require coaches, league administrators and game officials to refrain from the use of alcohol, illegal substances and tobacco at youth sports events. • Leagues will require that alcohol will not be sold or allowed to be brought into youth sports games and practices. • Leagues will encourage spectators not to use tobacco at youth sports events. • Leagues will develop an enforcement plan for removing coaches, parents and spectators who are under the influence of alcohol or illegal substances. Vision These 11 core values tie directly into the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative vision: “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life.” Adopting this vision, and communicating it to participants, parents, coaches, and key community stakeholders helps professionalize youth sports organizations. Community members begin to gain a deeper understanding of the benefits of sports participation that extend beyond the obvious. Participants generally understand the physical and health related benefits of youth sports participation, and communicating the CPRS Youth Sports Initiative vision opens participants to the social and emotional benefits as well. While less publicized, these social/emotional benefits may even create more significant experiences for youth than physical benefits. The Vision of the CPRS Youth Sports Initiative connects with 8 recommended We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 14
  • 15. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative mission areas that will help change the culture of youth sports, as well as encompass the national standards. Mission Youth sports programs and organizations within communities implementing the CPRS Youth Sports Taskforce recommendations are encouraged to target these 8 mission areas and communicate how their programs and services are accomplishing their mission, vision, and standards. These eight mission areas are intended to help youth sports agencies focus their efforts in accomplishing the Initiative’s Vision, as well as put the CPRS VIP Vision and mission into action. These mission areas may also serve as public awareness statements that organizations can use in their marketing and promotional campaigns regarding the benefits and positive impacts of their services to their communities. Most importantly, these mission areas serve to guide youth sports agencies in the development of new and improved youth sports programs and services. Agencies can target specific mission areas through creating new or revitalizing old programs to address specific needs within a community. For example, a department may decide to target “improve youth fitness and nutrition” through providing participant before and after surveys that seek to identify levels of nutrition awareness before and after participation in a youth sports program, then communicating the results of the survey to community members. Youth sports organizations and programs create community and quality of life by creating positive sports experiences: • We provide recreation youth sports opportunities: Youth sports agencies, organizations and programs throughout California create opportunities for youth to engage in sports experiences through leagues, skill development classes, recreational tournaments and more. • We increase youth sports participation: through connecting with the changing needs of diverse communities and changing interests of youth within our communities; through offering a menu of sports activities; and by making sure participants have fun, meet new friends and learn new skills • We teach fair play and good sportsmanship: by encouraging participants, parents, coaches, and officials to adhere to standards of participation; by informing all of the rights and responsibilities in youth sports; and by holding individuals accountable for their behaviors when involved in youth sports activities • We facilitate player/parent/coach/official training and development: by requiring membership in NAYS programs and services we facilitate skills building clinics, coaching clinics, and parent participation clinics; provide access to on-line clinics through NAYS. These training are ongoing and up to date with new and improved techniques and We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 15
  • 16. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative resources to help insure positive sports experiences. • We improve youth fitness and nutrition: through; providing opportunities to participate in leagues, programs, and classes; encouraging healthy snacks at practices and events; providing access to health related information and services • We reduce obesity in youth: through engaging youth in positive experiences in recreational sports that encourage life long participation and active lifestyle choices. • We strengthen youth sports image and value to the community: by requiring training for coaches and officials; by mandating background checks for all coaches, officials and volunteers. • We support professional growth in youth sports leadership: by encouraging youth sports professionals to attend clinics and youth sports conferences; by presenting clinics and sessions at youth sports conferences; and by encouraging attendance NAYS annual trainings and workshops. Trends/Opportunities Youth sports organizations need to be aware of key trends and opportunities that exist within the venue of their communities. The National Alliance for Youth Sports updates resources so that youth sports professionals have access to important information that helps shape programs on a national, state, and local level. Understanding and forecasting trends within communities will help ensure that youth sports programs are meeting the ever changing needs of youth. Access to recent trends data provides strategic opportunities for organizations. For example, the Women’s Sports Foundation reports that girls are more likely than boys to drop out of sports by the age of 12. The California Center for Public Health and Advocacy reports that childhood obesity is at an all time high, even though youth sports participation has risen over past decade. Most importantly, NAYS reports that youth sports violence and negative youth sports experiences by participants, parents, coaches and officials is wide spread, and California is not unaffected. Recent incidents in 2005 have led the City of Manhattan Beach to pursue implementing the NAYS community recommendations with in their sports programs, and the tragic incident in Palmdale that resulted in a fatality still haunts youth sports agencies state wide. Seeking updated information from NAYS, NRPA, and CPRS provides youth sports agencies with unique opportunities to positively impact the climate and culture of sports programs within their communities. Turning these trends into opportunities requires youth sports professionals to become aware of specific resources and competencies they already have, and those that are still needed. Core Competencies Core Competencies are defined by CPRS as being special skills and abilities of recreation professionals. The CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative core competencies are those that specifically align with the VIP and are also specific to youth sports professionals. Connecting with the National Alliance for Youth Sports will help youth sports professionals develop the needed core competencies recommended by the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative. Some of the more immediate needed competencies relate to an agency wide understanding of the We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 16
  • 17. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative core values of the Initiative, the three NAYS community recommendations, and all the beneficial programs and services NAYS has to offer youth sports agencies in California. Strategies Strategies for developing these competencies, achieving the recommended mission areas, communicating the recommended vision and aligning youth sports programs in your community with the National Standards are adapted directly from the VIP framework. The CPRS Youth Sports Taskforce Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Framework provides a recommended outline for improving youth sports in communities within California. • Communicating the vision: Includes marketing the vision statement “We create positive sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life,” to both internal and external stakeholders, community members, players, coaches, parents, and officials. Adopt the recommended resolution and philosophy for youth sports in your community. • Forming Partnerships: Contact the National Alliance for Youth Sports, establish a NAYS chapter in your organization; partner with existing sports agencies and programs, and local school districts. • Expanding Professional Competencies: Attend youth sports conferences, utilize NAYS training opportunities; promote and facilitate clinics for coaches, officials and parents of your programs. • Strengthen the youth sports and fitness ethic: Require background checks for coaches and volunteers of your youth sports programs; hire well qualified coaches and officials; mandate training by a recognized organization for ALL coaches, league administrators, parents and officials; involve internal and external stakeholders. • D o c u m e n t ing results: develop, distribute, and analyze and interpret participant surveys; track participation increases/decreases; track facility use requests, maintenance needs, space allocation; injury reports, complaints, negative experiences, positive experiences; generate benefit based data: why and how are participants different because of your programs and services. • Documenting best practices: Implementing the 3 NAYS recommendations; implementing the National Standards for Youth Sports; documenting staff training efforts; facility use requirements, contracts, release forms, safety procedures, staff recruitment and selection.; design and document desired outcomes (see below) • Impacting public policy: Policy makers passing the recommended resolution, adopting the recommended youth sports philosophy; changing facility use requirements, permits, and fees. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 17
  • 18. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Performance Measures: Evaluating your organizations youth sports programs and events is an integral component of successfully impacting the culture of sports in your community. While some professionals may be wary of the task, effective program evaluation will help forecast important trends, help better meet customer expectations and needs, and help justify continued support of your programs by internal and external stakeholders both ideologically and financially. Specific performance measures or program evaluation criteria will vary depending upon the nature of the youth sports agency, as well as the level within the organization the individual has who is performing the evaluation. One key program evaluation outcome must be results based: why or how are participants different because of their participation in your program or service. Recommended and potential results based evaluative outcomes for community may include: degree that participants gained skill because of participation in a class (pre and post surveys) extent to which participants benefited because of participation: increased fitness, reporting more positive experiences than before participation; decreases in reported negative incidents or violence; recruitment efforts of coaches and volunteers; economic impacts on community businesses. Agencies may also measure professional outcomes of programs and services. Some evaluation criteria may include: number of coaches attending clinics; financial benefits; impacts on fields and facilities, etc. These criteria may change depending upon the nature of the programs being evaluated as well as the diversity of the agencies offering the programs. Implementing the YSFI CPRS, in partnership with the National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS), created the Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative with the intention of developing a model plan for implementing three key community recommendations identified by NAYS as mentioned earlier in this report. The Recommendations for Communities that appear in this document represent a consensus of what professionals in the youth sports field firmly believe need to be the course of action taken to return youth sports to their rightful place, and alter the failing atmosphere that looms over many programs. They address how communities can change the culture of youth sports and resurrect a fun and stress-free playing environment for youngsters by focusing on reform, education and accountability. These Recommendations outline aggressive steps that are aimed at mending a multitude of problems – such as over-aggressive parents, untrained league administrators and win-at-all-cost youth coaches – that are leaving an indelible mark on programs. Understanding the programs and services offered by NAYS is the first step in implementing the NAYS/NRPA Recommendations for Communities. NAYS Programs and services The National Alliance For Youth Sports offers its established programs throughout the year at our 3,300 community-based chapters that exist among Park & Recreation Departments, Boys & Girls Clubs, Police Athletic Leagues, YMCAs, military installations and other independent youth service organizations. Alliance programs are offered in communities that represent a diverse range of inner city areas, rural regions, suburbs, military bases, and towns across America. More than 6,000 professionals in the park & recreation field who work for municipalities and/or volunteers for community-based youth sport programs facilitate these programs. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 18
  • 19. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Administrators Two national training programs — the Academy For Youth Sports Administrators and the National Youth Sports Administrators Association (NYSAA) serve professional and volunteer youth sports administrators who run, supervise, and/or provide facilities for organized, out-of-school children’s sports programs all over the country. Professionals can earn their Certified Youth Sports Administrator (CYSA) credential by successfully completing the comprehensive training that is available on-site or online. More than 900 professionals have earned their CYSA credential to date. Volunteer community members (usually parents) who run their own independent programs or leagues and set the standards for the children in their care can become members of NYSAA. These Alliance programs are critical to improving youth sports because around 90% of youth sport administrators receive training “on the job” rather than through structured training opportunities. Coaches NAYS’s largest program, the National Youth Sports Coaches Association (NYSCA), provides training to adults who volunteer to coach youth sports teams through 3,300 community-based chapters. Volunteers receive what is often their only training experience through the NYSCA program. Approximately 180,000 individuals from around the country attend NYSCA clinics each year and become NYSCA certified coaches. These individuals are usually mothers and fathers with a variety of different income levels who have young children involved in organized, out-of-school youth sports programs. Approximately 1.4 million coaches have received training through NYSCA since its inception, impacting over 25 million kids involved in youth sports. Parents Parents who have children involved in organized, out-of-school youth sports programs are also served by the Alliance through the Parents Association for Youth Sports (PAYS). This program, which is implemented through local leagues, reaches mothers and fathers from a wide cross-section of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds who are united in their desire to provide their children with a safe and positive experience in youth sports. The PAYS program is offered in 450 communities. Certifying Professional Administrators (ACADEMY) The Academy for Youth Sports Administrators is a unique educational opportunity that builds the body of knowledge among administrators and decision makers in youth sports. The Academy is a 20-hour certification program designed to help raise the professionalism of youth sports administration. The Academy is the only opportunity for youth sports administrators to earn the “Certified Youth Sports Administrator” (CYSA) credential, and has been qualified by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) as an authorized CEU provider. The Academy is also available as an online training and networking opportunity. Upon completion of the Academy, participants earn 2.0 CEU’s. To maintain the certification, CYSA's must complete at least 10 hours (1.0 CEU) of continuing education every two years - specific to youth sports administration. The National Alliance For Youth Sports will maintain your CEU transcript. To earn a CEU’s, you may attend NAYS Annual International Youth Sports Congress, take a course at a local accredited college, or attend courses or conferences through your Recreation and Parks Association. The sessions must pertain to youth sports or your professional development in the field of Parks and Recreation. International Youth Sports Congress (CONGRESS) Each year the International Youth Sports Congress brings together park and recreation professionals, military youth sports directors and private league administrators from the field We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 19
  • 20. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative of youth sports. This event is also open to the general public and addresses specific topics in the area of youth sports. Experts from around the world present information within their specialization as it affects youth sports. By the close of this educational event, attendees will have received information and resources to provide better youth sport opportunities within their own communities. The 2005 International Youth Sports Congress will be held in Denver, Colorado September 15-18, 2005. Training for Volunteer Coaches (NYSCA) The National Youth Sports Coaches Association is a membership organization and the most widely used volunteer coach training program in the nation, having educated more than 2.0 million coaches since its inception in 1981. More than 3,000 community-based organizations offer this program. To become a member, coaches must (1) participate in an NYSCA interactive video training clinic (2) successfully complete an exam and (3) sign a pledge committing to uphold the NYSCA Code of Ethics - members not adhering to the NYSCA Code of Ethics, as determined by the local chapter, may have their membership revoked. NYSCA member benefits include excess insurance coverage, a quarterly publication, the option to add on a comprehensive screening and criminal background check program, plus a variety of other benefits. NYSCA Initial Level Membership: Introduction to coaching youth sports program To become a member, coaches participate in an NYSCA interactive video training clinic, successfully complete an exam and sign a pledge committing them to uphold the NYSCA Code of Ethics. The membership fee is $20. The first part of an NYSCA clinic is to view the Introduction to Coaching Youth Sports video, which is a general training video for all coaches, and then they view a sports-specific video. NYSCA training sessions will teach about such important topics as: · positive coaching philosophy for youth sports · how to conduct fun, effective practices · sport-specific fundamentals · injury prevention and treatment · the importance of role modeling for children Sport specific orientation in the following sports: baseball, softball, t-ball, basketball, soccer, flag football, football, cheerleading, hockey, in-line hockey, lacrosse, etc. At the end of each NYSCA clinic, coaches must (1) pass an exam that tests their understanding of the information conveyed in the clinic and (2) sign a pledge committing them to uphold a Code of Ethics. NYSCA holds coaches fully accountable to the standards set by the Code. Coaches will receive training, continuing education through quarterly issues of its magazine. While acting in the capacity as a volunteer coach, members receive $1,000,000 excess liability insurance coverage for membership during year one. Each membership year thereafter, NYSCA members receive $2,000,000 excess liability insurance coverage along with $250,000 excess Accident/Medical insurance coverage while acting in the capacity as a volunteer coach. The Alliance shall maintain the NYSCA member coaches in their national database and provide updated information as required. NYSCA Continuing Membership Program: After completing the introduction to coaching youth sports program, coaches will receive a renewal notice for continuing their membership (received prior to their membership’s expiration date). To continue membership, the We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 20
  • 21. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative member resigns the Coaches Code of Ethics Pledge and remits the annual $20 membership fee. Gold Level Certified Coach: NYSCA members can now obtain a higher level of education through the Gold Level Certified Coach Course. This web-designed course, created specifically for NYSCA members who desire to increase their coaching knowledge, delivers an e-learning experience in eight key topic areas. The course also includes over 430 links to drills and skills in 21 different sports. The cost of the online Gold Level Certified Coach Course is $60. Youth Sports Parent Orientation (PAYS) The Parents Association For Youth Sports is a membership organization for parents promoting positive sports. PAYS helps parents better understand their roles and responsibilities in supporting the league goals, the coaches and the kids involved in youth sports. To become a member, parents must (1) participate in a PAYS interactive video training clinic and (2) sign a pledge committing to uphold the PAYS Code of Ethics. PAYS member benefits include a parent handbook, a quarterly publication, plus a variety of other benefits. Annual membership dues for PAYS are $5. PAYS clinics occur in the local community and online at www.nays.org. Guidance and Support for Volunteer Administrators (NYSAA) The National Youth Sports Administrators Association is a membership organization for volunteers responsible for the planning and implementation of out-of-school sports programs. The NYSAA works to assist volunteer administrators, league presidents and board members in their efforts to set high standards and provide a safe, positive experience for the youth they serve. The Alliance will provide all materials necessary for staff to train the volunteer league board members. This training is designed for volunteer board members and administrators overseeing specific youth sport programs. The program consists of an interactive video clinic that provides a child first youth sports philosophy. There is an overview of volunteer coach, parent and youth issues and a Journal addressing many of the topics that challenge administrators. Participants sign and are held accountable to the NYSAA Administrator’s Code of Ethics pledge. Volunteer administrators will receive $1,000,000 excess liability insurance coverage and $2,000,000 aggregate coverage in Directors and Officers liability insurance while acting in the capacity as an administrator. The Alliance shall maintain the NYSAA member administrators in their national database and provide updated information quarterly. Annual membership dues for NYSAA are $20. Training for Officials (NYSOA) The National Youth Sports Officials Association is a membership organization for volunteer game officials to better understand their roles and responsibilities when officiating youth sports. To become a member, officials must (1) participate in an NYSOA interactive video training clinic (2) successfully complete the exam and (3) sign a pledge committing to uphold the NYSOA Code of Ethics. NYSOA member benefits include a quarterly publication, excess liability insurance coverage, plus a variety of other benefits. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 21
  • 22. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Early Skill Development (Start Smart Sports Development) The Start Smart Sports Development Program brings parents and children ages 3 and older together to work on pre-sports skills such as catching, kicking, throwing and batting in a fun, non-threatening environment. The six- lesson Start Smart curriculum teaches parents how to best work with their children to develop motor skills that will give both parent and child a positive and successful start in sports. Early Sport-specific Skill Development (Start Smart; Soccer, Baseball, Basketball, Football and Golf) The Start Smart Sports-specific Programs teach parents and their children basic motor skills development and sport specific skills while preparing the child for organized sports participation. Start Smart sport specific programs teach children the most basic concepts of the game, which creates better participants. Parents who participate in the program are also more likely to volunteer to coach in the future since they develop a more clear understanding of how to best work with children in a sports environment. Start Smart currently offers sport specific programs in baseball, soccer, basketball, football and golf. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 22
  • 23. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Implementing the NAYS Community Recommendations Recommendation #1: Adopt a community philosophy that makes youth sports safe and positive for children. Implementing the first recommendation involves a three-step process. The first step is to gain a clear understanding of current issues that challenge youth sports in your community and identifying stakeholders within your community that you can partner with to address these issues. Providing these stakeholders with the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Framework will educate them about your organizations efforts. The second step involves developing a philosophy that meets your community’s needs. Many challenges exist within in this step, and can be time-consuming. It is recommended that agencies adopt or edit and adopt the collaborative CPRS and NAYS youth sports philosophy provided in this report. Editing and adopting simply means utilizing the basic outline of the philosophy and molding it to fit the specific needs of the youth sports programs within your community and within your agency. Recommended Youth Sports Philosophy: We (insert agency, program or department name) recognize the need to inspire changes in youth sports to make the experience safe, positive and fun for everyone involved, and believes in its vision “Creating Community and Quality of Life Through People, Parks and Programs.” We believe in the benefits and attraction of youth sports as a means to teach the children of this community values and skills that will be of benefit to them throughout life, and our vision for youth sports is “We create positive sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life.” In order to realize the true value of youth sports participation and to provide a safe, positive and fun environment for youth and their families to participate, we must raise the standards among the users of our City's youth sports facilities; and the Recommendations For Communities that were derived from the National Summit on Raising Community Standards in Children's Sports outlines a comprehensive community strategy to assist us in meeting these objectives. We have appointed a qualified professional youth sports administrator who has been trained and certified to oversee all organized youth sports programs to ensure a high standard among the users of the community's facilities and we believe that league organizers and administrators should be educated on how to provide a safe, positive and fun youth sports environment before being granted permits to use facilities. We believe volunteer coaches and parents should receive orientation and education as to their individual roles and responsibilities in our effort to raise the standard of youth sports programs and that volunteer coaches and parents be accountable for their behaviors. We believe young children must be given the opportunity to develop motor skills and sports specific knowledge with their parents in a structured program before they enter organized sports, and have developed several “Pint-sized sports” classes in addition to National Alliance for Youth Sports “Smart-Start” classes to help provide these opportunities. As stated above this philosophy was adopted from NAYS, and also serves as a draft resolution that communities can use to get support form their city councils. The draft resolution was also adapted from information provided by NAYS. Passing a resolution that supports your philosophy is the third step in We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 23
  • 24. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative implementing the first community recommendation. A copy of a draft resolution is included at the end of this report, in a section that also outlines several tools useful for implementing these recommendations. Recommendation #2: Appointing a professional youth sports administrator to ensure adherence to the philosophy Within every parks and recreation department or youth sports agency, there is usually a diverse organization chart with staff responsibilities usually spread through these staff levels: Directors or Superintendents, Managers, Supervisors, Coordinators, and various Recreation Leaders and support staff (marketing, office managers, registration clerks, payroll, etc.) While not all positions reflect similar job responsibilities, these general classifications exist within most agencies. For purposes of implementing the community recommendations, it is recommended that the Manager who oversees the sports division of an organization become the NAYS youth sports administrator. Lower level staff could then become chapter directors and clinicians to support ongoing training efforts and program development. Setting up an administrator in this manor helps to create buy-in of the NAYS standards and youth sports philosophy throughout a specific division and department wide. The CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative is a model that is easily adaptable, and possible to implement from any staff level. An example could be a part time Recreation Leader who has the responsibility of supervising an after-school basketball program. This staff member could in effect, review this report and influence his or her supervisor to open a NAYS chapter. The Recreation Leader could then become a clinician and facilitate trainings for the officials, coaches, and parents that are a part of the after school program. While this would not be an example of fully implementing all three recommendations, the benefits and results of this example will spill over to the rest of the department, thereby creating an atmosphere where other staff, managers and supervisors will be open to implementing the program. After selecting an individual to take on the role of administrator, it is important to contact NAYS in order to establish a NAYS chapter in your community. This also helps connect your organization with the latest trends, data, and training available to help shape the climate of youth sports. The Taskforce found that the staff at NAYS were very helpful in providing vision and direction regarding the implementation of the Community Recommendations as well as programs offered through NAYS. Selecting an individual to be the administrator is followed by providing that individual with the knowledge, skills, and tools to help ensure that community youth sports groups that utilize municipal facilities and that internal agency youth sports programs are adhering to the philosophy. This involves communicating the philosophy to key stakeholders within the department and also within the community. External stakeholders would be directors of little league organizations, youth soccer, volleyball, basketball, and football organizations that utilize municipal facilities, but are not directly operated through municipalities. These organizations generally have codes of conduct for their participants, coaches, officials and parents, however they are sometimes slow to respond to reports of misconduct. The role of the youth sports administrator then would be to implement guidelines for encouraging these organizations to appropriately address reported concerns. Recommendation #3: Holding everyone associated with the program accountable for their behavior Adopting the recommended youth sports philosophy, passing a the recommended resolution and sharing this philosophy with others, and appointing a youth sports We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 24
  • 25. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative administrator and contacting NAYS to open a chapter to begin training staff is a good start to changing the culture of youth sports in your community. The last recommendation may be the most important, and sometimes the most difficult. The programs offered through NAYS, and the position of administrator help set up the framework for ensuring internal and external programs, user groups and organizations not only by into the philosophy, but see value in holding themselves and others accountable for creating better sports environments for youth. While this may seem a daunting task, there are several ways administrators and staff can help. Most well known external youth sports organizations apply for facility use permits with municipal recreation agencies. An example of two tools useful in communicating the philosophy, and informing users of the consequences for not following policies is presented here. The first is referred to as the “External Group Agreement.” This form signature form reviews the agency’s philosophy, reviews a bulleted list of requirements for use of one of the agency’s facilities, and is signed by an authorized representative of the external group and the youth sports administrator. The form is available at the end of this report, and it can be copied and edited as needed for specific community needs. User groups are informed that noncompliance with the requirements may result in denial of their request to use a field or facility in the future. As with many agencies, demand for facilities may be higher than available space. A consequence of not being allowed to use a field helps strengthen the resolve of these user groups to ensure that our promise to kids is carried out. The second form (“Facility Rental Agreement”) is an actual facility reservation form that every user group must fill out in order to rent field space in Manhattan Beach. This form again reviews the policies, consequences, and recommendations for creating more positive sports environments for youth. The form is available at the end of this report, and it can be manipulated as necessary to fit the needs of your specific agency. Through the professional youth sports administrator, leagues that use facilities can be monitored and regularly evaluated on their effectiveness. Those who fail to adhere to the policies prescribed through the department will risk the opportunity to use these public facilities in the future. The office also handles complaints, reviews programs on a continuing basis that lease the facilities to ensure that they are meeting the agreed upon standards laid out in the resolution, and serve as a resource for reporting volunteers that abuse the established code of behavior. For monitoring internal youth sports programs, such as after school sports leagues, summer sports camps, or youth sports classes, the issue of accountability becomes easier to administer. The taskforce created two tools useful in this area, one for coaches, and one for parents. Referred to as Parent and Coaches Codes of Conduct, any contacted coach or parent of a participant in internal programs should be required to read, understand, and sign. Both forms are available at the end of this report. Contracted coaches should also mandated to go through the NAYS National Youth Sports Coaches Association (NYSCA) training, facilitated by the Administrator or one of four designated NAYS clinicians, all on staff with the department. Parents of participants in these internal programs and leagues are mandated to attend the Parents Association For Youth Sports (PAYS) training prior to the beginning of the program or league. Adopting the recommended philosophy, appointing a youth sports administrator and contacting NAYS to establish a chapter in your agency are essential first steps in changing the culture of youth sports in your community. While many managers, supervisors, and recreation leaders who may deal with the benefits and challenges of youth sports on a We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 25
  • 26. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative daily basis may understand these challenges, answering the call to begin to implement the community recommendations becomes the most difficult challenges. All to often professionals are confronted with tough issues, and recommendations on how to combat these issues in order to better serve community members, yet inaction continues to plague every department, every city and every program that provides youth sports experiences. Implementing the Initiative What’s in it for You? Implementing the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative has many benefits. Overall, implementing the initiative creates a unified vision and direction for youth sports and will help agencies and youth sports professionals create positive sports experiences. What’s in it for your community? Implementing the Initiative strengthens community image and sense of place. Adopting the recommended youth sports philosophy and communicating that philosophy throughout the community helps provide community members and potential program participants of the continuing efforts of your organization to provide more positive sports experiences for youth. Implementing the three community recommendations helps safeguard communities through preventative efforts to reduce the incidents of negative sports experiences. In the unfortunate situation where a program participant is harmed, organizations will be able to defend their programs because of NAYS programs established within that community- background checks for coaches and volunteers; clinician, parent, coach and official’s training programs help ensure that all parties involved have been exposed to the philosophy and understand their part in creating better sports for kids. What’s in it for your organization? Implementing the Initiative offers several key benefits to any youth sports organization. It helps centralize youth sports programming efforts through the establishment of a youth sports administrator; it resolves conflicts between external user groups who place high demands for facility use by creating systems, standards, and measures that hold each user group accountable for their behaviors. It provides your coaches, administrators and parents the tools to make their work more efficient and easier. Some agencies have several diverse divisions that in some levels have direct impacts on youth sports programs. For example, one agency may have one manager to supervise facility reservations; another manager who directly supervises sports programming; while another manager supervises people who work in the facilities. The Initiative creates a common vision for youth sports so that the person programming the activities, the person who reserves the fields, and the person who actually opens and closes that facility all understand their role in creating more positive sports experiences. Finally, from a risk management standpoint, implementing the Initiative puts agencies in contact with NAYS programs and services that provide additional liability insurance for all staff, coaches, officials, contractors and volunteers who work with youth sports programs. The liability insurance is in addition to insurance that may be offered through youth sports agencies, community programs like AYSO, and city municipalities. This benefit alone is worth investing in opening a NAYS chapter and implementing the community recommendations. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 26
  • 27. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative What’s in it for you to have your organization implement the initiative? Regardless of your level within the agency you work for or volunteer for, implementing the Initiative has many individual benefits. Your agency may not currently have many reported challenges or concerns with youth sports programs, and implementing the three recommendations can only help make your programs more significant. It provides you the tools to make their work more efficient and easier. The initiative provides a clear, unified programming vision that will help guide your youth sports programs and activities. Providing a clear, and well defined vision for youth sports, the recommended philosophy is easy adaptable at any staff level, from volunteer to contracted coach to director of a department. Partnering with NAYS provides you with instant training materials and videos for parents, coaches and officials, as well as current resources and research to continue improving your programs. Partnering with NAYS also provides you with liability insurance, updated training videos and resources, as well as access to ongoing professional development opportunities. What’s in it for parents and participants in your community? Implementing the initiative exposes the community, parents, coaches, and players to a unified philosophy and vision that transcends sports-specific ethics so that within each sport and throughout each sports season clear behavioral expectations are standardized. Parents who sign their children up for soccer, receive the same service levels, expectations, and well trained coaches as they would for basketball, baseball, or football. This provides consistence from league to league and sport to sport. Parents are also provided with valuable resources to help ensure that their child is well prepared for sports through programs offered through your involvement with NAYS. The Smart Start program is an example of this, and is easily implemented within any sports agency. Parents will also benefit from strengthened relationships with coaches, other parents and officials through clinics offered, behavioral contracts that communicate the vision of youth sports, and resources provided through the Parents Association for Youth Sports (PAYS), a NAYS program. The focus of the initiative is the children who participate in youth sports within your community. Implementing the Initiative helps ensure that these children will continue to choose to participate in athletics, leading to a healthier more active life. The CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative creates an atmosphere where children are participating in sports, learning new skills, and having fun. Conclusion The California Parks and Recreation Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative provides a programming framework and guidelines for changing the culture of youth sports within communities in California. Youth Sports agencies responded to a survey regarding the climate of youth sports in 2003, reporting that many faced challenges with parental misbehavior, violence amongst players, and negative experiences from coaches, and officials. While many agencies may feel their youth sports programs are free from indecent, the implementing the Initiative will help put into place three key recommendations that together offer preventative measures to help ensure programs continue to create positive sports experiences. Answer the call to action, implement the recommendations for communities, contact NAYS, contact CPRS and see how you can influence the culture of We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 27
  • 28. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative youth sports in your community before the news headlines in your city report another tragic incident. Appendix: Minimum Standards for Youth Sports Example Forms Implementation Checklist We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 28
  • 29. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Minimum Standards for Youth Sports in California These are the CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative Recommended Minimum standards for youth sports programs in California The Minimum Standards of Youth Sports in California outlines the recommended minimum program standards that are needed to assure communities offer children a safe, fun and stress-free sports environment. Professional or volunteer administrators need to learn how to ensure every child has a safe and fun experience. Volunteer coaches need to complete a coaching certification program and be held accountable. Parents need to learn the role and responsibilities of supporting their child, the program and the coach. With the Minimum Standards of Youth Sports in California our hopes are that the minimums are what are needed to keep kids coming back to play sports. There are national programs available that offer the training needed otherwise programs can develop their own. Clinics/training sessions need to be held for volunteer administrators, coaches and parents to assure consistency so if something inappropriate occurs, administrators are educated to respond fairly and swiftly. Minimum Standards for Criminal Background Checks BENEFITS To protect young athletes from individuals preying on children. 1. APPLICATION FORM All persons directly involved in coaching or supervising organized youth sports activity MUST complete an application. The application must contain the following: a. Name b. Address c. Date of birth d. Social Security Number e. Driver’s license number f. Criminal history check consent form g. List of states resided in h. Questions regarding convictions of a felony/misdemeanor? i. Youth sports experience j. Youth sports related references k. References other than relatives 2. CRIMINAL HISTORY CHECKS a. All applicants must have address verification prior to conducting criminal history check. Address verification must go back a minimum of seven years. b. Types of crimes that disqualify a person from coaching/supervising organized youth sports activity: 1. All felonies. 2. Misdemeanor violent crimes against another person. 3. Misdemeanor sex related crimes. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 29
  • 30. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative 4. Misdemeanor drug/alcohol related crimes. 5. Overseeing supervisors will have the authority to evaluate each "red flag" situation on a case-by-case basis (utilizing a great deal of consistency) and a determination will be made as to whether the applicant’s services will be retained. c. Local authorities will have the right to establish additional criteria. d. Criminal history checks must be done on a yearly basis. e. All addresses appearing on the address verification report should be checked in all jurisdictions corresponding with address verification. f. The following methods may be used to complete criminal history checks: 1. State Police 2. Local Law Enforcement Agency 3. Federal Bureau of Investigations 4. Commercial Information Systems 5. National Alliance for Youth Sports g. Check sex offender registry. h. All efforts to comply with the State of Oregon confidentiality laws must be applied. Minimum Standards for Coach Education BENEFITS Coach’s education helps volunteers understand the psychology of coaching children, giving coaches practical skills to help all kids have fun and maximizes their athletic skills. 1. Attend non-sports specific training course that covers: a. Knowledge of program philosophy b. Program policies and procedures c. Effective communication d. Practice organization and planning e. Sign a Coach’s Code of Conduct 2. Knowledge of legal issues: state laws, attacking officials, car-pooling, child abuse reporting. 3. Training in sport specific rules and regulations. 4. Hold parent meetings before, during and after season. 5. Sign a Coach’s Code of Conduct. 6. CPR and First Aid courses are encouraged. Minimum Standards for the Professional and Volunteer Administrator BENEFITS Statistics show that 90% of administrators have received no training on how to manage youth sports programs yet every day they make decisions and set policies that affect the children in their care. Professional and volunteer administrators who use public and private facilities should be educated on how to properly run their programs prior to being granted use of facilities and they should be held accountable for their actions. Programs serve as a preventative measure and can ensure that adult volunteers using public facilities have the appropriate training, thereby reducing risk for facility owners. 1. YOUTH SPORTS PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATOR 1. Training standards for the professional administrator must include: 1. Understand and have the authority to implement standards We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 30
  • 31. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative 2. Knowledge of hiring and firing practices 3. Authority to hire and fire coaches 4. Knowledge of risk management and insurance 5. Knowledge of evaluating, counseling, and disciplinary process 6. Knowledgeable in accessing resources 7. Access to resources and educational tools 8. Knowledge of contractual agreements 9. Program specifics 2. YOUTH SPORTS VOLUNTEER ADMINISTRATOR 1. All sports leagues need to designate a representative for completing a training session which includes: a. Developing and enforcing the league philosophy, policies and procedures b. Recruitment of coaches and volunteers c. Risk management and insurance d. Fundraising e. Parent involvement 2. Each organized youth sports league must designate a representative with the authority to identify the responsible party and oversee the coaches within the program. 3. Independent groups will work with local community administrator to assure all requirements are met. Minimum Standards for Independent Teams/Leagues BENEFITS To assure that teams are run for the children involved and safe, positive, fun is the goal for all involved. 1. All Independent teams/leagues must submit the following to the local community youth sports professional: a. Proof of Liability Insurance, naming the agency as additional insured, to the league administrator. b. Statement of financial review c. Attend meetings d. Provide proof for coach’s training e. Provide an orientation program for parents f. Require all coaches and parents to sign and adhere to a code of conduct. 2. City, Park and Rec, School District or private facilities must: a. Be willing to be a liaison b. To assist independent teams /leagues with meeting all minimum standards c. To provide “Stamp of approval” so teams can participate at other locations. d. Develop contract/agreement that list the understandings between parties 3. All coaches and parents should read, sign and adhere to a Code of Conduct Minimum Standards of Parent Education BENEFITS To help parents better understand and be aware of their roles and responsibilities creating a positive experience for all children. We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 31
  • 32. CPRS Youth Sports and Fitness Initiative 1. Each league/program must develop a program or use an existing program which includes: .a Questions parents should ask their child’s coach .b Effective communication: how to work with coaches .c How to be a positive supporter .d Volunteering to help the team 2. Parents should support their young athlete by: .a Attend all parent meetings with coach .b Attend practices/games/social events .c Signing and adhering to a Code of Conduct .d Volunteer to help team Minimum Standards for Officials Education BENEFITS Training provides officials with detailed information on the skills, fundamentals, and common problem area for officials. 1. Attend sports specific official training courses that covers: a. Knowledge of program philosophy b. Policies and procedures of officiating c. Effective communication d. Rules and their enforcement 2. All officials should read, sign and adhere to a Code of Conduct We Create Positive Youth Sports Experiences, Better Sports for Kids, Better Kids for Life 32
  • 33. INITIATIVE TOOLS: CPRS Youth Sports Initiative Recommended Implementation Plan Checklist o Inventory youth sports program offerings within your community o Identify internal and external programs and organizations o External organizations or programs are those run by local soccer, baseball, basketball and football groups such as: Little leagues, AYSO soccer leagues, or local basketball leagues. Generally, these organizations are run by people or staff outside of the department, but often are provided permits to utilize fields and facilities within a recreation department. o Internal programs would include any additional classes, leagues, or clinics that are managed or supervised by department staff. Often these programs include contracted officials, coaches, or league administrators that report to department staff o Identify internal staff to appoint the position of Youth Sports Administrator o Contact NAYS to open NAYS chapter in your city. o Review NAYS resources available for your city: o Youth Sports Administrator o Chapter Director o Clinicians who facilitate trainings for coaches, officials, and parents o Training videos, liability insurance coverage, state and national conferences, skills development class curriculum and materials for youth sports, and all the NAYS related associations for administrators, coaches, parents, officials and volunteers o Adopt the philosophy and resolution through city council o Hold internal and external user groups accountable for adhering to the philosophy o Utilize field reservation agreements that include philosophy o Utilize external group agreement form o Contact external group governing bodies to report any misconduct o Contact NAYS for internal group misconduct as stipulated through the NAYS program agreements. o Implement your new youth sports program that meets the community recommendations from NAYS/NRPA
  • 34. Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Youth Sports Philosophy The City of Manhattan Beach recognizes the need to inspire changes in youth sports to make the experience safe, positive and fun for everyone involved, and believes in its vision “Creating Community and Quality of Life Through People, Parks and Programs.” We believe in the benefits and attraction of youth sports as a means to teach the children of this City values and skills that will be of benefit to them throughout life. In order to realize the true value of youth sports participation and to provide a safe, positive and fun environment for youth and their families to participate, we must raise the standards among the users of our City's youth sports facilities; and the Recommendations For Communities that were derived from the National Summit on Raising Community Standards in Children's Sports outlines a comprehensive community strategy to assist us in meeting these objectives. We have appointed a qualified professional youth sports administrator who has been trained and certified to oversee all organized youth sports programs to ensure a high standard among the users of the community's facilities and we believe that league organizers and administrators should be educated on how to provide a safe, positive and fun youth sports environment before being granted permits to use facilities. We believe volunteer coaches and parents should receive orientation and education as to their individual roles and responsibilities in our City's effort to raise the standard of youth sports programs and that volunteer coaches and parents be accountable for their behaviors. We believe young children must be given the opportunity to develop motor skills and sports specific knowledge with their parents in a structured program before they enter organized sports, and have developed several “Pint-sized sports” classes in addition to National Alliance for Youth Sports “Smart- Start” classes to help provide these opportunities. “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” 34
  • 35. A RESOLUTIONON A RESOLUTION ON YOUTH SPORTS IN CITY OF MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the City Council of Manhattan Beach recognizes the need to inspire changes in youth sports to make the experience safe, positive and fun for everyone involved; and WHEREAS, the Department of Parks and Recreation believes in its Vision of Creating Community and Quality of Life Through People, Parks and Programs; and WHEREAS, the Department of Parks and Recreation is committed to accomplishing its Mission to; Promotes health and wellness; fosters human development; facilitates community problem solving; Strengthens safety and security; provides recreational experiences; increases cultural unity; strengthens Community image and sense of place; supports economic development; and protects environmental Resources; WHEREAS, the Department of Parks and Recreation believes in the benefits and attraction of youth sports as a means to teach the children of this City values and skills that will be of benefit to them throughout life; and WHEREAS, we believe that in order to realize the true value of youth sports participation and to provide a safe, positive and fun environment for youth and their families to participate, we must raise the standards among the users of our City's youth sports facilities; and WHEREAS, the Recommendations For Communities that were derived from the National Summit on Raising Community Standards in Children's Sports outlines a comprehensive community strategy to assist us in meeting these objectives; and WHEREAS, we appoint the City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Sports and Aquatics Manager, a qualified professional youth sports administrators who has been trained and certified by the National Alliance of Youth Sports to oversee all organized youth sports programs to ensure a high standard among the users of our community's facilities; and WHEREAS, we believe that league organizers and administrators should be educated on how to provide a safe, positive and fun youth sports environment before being granted permits to use facilities; and WHEREAS, we believe volunteer coaches and parents should receive orientation and education as to their individual roles and responsibilities in our City's effort to raise the standard of youth sports programs and that volunteer coaches and parents be accountable for their behaviors; and WHEREAS, it is necessary and desirable to establish requirements and procedures for youth sports organizations utilizing public facilities; and WHEREAS, we believe young children must be given the opportunity to develop motor skills and sports specific knowledge with their parents in a structured program before they enter organized sports. 35
  • 36. NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED NOW, THAT, I, Linda Willson, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA, on behalf of the City Council and the residents do hereby recognize and encourage official implementation of the California Parks and Recreation Societies / National Alliance for Youth Spots, YOUTH SPORTS & FITNESS INITIATIVE to improve the culture of youth sports for all participants in the City of Manhattan Beach BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that copies of this resolution be sent to appropriate organizations within the City of Manhattan Beach that might have a collaborative interest in this Initiative such as AYSO, M LL, MBMS PASSED AND APPROVED THIS ___________day of ___________________, 20_____. Signed: __________________________________________________________________ Linda Willson, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” 36
  • 37. “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids better Kids for life” City of Manhattan Beach Youth Sports OUR PROMISE TO KIDS City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department recognizes the value of youth sports on publicly owned facilities and as a community working together we will do our best to deliver on these promises to our kids. • We promise to provide you the opportunity: • For a Fun, Safe, Positive environment in which to participate • To participate under the supervision of positive role models that will help focus on developing skills, teamwork, sportsmanship and how to win and lose graciously • For all participants to play regardless of skill or ability • To build self-confidence and self-esteem while respecting oneself and others • To make new friends • To continue to improve and enhance the quality of your youth sports experience Everyone associated with this youth sports program will do their part in keeping these promises to our kids. Representative Name: Signature: AGREED: Date: Name of Program/Organization To make good on these promises: 1. Each youth sport league/program must agree to abide by the policies and procedures that are established by the public entity. 2. All professionals, volunteer administrators, coaches, and parents must successfully complete an orientation/training program that includes an understanding of the community's philosophy, policies and procedures, and specific knowledge required for each position. 3. Everyone associated shall be held accountable for his or her actions and behaviors. City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation- Partners in promoting a positive youth sports environment. Youth Sports Administrator _____________________Date:_______________________ 37
  • 38. Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department 1400 Highland Avenue, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266 (310) 802-5410 • (310) 546-3501 (TDD) Application for Use of City Facility by Youth Sports Organizations (Allow 10 working days for processing) APPLICANT Organization ____ or Individual ____ (Please provide or attach proof of non-profit status) Organization Name _________________________ Name ____________________________________ Address __________________________________ City _______________________Zip___________ Phone: Res. _______________________________ Bus. _________________ ext. __________ Pg. ________________________________ % Manhattan Beach residents in organization: _______ % (Please attach a copy of roster) TYPE OF ACTIVITY __________________________________________ __________________________________________ Is the event being catered? ____ yes ____ no Catering company: __________________________ Expected attendance: ________________________ Is the public invited? ____ yes ____ no ALTERNATE REPRESENTATIVE (Person to contact if applicant cannot be reached) Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ City ______________________________________ Phone: Res. _______________________________ Bus. _________________ ext. __________ Pg. ________________________________ FACILITY REQUESTED • Building _______________________________ Room _________________________________ • Ball Field ______________________________ • Park __________________________________ Area __________________________________ Other _____________________________________ Circle Day(s): M T W Th F Sa Su Date(s): from: ___________________ 20_____ to: _____________________ 20_____ Time of use: _______ am/pm to _______ am/pm (Rental time must include set-up & clean-up time) APPLICANT’S STATEMENT I, THE UNDERSIGNED, UNDERSTAND THE GENERAL REGULATIONS STATED ON THE BACK OF THIS FORM, AND THE PARK POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ATTACHED, AND WILL COMPLY WITH THEM. I FURTHER UNDERSTAND THAT ANY FEES CHARGED MUST BE PAID AT LEAST 10 WORKING DAYS PRIOR TO THE REQUESTED DATE OF USE. I recognize the City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department’s commitment to the positive value of youth sports on publicly owned facilities and as a representative of a Youth Sports Organization I will do my best to deliver on these promises to our youth. I promise to provide youth the opportunity:  For a Fun, Safe, Positive environment in which to participate  To participate under the supervision of positive role models that will focus on developing skills, teamwork, sportsmanship and how to win and lose graciously  For all participants to play regardless of skill or ability  To build self-confidence and self-esteem while respecting oneself and others  To make new friends  To continue to improve and enhance the quality of your youth sports experience Everyone associated with this youth sports program/ activity will do their part in keeping these promises to our kids. To make good on these promises: 1. Each youth sport league/program must agree to abide by the policies and procedures that are established by the City of Manhattan Beach. 2. All professionals, volunteer administrators, coaches and parents must successfully complete an orientation/training program that includes an understanding of the community's Youth Sports philosophy, policies and procedures, and specific knowledge required for each position. 3. Everyone associated shall be held accountable for his/ her actions and behaviors. I, the undersigned, hereby agree to be personally and financially responsible, on behalf of individual/organization, for all destruction, damage, or unnecessary abuse of City buildings, grounds, or equipment in any way arising out of the use or occupancy thereof by individual/organization. I agree to abide by and enforce all applicable laws, rules, and regulations governing the use of City buildings, grounds, and equipment. Lessee acknowledges that its rights under this agreement may constitute a taxable interest under California law. Lessee hereby agrees to be responsible for payment in full of any property or other taxes which may be assessed against the interests granted hereunder and hereby indemnifies and releases Lessor from any obligation or liability for such taxes. Lessee’s failure to promptly pay any such taxes prior to their due date shall be considered a material breach of this agreement and grounds for termination thereof upon forty-eight hours notice. 38
  • 39. I, the undersigned further state that, to the best of my knowledge, the City property, for use of which application is hereby made, will not be used for the commission of any act intended to further any program or movement the purpose of which is to accomplish the overthrow of the Government of the United States by force, violence, or other unlawful means. __________________________/______________________________________/______________________ Organization/Individual Signature of Officer/Individual Date PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: City of Manhattan Beach. Payment must be made in full at the Parks and Recreation Department office upon submittal of application. A 50% forfeiture fee may be charged if the Department is not notified of cancellations at least three (3) working days before the scheduled use. Outdoor reservation cancellations due to rain may reschedule or receive a refund minus application fee. Permission to use the facility may be canceled for lack of compliance with the general regulations governing facility use, or should it be necessary to schedule City-related use. Customer Initial___________ APPLICABLE DAMAGE AND CLEANING DEPOSITS MUST BE PAID IN FULL AT TIME OF SUBMITTLE OF APPLICATION IN THE FORM OF A CASHIERS CHECK, PERSONAL CHECK, OR MONEY ORDER MADE PAYABLE TO CITY OF MANHATTAN BEACH. REFUND FOR DEPOSITS WILL BE MAILED FROM CITY HALL FOUR (4) WEEKS AFTER THE EVENT, PROVIDED ALL USE REGULATIONS ARE ADHERED TO. ALL REFUNDS TAKE FOUR WEEKS TO PROCESS. Applications are accepted a maximum of 6 months in advance for residents, and 1 month in advance for non-residents. (Exceptions: Wedding/Anniversary Receptions can apply 6 months in advance.) Resident is defined as: Any individual who lives, or owns a business in the City of Manhattan Beach. APPLICATION IS APPROVED / DISAPPROVED By _______________________________________ Director of Parks and Recreation Date _________ Application Fee $________ Facility Charges $ Damage/Cleaning Deposit $__________ Amount Paid $________ Date _________ Amount of Refund $ Date of Refund GENERAL REGULATIONS 1. Persons in attendance shall restrict their activities to those facilities, or portions thereof, to which their application entitles them. 2. Upon conclusion of the activity, groups must leave the facilities in a reasonably clean condition. Applicant shall be responsible for any damage. 3. When using lights on athletic fields and leaving early, please notify staff at (310) 802-5410 as a courtesy to nearby residents. For Dorsey and Live Oak South fields, dial 802-5420. For Begg, Marine Avenue, Manhattan Heights, and Village fields, dial 802-5425. 4. The applicant shall be responsible for the cost of repairs/replacement of damaged property, in addition to the damage deposit and cleaning deposit, should damage exceed the amount of these deposits. 5. All promotional materials intended to be used must be approved by the Department of Parks and Recreation prior to approval of the application. 6. All decorations to be used must be fireproof and receive Parks and Recreation Department approval prior to installation. 7. Profane language, quarreling or fighting, betting and/or other forms of gambling shall not be allowed. 8. The City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department reserves the right to request police/security at any event at the expense of the user. 9. For teen activities (dances, parties, and similar activities), at least two adult supervisors must be present for each group of 20 minors, and one adult for every additional 10 youths. Additionally, where more than 50 persons are expected to attend, Police Officers will be required in a ratio of one (1) for each 50 persons or fraction thereof. 10. Supplies or equipment such as tables, chairs, cooking utensils, picnic tables, grandstands, park benches, etc., shall not be removed from the facility to which they are assigned. 39
  • 40. 11. No money shall be paid to any Parks and Recreation Department employee in the form of a tip or gratuity. 12. All park policies, procedures, and City Municipal Codes / Ordinances must be adhered to. Failure to do so will result in forfeiture of damage deposit, and may result in the inability of the group to use City facilities in the future. 13. Applicant / Organization must have a copy of City-signed Application and Agreement For Use of City Facility on-site while utilizing the facility. Failure to do so may result in the inability to use City facilities in the future. 14. Athletic fields and park facilities may be reserved by residents a maximum of 6 months in advance, and non-residents 1 month in advance. 15. All caterers/contract and commercial vendor services must possess a valid Manhattan Beach Business License, and applicant must present copies to City Hall 10 working days prior to the event. ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS FOR INDOOR FACILITIES 1. Alcohol is not permitted in any park or City facility. 2. There is NO SMOKING in indoor public facilities. 3. No materials shall be attached to curtains, walls, ceilings, or doors without prior approval. Groups using the facilities for dancing shall not use any wax or other preparation on the floors. 4. Groups requesting use of the kitchen for a catered meal must secure their own caterer. (Manhattan Beach Business Licensee required.) It shall be the applicant’s responsibility to leave the kitchen entirely clean. Users of the kitchen must provide all utensils, linens, etc. 5. Applicant shall be responsible for any damages to kitchen and dining equipment caused by caterers or other persons. COVENANT TO INDEMNIFY THE CITY By my / our acceptance of this permit, I / we covenant and agree to relieve and discharge the City of Manhattan Beach and the officers and employees of said City, from any and all liability for loss and / or injury and / or damages to any person and / or property that may be sustained by reason of the occupancy and use of the facilities identified in the permit, and save them free and harmless therefrom. I / We also covenant and agree to pay for any and all damage to said facilities and damage to or loss of any other City property, resulting either directly or indirectly from such occupancy and / or use of the facilities, by or through the negligence and / or acts of myself / ourselves, my / our agents and employees, or any person(s) participating in or attending the performance, attraction, meeting, event, or affair in connection with or during said use and occupancy. VERIFICATION OF NON-DISCRIMINATION As a recipient of Federal Land and Water Conservation Funds used for the development of park facilities, the City of Manhattan Beach must ensure that parks are open to all persons without discrimination as to race, color, or national origin. In granting permission to hold the activity requested in this application, the City is assured by the applicant that no person will, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination in this activity, nor does the group or organization represented by the applicant practice such discrimination. This signature verifies that I have read the above information and that I, and the group I represent, agree to comply with all requirements. (Signature) ____________________________________ 40
  • 41. City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department Coach’s pledge to live up to Youth Sports and Fitness agreement and Standards I hereby pledge to live up to this agreement as a Youth Sports and Fitness Coach in the City of Manhattan Beach by following the CPRS (California Park & Recreation Society), NAYS (National Alliance for Youth Sports) and City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department Coaches Code of Ethics: I will place the emotional and physical well being of my players ahead of a personal desire to win. I will treat each player as an individual, remembering the large range of emotional and physical development for the same age group. I will Respect all persons involved in this program/activity. I will remember that I am a model for all youth. I will lead by example and respect all parents, players, referees, coaches and league officials by: • Speaking words of positive encouragement, and or instruction to players. • Practicing basic self control and refrain from doing or saying anything negative in the presence or earshot of children. • Informing coaches, referees and league representatives of disagreements only before or after games and practices and in private • Being responsive to the direction of, referees and league officials. • Collaboratively resolving conflicts and disagreements with the intention of strengthening relationships with players, parents, referees, coaches and league officials • Creating an alcohol, tobacco, and drug free environment during practices and games. • Contributing to the development of safe physical and positive psychological environment for all. I will refrain from their use at all youth sports events / activities. • Lead by example in supporting the vision of: “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” I will do my best to provide a Safe and Healthy playing situation for all players. I will promise to review and practice basic first aid principles needed to treat injuries of my players. I will do my best to organize practices that are fun and challenging for all my players. I will be knowledgeable in the rules of each sport that I coach, and I will teach these rules to my players. I will use coaching techniques appropriate for all of the skills that I teach. I will remember that I am a youth sports coach, and that the game is for children and not adults. Organization Name: _____________________________________________ Coaches Name: ___________________ Signature: ______________________ Date: _____________ Program/Organization Representative Name: __________________ Signature: _____________ Date:___________ Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Sports Administrator: _______________________Date: ___________ “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” 41
  • 42. City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department Parent/Guardian pledge to live up to Youth Sports and Fitness agreement and Standards I hereby pledge to live up to this agreement as a Parent / Guardian of a Youth involved in Youth Sports and Fitness League / Program / Activity in the City of Manhattan Beach by following the CPRS (California Park & Recreation Society), NAYS (National Alliance for Youth Sports) and City of Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department Parent Expectations and Code of Ethics: I will place the emotional and physical well being of my Child ahead of a personal desire to win. I will Respect all persons involved in this program/activity. I will remember that I am a model for all youth. I will lead by example and respect all parents, players, referees, coaches and league officials by: • Speaking words of positive encouragement in the presence of children. • Practicing basic self control and refrain from doing or saying anything negative in the presence or earshot of children. • Informing coaches, referees and league representatives of disagreements only before or after games and practices and in private • Being responsive to the direction of coaches, referees and league officials. • Collaboratively resolving conflicts and disagreements with the intention of strengthening relationships with players, parents, referees, coaches and league officials • Creating an alcohol, tobacco, and drug free environment during practices and games • Contributing to the development of safe physical and positive psychological environment for all. Supporting the vision of: “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” I will be knowledgeable in the rules of each facility /activity my child attends, and I will go over these rules with my Child. I will remember that I am a youth sports Parent / Guardian, and that the game is for children and not adults. Organization Name: Parent / Guardian Name Signature Date Program/Organization Representative Name: Signature Date Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Sports Administrator: Date “We create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life” 42
  • 43. Instructions to access the PAYS On-line Program Congratulations! You have received complimentary access for PAYS (Parents Association for Youth Sports) certification. The City of Manhattan Beach has made a commitment to create positive youth sports experiences, better sports for kids, better kids for life. PAYS helps parents become more positively involved in the youth sports experience, better understand their roles and responsibilities in supporting their organization, coaches and children. PAYS, also sets the standard for parent education through the Parents’ Code of Ethics, which creates accountability for all parents’ behavior. Benefits of PAYS Membership * 30 minute interactive video * Parent Handbook * Membership Card * Subscription to SportingKid Magazine LINK TO ACCESS THE PAYS ON-LINE PROGRAM: http://paysonline.nays.org or go to our website www.nays.org, click on the PAYS logo and click on the On-line Program in the left hand box. FROM THE ON-LINE PROGRAM HOME PAGE:  Click on *New User or *Returning User (see below for which one is applicable).  New User – Applies to everyone going on for the first time or if you are a renewing member.  Returning User – Applies if you have gone on before and couldn’t finish the program and now you are returning by using the 48 hr. password that you received via email.  Click on all boxes of Disclaimer page and click “I accept” at the bottom of the page.  Find your Chapter from the Drop Down List.  CA – City of Manhattan Beach  Type in your Chapter’s code.  1189  Then click next.
  • 44. Rights and Responsibilities in Youth Sports COACHES RIGHTS •To have support from the administration/league •To know what is expected of him/her •To have a fair procedure to bring concerns and complaints forward •To have ample opportunities to receive training to be a youth sports coach, including child abuse prevention RESPONSIBILITIES •To provide accurate background information to the league •To get needed training •To understand the role and influence of a “Coach” •To understand intervention and child abuse reporting procedures •To abide by a Code of Ethics •To be an advocate for the program’s philosophy •To set expectations for the season •To recognize the special needs of EACH athlete, gifted or not gifted •To limit physical interaction while conducting instructions •To provide appropriate and caring touch •To never touch out of anger •To keep programs free from put-downs, trash talk, profanity, violence and abuse •To motivate with praise and instruction •To not use physical punishment •To learn effective ways to channel frustrations and anger •To communicate respectfully with parents, athletes, officials & administrators •To provide a safe and fun sports environment OFFICIALS RIGHTS •To be treated with dignity and respect •To be free from receiving abuse •To have the support of the administration RESPONSIBILITIES •To set the tone for everyone to be a good sport •To get training on being an official and child abuse prevention •To be fair and impartial
  • 45. •To set limits and boundaries by not allowing abusive behavior on the part of coaches, players, parents or fans •To take an active role to create an environment free from abuse and inappropriate behaviors •To provide a safe and fun sports environment FANS and SPECTATORS RIGHTS •To be free from receiving abuse •To enjoy the fun and entertainment of being a spectator at a sporting event RESPONSIBILITIES •To behave in a non-abusive manner •To address others who are behaving abusively or inappropriately •To let someone in a position of authority know about abusive and inappropriate behaviors •To adhere to drug-, alcohol-, and tobacco-free standards at all youth sporting events •To create a safe and fun sports environment PARENTS RIGHTS •To have a safe and fun experience for your child •To have accurate and comprehensive information •To be a part of a quality program •To know about the complaint procedures RESPONSIBILITIES •To have a part in the supervision of the child •To be a good spectator •To bring forward valid complaints and concerns •To educate your child about abuse •To help each child find the right sport and program for his/her needs •To assess the philosophy of the coach and the organization •To provide each child with the physical and emotional nurturing and guidance they need to thrive •To be an advocate for each of your children •To support sons and daughters equally as athletes •To understand that all children are gifted, but not in equal ways •To support the individual needs and interests of the child •To provide unconditional love and support, not based on performance •To pay attention to see if your children are having fun and learning as opposed to just winning To create a safe and fun sports environment
  • 46. ADMINISTRATORS RIGHTS •To lead the program •To have control of the program •To have ample opportunities to receive training •To know what is expected of him/her RESPONSIBILITIES •To define and implement programs across all lines •To oversee all responsibilities of involved parties •To clarify philosophy, rules, policies and procedures •To create written policies that are clear and understood by participants, parents, coaches and officials •To understand the insurance policy and coverage •To get training needed for administrators •To screen, train and supervise all staff and volunteers •To create an emotionally, physically and sexually safe environment •To keep programs free from put-downs, trash talk, profanity, violence and abuse •To provide leadership, which creates a shield to protect the entire organization, prevents child abuse and promotes a child’s healthy development in and through sports •To be familiar with local child abuse resources and an attorney •To be prepared to address the concerns and needs of children who are abused •To provide conflict resolution in the event of conflicts, concerns and complaints •To provide a safe and fun sports environment YOUNG ATHLETES RIGHTS •To have sports be a safe experience, free from abuse and violence •To have fun learning, trying new things and being able to practice and play •To participate in a variety of sports opportunities RESPONSIBILITIES •To follow rules •To tell parents (or other trusted adult) about any abuse •To try our hardest and best •To learn the values of teamwork- helping and supporting one another •To learn ways to deal with pressure and frustrations •To care about what happens to others •To settle conflicts without saying or doing things that hurt others •To treat coaches and officials with respect •To treat others as you want to be treated
  • 47. •To be a good sport (how you talk to others and how you behave) •To let your parents and coaches know what you need.

×