Iادريس جاسم العبوديdris Jassim Al-Oboudi  In Wrpa 09winterwrpamag[1]
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Iادريس جاسم العبوديdris Jassim Al-Oboudi In Wrpa 09winterwrpamag[1]

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Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi ...

Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi
ادريس جاسم العبودي
ialiraqi@hotmail.com
ialoboudi@citymb.info



Idris is a nationally recognized Recreation and Parks professional and public speaker. A Highly motivating, energetic, passionate leader with vision and a pragmatic approach to recreation issues and needs, has been working in the field of Recreation for the Past 28 years. He is currently the Manager of Parks and Recreation for the City of Manhattan Beach California. Idris is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards and State / National and International notoriety and acclaim.

In February, 2008 Idris, received the Professional Distinguished Service Award. This is the highest award bestowed by the NRPA Pacific Southwest Regional Council. It recognizes professionals in the Region who have consistently given outstanding service to the park, recreation and conservation movement on the State, National and in the case of Mr. Al-Oboudi the international level. He also received the 2007 NRPA’s Program Excellence Award for Special Event.

In February, 2008 Idris, received Los Angeles County Special Commendation Award form forth District Supervisor Mr. Don Knabe. This Commendation is in recognition of dedicated service to the affairs of the community and for the civic pride demonstrated by numerous contributions for the benefit of all the citizens of Los Angeles County California.

In March- 2006 Idris received The California Park & Recreation Society’s (CPRS Over 4000 in Membership) highest Award and Citation that recognizes outstanding contributions to CPRS and the parks, recreation, and/or human serves profession. This award also recognizes his contributions that significantly affect the parks & recreation profession on a regional, sectional, state & national level. Idris was honored for his contributions to the profession and commitment to the Creating Community VIP Action Plan. Both in 2005 and 2006 Idris received the California Parks and Recreation Society’s President’s Award for outstanding Leadership and dedicated service to the parks and recreation profession in California.

In 2004 Al-Oboudi was the first Chair of California Parks and Recreation Society’s Youth Sports and Fitness Task Force (Initiative) in charge of providing modality, revamping and re-directing the youth sports experience in California municipalities and organizations. This Plan was rolled out in fall 2005 and is being implemented state and nation wide starting in spring 2006. Mr. Al-Oboudi was in the lead as a creator and organizer of the Rally in support of Youth Sports and Fitness at the California State Capital on March-8-2007 during the CPRS annual Conference.

Mr. Al-Oboudi is a 25 year member of the CPRS & a long time member of the NRPA. He has served the CPRS membership in many areas, he was the Education Program Chair of the 2008, CPRS Conference, and served in the same capacity in 2004. He has been and Advisor for the CPRS Director of Education for the CPRS CONF 2003-2005& 2006. He was elected as Southern CA CPRS Administrators Section representative serving from 2003 to 2005.

Mr. Al-Oboudi is a frequent contributor to leadership workshops and meetings on recreation issues in Local Collages, Universities, and California Cities, community organizations, CPRS, NRPA and nation wide organizations. Mr. Al-Oboudi Developed a proto type frame work for Vision Insight Planning and Programming (Purpose Driven Programming). This tool was further developed and adopted in Programming for Community and youth recreation, cultural and social activities (Purpose Driven Programming) for the Islamic Community in the USA and the World. This is the First Vision Insight Planning programming tool developed for Muslim Organizations world wide. This ground braking work is a prelude to a comprehensive Initiative Mr. Al-Oboudi is Envisioning, Espousing and Creating, for the Muslim Community in the USA.

A 25 year resident of the Cal

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Iادريس جاسم العبوديdris Jassim Al-Oboudi  In Wrpa 09winterwrpamag[1] Iادريس جاسم العبوديdris Jassim Al-Oboudi In Wrpa 09winterwrpamag[1] Document Transcript

  • A Publication of Washington Recreation & Park Association WINTER 2009 2008 Annual Report pg. 13 Legislative Platform pg. 16 Technology pg. 18
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  • WRPA Today Volume 23 Issue 4 Guidelines for Style & Format can be found on the WRPA Web site. Washington Recreation & Park Association 2009 Editorial Calendar 4405 7th Avenue SE, Suite 202 • Lacey, WA 98503 April issue: copy and photo/artwork due February 10 P: 360.459.9396 • F: 360.459.4160 July issue: copy and photo/artwork due May 10 wrpa@wrpatoday.org • wrpatoday.org October issue: copy and photo/artwork due August 10 January issue: copy and photo/artwork due November 10 contents President’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Executive Director’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Section News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 District News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Voters Overwhelmingly Support Parks! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Cultural Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2008 Annual Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The WRPA Endowment Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Washington Recreation & Park Association Legislative Platform 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Spotlight Professional … in Parks and Recreation: On the Cover Tara Mizell, CPRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Jalen Testerman, 7, tries a few moves as he “ciphers” at the Burien breakdancing “battle.” Jalen is an up-and-coming breakdancer. He has performed with the Boom Squad (the Essential Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 SuperSonics’ Dance Team) back in the 2005-2006 season and, this year, has appeared on Ellen DeGeneres’ television show twice and The Oprah Winfrey Show. How to Join . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Photo taken by Ellen M. Banner The 2009 WRPA Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 A Call for Cover Photos! WRPA Annual Conference & Trade Show. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 A full-color cover photo will be featured on the April 2009 issue. Photos selected for the cover will represent a member, agency or organization. To submit cover photos for consideration (up to two per agency), please send via CD or e-mail directly to Colin Walker at cwalker@bellevuewa.gov. Deadline: February 10, 2009. High-quality parks and recreation photos are needed! Photos considered for the magazine cover must be vertical and of the highest resolution (no smaller than 2.5 megs file size). The WRPA Public Relations Committee will review all submissions. WRPA Public Relations Committee is Casey Stanley, WRPA Today is published by Innovative Publishing Ink. Published January 2009 10629 Henning Way, Suite 8, Louisville, KY 40241 • 502.423.7272 Colin Walker, Scott River, Sarah Olson, Charles Sablan, Innovative Publishing Ink specializes in creating custom magazines Jennifer Gray and Sara Stratton. for associations and businesses. Please direct inquiries to Aran Jackson at ajackson@ipipublishing.com. For ad sales, call Bob Sales of Innovative Publishing Ink (IPI) at www.ipipublishing.com 502.423.7272. WRPA Today 3 View slide
  • President’s Message Preparing for New Possibilities and Collaborations We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children. – Native American Proverb 2009 is finally here. I have to say I’ve been looking forward our survival, as a species. We got ourselves into this mess, Mary Dodsworth, CPRP to a fresh new year. The past few months have been crazy so we need to make changes to undo the damage that in Washington state. The election season seemed to take has been done. What are we doing in Washington to be on a life of its own while our economy was taking a more “green”? WRPA is making changes (remote access nosedive. Local agencies had to prepare several versions to meetings means less cars on the road, and electronic of budgets to deal with rising costs and revenue shortfalls. agenda packets and announcements mean less paper) … Once again, our park and recreation services were on are you? I’d like to create an environmental committee the chopping block. Internal competition from our own (Green Team) to take a look at best practices across the public works, police and fire departments, along with lower- state. If you are interested in this topic, please call the than-anticipated sales tax and REET collections, will WRPA office and let us know. We can work together to reduce our ability to serve our communities. It is a scary reduce our impact on our neighborhoods and the earth. and uncertain time for many of our park and recreation departments. We must continue to fight for our place At the conference, the NRPA Pacific Northwest Regional at the table and advocate for our important and essential Council recognized several Washington professionals and programs and services. organizations for their hard work and success in the field of parks and recreation. Congratulations to Jeremy One highlight of the fall season was attending the NRPA Bubnick of the Peninsula School District, who received Congress in Baltimore, Maryland. The keynote speaker the Regional Young Professional Award; the Woodland was Robert F. Kennedy Jr. What an amazing presentation! Trail Association from Olympia for the Citation of Merit Mr. Kennedy is so passionate about saving the earth. It Award for an Organization; and King County Parks and was easy to see why he was named one of Time magazine’s Recreation, recognized for Overall Best Communicator. “Heroes for the Planet.” He started by working to restore the health of the Hudson River and has since trained The holidays are behind us, and the new year brings with others throughout the world to restore environmental it an opportunity to make a fresh start! The time is NOW! damage in their own communities. He reminded us that It’s time to get back to work with the resources we have, global warming isn’t an opinion; it’s a scientific reality. The look for new partnerships and collaborations to expand science tells us that human activity has made enormous our services and always be ready for new opportunities impacts to our planet and will affect our well-being, even when they come by! Executive Director’s Message Building a Better WRPA 2008 was a year of re-inventing WRPA. We are becoming Join us in building a better WRPA so that we can continue Brit Kramer, CPRP, CAE more systematic and focused about the future of WRPA, to improve our resources and experiences for members. Our and it shows. We’ve successfully transformed how we host Board, sections and committees need your participation our conference and trade shows to convention centers, to deliver essential members services. Through your launched a new interactive Web site and redesigned the participation and service, we fully experience the power of content, look and feel of our magazine. We’ve embraced the park and recreation community. GoToMeeting technology and are boldly addressing our cultural competency concerns. We’re not done yet. WRPA Today 5 View slide
  • Section News Facility Section information on critical issues in youth sports today. By attending the Academy The Facility Services Section would like to honor Yvonne Defty as our in Seattle, attendees earned 3.0 continuing Administrative Professional of the education units (CEUs). Year. Yvonne works for Mercer Island Parks and Recreation as its community “We are extremely pleased to have hosted center front office and customer service the onsite Academy in the beautiful Tukwila coordinator. According to staff members, Community Center and to provide an Yvonne is always willing to help meet opportunity to earn the Certified Youth Yvonne Defty, Mercer Island: Recipient of customers’ needs and expectations while Sports Administrator (CYSA) credential,” the Administrative Professional of the Year, also trying to assist coworkers with awarded by WRPA Facility Section said Lisa Licata, director of NAYS administrative duties. She continually professional administrator programs. suggests ideas for “a better way” of external customer service, meet auditing doing things. She strives to offer the requirements and provide quality data to Twenty-five recreation professionals, highest level of customer service with inform organizational decisions. many of whom were from the Washington fairness to all customers. Yvonne works area, attended this latest Academy. tirelessly in scheduling customer service staff members to meet the needs of Athletic Section “I learned an awful lot and trust that I can customers and the staff’s request for time The National Alliance for Youth Sports implement the majority of it within the off. She also always makes herself readily (NAYS) believes that, in order to improve next 12 months,” said Danny Speer of the accessible to her staff and customers. In youth sports at the local level, change Selah Parks and Recreation Department. addition, she works hard to schedule the must often begin from the top down. use of rooms at the community center That is why it created the Academy for Although the program is offered online, in the most efficient and consolidated Youth Sports Administrators (AYSA), a many youth sports administrators prefer way possible in order to maximize the professional certification and education the live clinics, where they have the usable space for all concerned. She is program for recreation professionals that opportunity to discuss the course content a very valuable team member and well recently held its latest clinic in Seattle, and how it relates to their program. loved by all! Washington, October 22-24. “I love meeting everyone and sharing The Facility Services Section would also The AYSA, which has certified almost stories and situations,” Potts said. “I like to honor Semere Melake with our 2,000 youth sports professionals to date, is think that the online class and the onsite Going Green Award in acknowledgement currently offered in both online and onsite class are two totally different experiences, of his efforts to “go green” by converting classroom style formats. In partnership and I would recommend that people the city of Seattle’s scholarship allocation with the Washington Recreation & Park attend the onsite class whenever possible. program to an automated system. This Association, its most recent onsite Academy I think the online class gives you lots of conversion decreased the amount of was held at the Tukwila Community information, but the explanation behind paper used during this process by 75 Center, located just outside Seattle. the information is missing, and that percent. The automated system has also piece is gained when you go to the decreased the application processing and “I thoroughly enjoyed the onsite class; onsite class.” notification time, as well as the amount I was really pumped up when I got to of staff time needed to administer the work today,” said Angela Potts, Recreation Some of the topics covered at the program. These changes have improved Coordinator for the city of Walla Walla, Academy are youth sports philosophy, management of scholarship resources, Washington. “We are actually doing a professional development, volunteer centralized monitoring of scholarship lot right, and I really felt good about the management, child abuse prevention, award requirements and eliminated staff direction that we have taken and where we parent management, conflict resolution, and recipient concerns about the process. are going.” insurance and risk management, and And, if that wasn’t enough, the new program evaluation and marketing. system Semere created established sound An intensive professional certification systems that ensure quality internal and program, the Academy offers cutting-edge 6 WRPA Today
  • Section News The Academy is the leading advocate Nuts and Bolts: The Basics: for higher education for youth sports By having one of our late-night staff • All events are free administrators. The Academy’s number-one members familiar with battles and the • Provide approximately nine staff goal is to provide attendees with the tools breakdancing community, it made members and two police officers they need to build the foundation of hosting our first battle fairly easy. Flyers • Promotes events through the breakers knowledge necessary to positively impact were created and distributed at other from their center, as well as online, the youth sports experience for all children. community centers around the area such as MySpace, Northwest B-boys where crews are known to practice. • Provides performances by local artists Information was also posted on our teen to represent all elements of Hip Hop Program Section program MySpace page as well as the Attention, recreation programmers! Northwest B-boys Web site. The teens Program Contact Information: also distributed flyers while participating Amanda Morales with the City of Burien at Are you being asked to create new 206.988.3711 or amandam@burienwa.gov. in other local battles. programs but wonder where you’re going to find the time to plan one more Waldo Nambo-Ojeda with the City of Shoreline at The “Battle of Burien” is an event that activity? We are all feeling the demand 206.801.2644 or wnambo-ojeda@ci.shoreline.wa.us. runs mainly with the help of volunteers. for innovative programs that meet the We have one staff member serving as needs of our community and/or generate disc jockey for the event and one doing Athletic Section/Fitness much needed revenue in this slumping general supervision. Local dancers who economy. Let’s work together! choose not to battle help judge the event. and Wellness Group The Fitness and Wellness Group was We hope to get sponsors and donations In each future issue, we will feature started in February ’07 by Joan Perugini for our upcoming battle, but the previous one innovative or “cash cow” program of South Bellevue Community Center. In two battles were just for bragging rights. submitted by WRPA members from her interview, one of the things she said she around the state. We hope this will would do was coordinate a quarterly group The Basics: serve as a great resource for programmers meeting of professionals in the fitness and • Held at the Burien Community Center feeling the pinch and trying to meet wellness field. We meet quarterly to discuss • Doors open at 7 p.m. the ever-changing needs of their issues, trends, equipment and new program • $5 admission (It’s a fundraiser for our communities. Please send programs you ideas in the area of fitness and wellness. The Burien Teen Leadership Council) would like to share with your fellow meeting host usually provides a tour of the • Three Battle Categories (the last event parks and recreation professionals to fitness facility as well as lunch. There is a included Top Rock Cypher, 4 on 4 wrpa@wrpatoday.org. group of about 20 fitness enthusiasts that Crew Battle and Grudge Battles) meets on a regular basis. Our first feature program was submitted Another Breakdance Battle Resource: by Amanda Morales, Recreation Specialist, Once we started meeting, we learned that The City of Shoreline Teen Programs has City of Burien. Check it out, and feel free there once was a strong fitness component been hosting breakdance battles for more to copy the idea! to the Athletic/Fitness Section. We are than seven years now. After attracting a hoping to rejuvenate the fitness portion of large number of teens at their Hip Hop the section and contribute to WRPA. If January’s Innovative Program: nights at the Rec Center, they expanded anyone is interested in joining our group, “Battle of Burien” Breakdance Battle their program to include breakdance please e-mail kmay@ci.tukwila.wa.us. The Idea Phase: battles. They draw in up to 300 The “Battle of Burien” was started by a participants and spectators at their events. group of teens and one of our late-night staff Next Meeting: January 28, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Their past event on October 18, 2008 members that came to the Burien Community in Redmond (Freefall ’08), included Brooklyn-Rock Center on a regular basis to practice their Battle, 2 on 2 Battles, Open Mic and breakdancing. After participating in other a Graffiti Battle. They hosted another local breakdancing battles, the teens advocated battle, Winter Nights ’08, on Saturday, to host a battle here in Burien. December 20. Information is available at www.recbattles.com. WRPA Today 7
  • District News District 1 and 2 Networking As the District One rep, I hope to organize another roundtable meeting further south in the early spring. Recently, we held a roundtable meeting at Burlington Parks and Recreation Department for all programmers and coordinators. The goal was to share ideas about events and activities that work and to help each other with San Juan Island Tour Recap issues that we face in our own cities. The meeting started at noon and was On October 9, 2008, seven total recreation professionals from scheduled to go until 2 p.m.; however, we all had so much to share and talk District One and District Two boarded the Anacortes ferry to visit about, we didn’t leave Burlington Parks Department until 3 p.m. Thanks Sally Thomsen, director of San Juan Island Park, and Abby Spann, to everyone who attended the meeting and for sharing your ideas. the coordinator of San Juan Island Park, for a tour of the beautiful San Juan Island. I’ve listed below a few of the ideas: • Karen Emroy from Everett is running a great program called “Code We learned great outdoor recreation ideas, especially for places to 10” for low-income families. launch kayaks, and we also visited a lot of county parks that would • Jane Lewis, also from Everett, is keeping busy running at least three be perfect for day trips. Some of the locations that we made stops outdoor trips a week all year round, with most of them filling up at: Roche Harbor’s watershed trail, garden and sculpture park. We before they even open the doors for registration. went to the following parks: San Juan Island County Park, English • Andrea Hartland from Marysville is crazy about programming for Camp, Lime Kiln Point and South Beach, also known as American teens; she also shared that their “Popcorn in the Park” movie series Camp. If you have never been to South Beach/American Camp was widely popular. before, you should make sure you get a chance to see the beautiful • Christi Kinney from Burlington was a wonderful host. She filled us beach that is covered with driftwood for miles and see the foxes in on her popular “Pumpkin Pitch” event that took place Saturday, that roam in the open fields next to the beach. Bring your coat, as September 27, and there were some changes this year. Due to the it can be a bit windy. safety of others and houses nearby, the contestants were not judged on distance, but only on accuracy and target. It was a perfect day of networking and visiting a beautiful island. • Sarah Olsen from Lynnwood talked about their “Get Movin” Sally and Abby are excellent tour guides and are open to any and program and the “Lynnwood Lights” winter celebration event and the all visitors. great sponsorship she has with Community Transit. Also, it sounds like Lynnwood has an excellent “Flashlight Egg Hunt” for third- District One Tour of San Juan Island: The trip was on October 9, through fifth-graders that all staff members are involved with. 2008. It was a great day to take in the beautiful San Juan Island • Marianne Johnson, also from Lynnwood, showed us some great with locals. The goal was to see the historic sights, hiking trails, vertical two-sided flyers that prove to be a perfect marketing popular kayak spots, parks and to just learn more about the island. tool. She also told us about the “Rock-It Fest” music festival that Sally was very happy to host us and would love for recreation showcases high school to college-age bands. departments to bring groups to the island more often. • Shelly Costers, also from Lynnwood, is the new program coordinator for the senior center. She organized a blues band to play for the senior center, served blueberry cobbler and had seniors on their feet dancing, and she called it, “BluesBerry Experience.” • Lauren Woodmansee from Skagit County is keeping busy with the “All Comers Track Meets” and doing a lot of family and adult trips. • As for myself, I was proud to share that my Third Annual Anacortes Art Dash Half Marathon, 10k and 5k is getting higher numbers and literally running smooth. From left to right: Marianne Johnson, Shelly Coster, Karen Emroy, Jane Lewis, Christi Left to right: Fred Wong, Tami Cobb, Christi Kinney, Nicole Johnston, Skye Kinney, Sarah Olsen, Nicole Johnston, Andrea Hartland and Lauren Woodmansee. Dunn, Sally Thomsen, Abby Spann and Sarah Olson. Not pictured is Cindy Not pictured was Loren Cavanaugh, director of Burlington, and Bob Vaux, director of Johnson, who was taking the photo. Skagit County, who stopped by to say hello. 8 WRPA Today
  • District News District 2 the television and online service for children, announced the list of 2008 Playful City USA communities and will support the initiative KaBOOM! Names Mercer Island a Playful City! Mercer Island was one of 67 with an extensive marketing campaign. communities across the country that has taken innovative This is the second year of the annual program, and 26 of the 31 approaches to make play a founding Playful City USA communities have made the list again, priority. Despite mounting while 41 new communities, including New York, Los Angeles, budget issues, communities St. Petersburg, Orlando and Mercer Island, have joined the ranks. large and small, urban and The agendas all of these communities have created impact not only rural, in the red and in the childhood wellness, but also public safety and quality-of-life issues. black, have created initiatives to increase both the quantity and Each of the 2008 Playful City USA communities demonstrated quality of play and playgrounds, as well as to increase access to existing creative commitments to the cause of play, including: opportunities to play. KaBOOM! also selected Mercer Island for its dedication to play. To honor these cities and towns that have made this commitment to Mercer Island’s parks and recreation department came up with a frog play, KaBOOM!, a national nonprofit dedicated to bringing play back into children’s lives, named them a Playful City USA community. Playful City USA is a national recognition program that honors cities and towns across the nation that put their children’s well-being first by recognizing and harnessing the power of play. KaBOOM! and qubo, WRPA Today 9
  • District News mascot to promote local parks among kids. Children can meet the frog at local parks and get photos, and the city is running a contest to name District 6 District 6 held a meeting in Spokane Valley at CenterPlace Regional the frog. Further efforts to promote play in the community include a Event Center on November 5. In attendance were professionals from children’s art contest and a “Destination Recreation” program designed Cheney, Pullman, Spokane County and Spokane Valley. Attendance to get kids out in the community and to playgrounds throughout was definitely lower than expected. The 2009 Eastside Skillbuilder the year. Kids can turn in their completed passport at the end of the is co-chaired by Megan Vining of Pullman and Kim Best of Cheney program to get a prize. and will be held at Cheney Middle School on Saturday, June 13. Kim and Megan are currently looking for interested, enthusiastic people “In a time when communities are struggling with critical financial to join the committee. When the agenda item “what you would like decisions, Mercer Island proved its commitment to the cause of to see us do as a district” came up, there was a healthy discussion play by launching creative initiatives designed to increase access to about having an annual District 6 kickoff meeting to brainstorm the playspaces, improve the quality of play in their community and direction to take for the year with meetings, trainings, social events increase the time children spend playing,” said Darell Hammond, and tours to get the momentum going for the year. Jennifer Papich KaBOOM! CEO and co-founder. “The ideas range the gamut, from and Jera Donner, chair and chair-elect for District 6, are going to new programming and access initiatives to creating informational create a survey to send out through Survey Monkey to all District 6 resources and public-private partnerships. It just goes to show you, members to find out how WRPA and the District can best serve them. where there’s a will, there’s a play.” For more information on District 6, please contact Jennifer Papich at 509.688.0190 or jpapich@spokanevalley.org. For more information on the 2009 Eastside Skillbuilder, please contact Megan Vining at megan.vining@pullman-wa.gov or Kim Best at kbest@cityofcheney.org. 10 WRPA Today
  • District News Voters Overwhelmingly Support Parks! Despite the economic levy rate is lower than the first voter-approved levy, which downturn, support for our is due to expire. parks on November 4 was strong. This is significant 5. City of Mercer Island Prop 1 GO Bonds – for our parks, our profession Accepted 55 Percent and our communities. This This proposition authorizes the city to restore and is a clear statement to our improve Luther Burbank Park, improve existing parks policymakers about how and facilities, upgrade sports fields, develop trails and much parks and recreation are valued. upgrade swim facilities. Of the 10 park ballot measures, eight were accepted, and two 6. City of Mercer Island Prop 2 Parks Levy – failed. Below is a list of the measures, along with a brief summary Accepted 54 Percent and election result. This levy will ensure the continued operation of Luther Burbank Park, improve forest and vegetative health of open 1. Bainbridge Island Parks Levy Lift – spaces and operate and maintain park and recreation-related Accepted 54 Percent facilities and services. The Park District Levy lid lift will provide funds for the following: 7. City of Sammamish Prop 1 Parks Bonds – • To acquire open space and additional park land. Accepted 58 Percent • To develop and improve open space and parks. This proposition authorizes the city to issue general • To maintain and operate existing and future district obligation bonds for the acquisition, development, properties to facilitate public use of and access to them. construction and improvement of park, recreation and athletic facilities. 2. Bellevue Prop 1 City Parks – Accepted 67 Percent 8. City of Samammish Prop 2 Levy Lid – Parks – This measure includes funding to enhance and maintain Accepted 54 Percent the Bellevue Parks & Open Space System. This would This proposition will fund park programs and operations accomplish the following: and maintenance of park, recreation and athletic facilities. • Protect water quality in Bellevue’s lakes and streams This will provide recreation programming to operate and and preserve natural areas throughout the city. maintain the new parks facilities funded by the bond levy. • Enhance existing parks. • Invest in sports fields, trails, community parks, and 9. City of Seattle Prop 2 Parks Levy – neighborhood parks. Accepted 60 Percent • Maintain improvements consistent with Bellevue This proposition will fund acquiring, developing and Parks’ standards. restoring parks, recreation facilities, cultural facilities, green spaces, playfields, trails, community gardens and 3. Carnation Prop 1 Public Safety and Parks – shoreline areas. Failed 53 Percent This proposition would provide additional monies 10. South Whidbey Parks GO Bonds – that would be specifically earmarked for public safety, Failed 63 Percent maintenance and operation of local parks (85 percent of This proposition will authorize the district to construct these additional funds would be used to maintain existing facilities, including a multiuse community recreation, fitness law enforcement operations). and aquatics center and tennis center infrastructure. 4. Finn Hill Parks District Six-Year Tax Levy – For more information, visit our Web site at www.wrpatoday.org Accepted 60 Percent or www.mrsc.org. This will be used to fund the district’s operation and maintenance of Orion O. Denny Park. This proposed new Submitted by Shelley Dahle, WRPA Staff Member WRPA Today 11
  • Corner Cultural intelligent, hardworking black man. One thing I did not realize by Angela Cosby, prior to this course is that all people, no matter what ethnicity or Spokane County Parks & Recreation race, want to be identified for who they are. However, by being “color blind,” we are bypassing these important traits, and instead, we classify the man to my right as an African-American and resist learning more about him, in hopes of not offending him and causing him pain. An aspect that really began to influence me is that, by not being culturally competent, I am, in return, hurting my organization and my community. Research clearly shows that if a group of people different from each other has, or can acquire, intercultural competence skills, they can, and do, significantly outperform groups made of individuals more similar to each other. Studies also show that well-managed diverse teams or organizations outperform others in the areas of quantity of work produced, creativity or innovation and quality of results. So we are essentially putting our organizations at a disadvantage by not being culturally competent. For us in the field of parks and recreation, our ability to be culturally competent directly affects our community. We are some of the most valuable leaders of our community, and if we are not culturally competent, how are we going to encourage our community to be? The final assignment for this class was to write an in-depth paper on actions that an organization will need to take in order to establish intercultural competence throughout the organization. Recognizing that one of WRPA’s strategic initiatives is to enhance the organization’s cultural competency, it was suggested that I write the paper on WRPA. The paper outlines numerous actions that WRPA should Growing up in Spokane, where 92 percent of the population is consider to increase its cultural competency. A few of these are: white, children rarely have a first-hand experience with diversity. At • The need for the association’s leader’s commitment. least, that was the case for me. In school, there were only a handful • Conducting an assessment. of students who were of a different ethnicity. I was raised with the • Creating an intercultural competence team. principle that all people should be treated equal, regardless of their • Providing intercultural competence trainings. race. I had always considered myself to be “color blind,” someone • Making necessary adjustments. who does not treat or judge others differently because of the color • Establishing measurements and staying on course. of their skin. WRPA is working to implement many of these actions. The WRPA This was my approach throughout high school and college, Board has demonstrated its commitment to cultural competency by and it never seemed to impact me until I took an international identifying it as one of four strategic initiatives. They have formed and intercultural cultural class as part of my master’s program. a Cultural Competence Committee that has been hard at work Throughout this class, I learned about the history behind different creating a work plan that will engage all WRPA members. It will cultures, including their past and present struggles. As the course include opportunities to attend education sessions at the Mid-Year continued, it became more and more apparent that being “color and Annual conferences, trainings opportunities for members and blind” was not necessarily a good thing. the Board and, hopefully, a survey next year to assist the WRPA in identifying the cultural competency level of its individual and agency If you are “color blind,” then you are keeping yourself from the members. This article is also part of a new addition to WRPA Today reality of what diversity truly is. Unfortunately, many of us are trying magazine called the “Cultural Corner.” to prevent uncomfortable situations and offending others. Therefore, we assume it is best to not recognize each other’s differences, just as I am thrilled to see all of these changes taking place and am excited to I had done. However, we are in fact creating more harm by not watch WRPA’s members benefit from being culturally competent and recognizing others for their differences. move forward with enhancing the communities we serve. Stay tuned! I want to be identified as a young, bright, devoted white female as For those who are interested in reading my original paper, it is now much as the guy to my right wants to be identified as a middle-aged, posted on the WRPA Web site at www.wrpatoday.org. 12 WRPA Today
  • WRPA News 2008 ANNuAL REPORT Washington Recreation & Park Association Building a Stronger WRPA Statement from the Treasurer, Tara Mizell, CPRP The newly established Finance Committee took a fresh look at our finances, realized there was room for improvement and chose to focus on the following priorities. Having confidence in our financial review is a Board priority. The committee Our biggest financial challenge will be to grow our reserve fund to the desired solicited request for proposals for financial review services from local providers goal of $75,000 (15 percent) of our operating budget. The finance committee and opted to remain with Strader Hallet & Co., P.S. The proposal process reviewed our reserve policy, and the Board formally renewed our commitment demonstrated Strader Hallet’s services were competitively priced and affirmed to achieve this goal by updating the policy at the September 2008 Board the local integrity of the company. Based on this information and their past meeting. We are 20 percent of the way there! two-year performance working with WRPA, the committee chose to renew their contract. In the year ahead, the Finance Committee will review and update each and every finance policy and work to be creative about how fast we can reach To better align our program planning, Board training and fiscal year, the our reserve account goals, which we believe is one of the highest priorities in committee adjusted the annual budget process calendar to better align with protecting and safeguarding our association. WRPA strategic planning. This adjustment will help the Board work through the budget in advance of the Board transition process. The WRPA budget will WRPA Finance Committee now be approved in March annually for the fiscal year July through June. • Bob Vaux – Vice President • John Keates – Past Treasurer In order to have a true reserve, WRPA needed to separate our reserves • Karl Harris – Secretary/Treasurer from our operating fund. We established a comfortable operating fund • Tara Mizell – Treasurer balance at $45,000 for the year and in October 2008 deposited the excess • Jennifer Schroder – Past President funds, which totaled $16,000. • Jessi Richardson – Admin Section Chair • At Large – Daryl Faber • At Large – Pete Mayer History Year Members Budget Conference Location 2009 TBA $503,334.00 Spokane 1977 574 $32,065.00 Spokane 2008 1,463 $494,756.00 Kennewick 1976 575 $25,500.00 Pasco 2007 1,530 $552,224.00 Semiahmoo 1975 591 $18,140.00 Vancouver 2006 1,660 $439,292.00 Vancouver (with ORPA) 1974 565 $15,675.00 Olympia 2005 1,162 $587,835.00 Chelan 1973 431 $12,600.00 Orcas Island – Rosario 2004 1,102 $594,374.00 Spokane – Davenport 1972 505 $9,135.00 Yakima 2003 1,086 $421,120.00 Skamania 1971 592 $8,268.00 Bellevue 2002 1,358 $318,741.00 Wenatchee 1970 279 $6,088.00 Pasco 2001 unavailable $293,811.00 Ocean Shores 1969 190 $5,744.15 Bellingham 2000 1,091 $281,163.00 Yakima 1968 262 $7,142.25 Seattle (with NRA) 1999 1,065 $290,690.00 Semiahmoo 1967 263 $5,685.00 Olympia 1998 1,080 $256,218.00 Pasco 1966 313 $2,327.50 Spokane 1997 1,075 $236,072.00 Tacoma 1965 239 $2,825.00 Ellensburg 1996 1,016 $224,095.00 Spokane 1964 221 $1,630.00 Tacoma 1995 1,095 $195,378.00 Vancouver 1963 234 $1,565.00 Vancouver 1994 1,014 $174,597.00 Wenatchee 1962 170 $1,709.49 Yakima 1993 1,077 $176,595.00 Olympia 1961 130 $1,612.00 Kennewick 1992 1,173 $176,795.00 Tacoma 1960 97 $1,500.00 Longview 1991 1,150 $154,110.00 Spokane 1959 146 $1,517.61 Olympia 1990 1,025 $141,010.00 Bellevue 1958 150 $1,048.75 Wenatchee 1989 1,050 $124,945.00 Pasco 1957 83 $1,013.00 Spokane 1988 990 $106,170.00 Bellingham 1956 92 $940.83 Seattle 1987 920 $96,860.00 Spokane 1955 53 $760.75 Yakima 1986 975 $96,500.00 Tacoma 1954 50 $233.13 Seattle 1985 1,050 $96,375.00 Vancouver 1953 44 unavailable Spokane 1984 1,004 $97,700.00 Everett 1952 60 $320.39 Seattle (with NRA) 1983 775 $99,686.00 Pasco 1951 51 unavailable Seattle 1982 750 $68,925.00 Bellevue 1950 60 unavailable Spokane (with WAHPER) 1981 727 $47,845.00 Vancouver 1949 30 $10.76 Yakima 1980 704 $44,084.00 Yakima 1948 30 $40.44 Bellingham (with WAHPER) 1979 672 $43,060.00 Bellingham 1947 31 $29.00 none 1978 595 $29,170.00 Seattle
  • WRPA News Finances For Year-End June 2008 Cash Receipts Actual % Budgeted Cash Disbursement Actual % Budgeted Conferences $177,765.00 38% $187,136.00 Conferences $95,996.00 22% $95,835.00 Dues $163,217.00 35% $161,280.00 Section $78,704.00 18% $96,441.00 Section $116.252.00 25% $135,490.00 Administrative Services $205,813.00 48% $243,900.00 Fund Development $4,181.00 1% $2,500.00 Member Services $21,017.00 5% $21,390.00 Administrative Services $541.00 0% $600.00 Public Affairs $29,331.00 7% $36,190.00 Member Services $4,117.00 1% $6,750.00 Total Cash Receipts $466,073.00 $493,756.00 Total Cash Receipts $430,861.00 $493,756.00 Cash and cash equivalents as of June 30, 2008: $60,556 14 WRPA Today
  • WRPA News November 2008 The membership charts shown here capture the most recent 18 months of membership reports. WRPA experienced a leap of nearly 500 memberships between 2005 and 2006 due to the energy created by the NRPA Congress hosted in Seattle in October 2006. This brought us to a record high of more than 1,600. You will notice, in late 2007, we released all those who did not continue membership and have since hovered near 1,450. In late 2008, we again purged our membership and experienced a drop of about 50 members and again are on a slow upward climb. During the past 18 months, our commercial memberships have grown 30 percent to a record high of 66; professional memberships grew 13 percent to 768. The WRPA Endowment Fund Thank you to the following contributors who have donated directly to the endowment fund January 1, 2007-June 2008: Ms. Brenda L. Brown Bernard R. Hayes Maxwell Ramsey Lynn Cheeney John D. Loeser, MD Jennifer and Gary Schroder Michael J. Dobb Yael Mesa United Way of King County Gary A. Feroglia Mrs. Evelyn Odegaard Sharon M. Wortman Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Haslam Dennis Ohlde Thank you also to those who participated in the WRPA Golf Tournament and the Silent Auction at our Annual Conference & Trade Show. Both of those events directly benefit the WRPA Endowment Fund, and your support is so appreciated. WRPA Today 15
  • WRPA News Washington Recreation & Park Association LEgISLATIvE PLATfORM 2009 WRPA Legislative Committee Nancy Davis, MPD Tacoma Jessi Richardson, City of Sammamish Tim Gallagher, City of Seattle Jenny Schroder, City of Kirkland Terry Higashiyama, City of Renton Ray Towry, City of Ephrata Kathy Kravit-Smith, Pierce County Bob Vaux, Skagit County Craig Larsen, City of Redmond Committee Co-Chairs Arvilla Ohlde, Emeritus Shelley Marelli, City of Bellevue Larry Otos, City of Mount Vernon John Keates, Mason County The Washington Recreation & Park Association’s WRPA Priority Legislative Issues mission is to provide resources for the public and our members Real Estate Excise Tax The Association supports local-option legislation allowing cities and who create community through people, parks and programs. counties to use up to 25 percent of the revenue from the two local one-quarter-percent Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) collections to be Established in 1947, the Washington Recreation & Park Association used for maintenance and operations of parks and recreational facilities (WRPA) is a nonprofit professional and citizen member organization — provided these were acquired or developed with the REET. serving more than 1,450 members, dedicated to enhancing and promoting parks, recreation, open space, arts and leisure pursuits in Washington Wildlife Recreation Program (WWRP) the state of Washington. The Association supports the 2009 request by the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO), the Washington Wildlife and Recreation The Association plays a vital role in promoting and advocating public Council (WWRC), WRPA and others to preserve a $100 million support for parks and recreation and increasing awareness of the necessity 2009-11 Capital Budget funding level for the Washington Wildlife and to preserve enhance and utilize leisure resources for a balanced lifestyle. Recreation Program (WWRP) Grant program. For the 2009 Legislative Session, the WRPA legislative agenda will be The Association Supports/Monitors based on the following principles: State Issues • Parks are about helping build and sustain healthy communities, • Creating an appointed seat on the Recreation and Conservation especially important at a time when health care costs and obesity Funding Board for a WRPA representative. rates continue to rise. • Monitoring and advocating for legislation that would positively • Parks are about open spaces and recreation inside of growing effect Metropolitan Park Districts in the state of Washington communities, especially important with increasing population • Supporting the full use of fuel tax revenue derived from marine and densities, and state policy goals associated with achieving climate off-road vehicles for the development and enhancement of support change, the cleanup and restoration of the Puget Sound and livable facilities for these uses. and walkable communities. • Supporting Health Department and Healthy Communities Initiatives • Parks are about connecting communities through trails and • Support for the Nutrition & Physical Activity Policy Leadership greenways, especially important at a time when population growth Group (NPA-PLG) puts more pressure on our natural resources, and scarce transportation • Support for the Washington State Nutrition and Physical dollars and ever-rising gas prices are inducing more people to walk Activity Plan and bike as an alternative to the automobile. • Support for the Washington Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity • Parks are inducers of and incentives for economic development, • Support for legislative initiatives that enhance specialized and urban plazas, waterfront parks, greenways, trail connections and the therapeutic recreation. like are central to tourism. • Support for legislative initiatives aimed at benefiting seniors and older adults. 16 WRPA Today
  • WRPA News • Support for legislation benefiting statewide human services networks. Federal Issues • Support for legislation benefiting the arts, culture, tourism and heritage. Support for the National Recreation and Park Association Legislative • Support for legislation benefiting before- and after-school programs Platforms, including: – After School Alliance. • Opposing program cuts to the Rivers, Trails and Conservation • Support for continued funding of parks and recreation, natural Assistance program; resource, park protection, forestry and related curriculum at State • Keeping program funding in the reauthorization of SAFETEA-LU colleges and universities. consistent with current program funding levels; • Support for sustained and increased funding for the Community • Monitoring the U.S. Department of Transportation’s rule-making Development Block Grant (CDBG) programs. standards on Section 4(f); • Support for legislation supporting the Puget Sound cleanup. • Opposing any plan to terminate LWCF state assistance; • Support for Community Trade and Economic Development • Encouraging Congress to adopt a new national action agenda for (CTED) funding. urban parks and recreation; • Opposition to legislation that would adversely impact funding and • Opposing cuts to the Community Development Block Grant program; flexibility for parks and recreation programs, or result in mandates • Providing $65 million in appropriations for CDC Department of that impose additional cost and resource pressures on parks and Nutrition and Physical Activity to expand anti-obesity programming recreation officials. to all 50 states; • Opposition to “gender equity” legislation if, like the 2008 version, • Passing the Play Every Day Act of 2007; it imposes extensive new reporting mandates on local parks • Expanding federal support for youth sports opportunities; departments without providing a positive way to address equal-access • Encouraging federal support for therapeutic recreation options; issues with playing fields and recreation programs. For 2009, WRPA • Increasing federal resources to assist at-risk youth; is interested in working on the notion of a model policy to promote • Passing the Urban and Rural Diseases Prevention and Health equal access for all races and genders to local play fields and to local Promotion Act; and parks and recreation programs. • Securing federal support for child-care programs and after-school • Monitoring legislation related to growth management and land activities, including the Child Care and Development Block Grant. use that has potential to impact open space and parks. If a growth management bill is proposed that addresses GMA plan elements, WRPA will advocate for the addition of parks and recreation as a required element in local comprehensive plans.
  • WRPA News Technology On December 3, 2008, WrPa launched a New Web Site! www.wrpatoday.org WRPA is strong on technology. WRPA is proud to announce the launch of the new WRPA Web site. After months of design and development, the Public Relations Committee is pleased to be able to accommodate most of the functions desired by the membership. With the exception of online membership renewals (due to complexities), the site has achieved this through a content management system hosted by DotNetNuke technology. The new look raised our professional profile and includes interactive forums for members to communicate and share resources and provides members access to an online membership directory. What you should know about the new site: The public will continue to have a broad access to our site, including the WRPA site design and function. Let us know what you like, or what’s job postings, trainings and calendars, legislative materials and everything lacking. All feedback is appreciated and will be shared with the Public under the “Discover WRPA” tab. Relations Committee for future site development. Also, check out what’s happening in your interest area — we’ve set up networks for Password-Protected Areas all our sections, established subgroups and some special committees. If The first step to accessing the password-protected areas is to log another network is needed, let the Public Relations Committee know, on and create a password. In December, all current members and we’ll add it to our site. were e-mailed instructions on how to do this. If you are a new member, our automated system will automatically send you an Online Membership Directory (Members Only) e-mail with your password and login instructions. Our database Search for members by name, agency or skill set. You will have the ability synchronizes with the Web site on the fly so that managing the to edit your profile, update your e-mail address or add a skill set. protected areas is low-maintenance. The areas that are currently protected for members only are the online membership directory Join Online (Public) and the forums. It should be easy to join WRPA. This new feature enables potential members the ability to join 24/7. Forums (Members Only) WRPA Forums feed our need to communicate online. They consist of Public Relations Committee both networking groups and discussion topics. We invite you to test Chair: Casey Stanley, Scott River, Sara Stratton, Colin Walker, Charles out the discussion topic area by providing your thoughts on the new Sablan, Jennifer Gray, Sarah Olsen GoToMeeting – or “GoTo” for Short… Proves to be the essential technology that WRPA can no longer live without… “GoTo” made easy… site, and you’re connected! If you are a first-time user of GoToMeeting, you will be prompted to download the free software, much like iTunes. Members … Connect to committee and section meetings while at the comfort of your desk. WRPA leadership sets up the meetings using Early this year, WRPA will provide special training opportunities to further GoToMeeting and posts the phone and Internet details on the WRPA acclimate our leadership and our members to the GoToMeeting technology. site. You simply phone in and point your computer to the specified Web If you are time-challenged, this is a tool you cannot live without.
  • WRPA News SPOTLIghT PROfESSIONAL ...in Parks and Recreation Tara Mizell, CPRP Describe the scope of your position in What were some of your first jobs, and What has been your biggest parks and recreation: what did you learn from them? professional challenge? Serving as the Parks and Recreation Services My very first job was working at a bank. Back My biggest professional challenge was when Manager for the City of Marysville Parks and in the “old days,” every account had a file, and Initiative 695 passed, and suddenly, our staff Recreation Department, my position offers a great each day, the bank processed the checks. I went had 90 minutes to cut our budget by $100,000. variety of duties. I have the privilege of working after school and filed people’s checks into their We had spent the past several years building up directly with our coordinators, who supervise accounts. It was a great experience because I our programs and establishing ourselves and our recreation and athletic events, as well as our senior learned I had to stay in school to make sure reputation as a solid provider of excellent service center manager. It is important to me to maintain my “real” job had variety and the chance to in our community. We lost employees, programs a hands-on approach to our classes and events. As help others. In college, I worked for University and special events across the board. We were asked our department has grown, so have my duties, Recreation and discovered you could get paid and to do more for less. The key has been to ensure we including more HR functions, public meetings, love what you do! Success! do the best job possible for our community while software management, risk management and, maintaining the highest level of integrity. It was a naturally, a budget. Why are you passionate about the parks hard lesson to learn that other people’s priorities and recreation field? were so vastly different than my own. How long have you been with your One of my favorite quotes is by Emerson: “To present agency? laugh often and much, to win the respect of What’s the best advice you can give to Fourteen and a half years at the City of Marysville! intelligent people and the affection of children, someone starting out in the field of parks We have a wonderful team of people and our office to earn the appreciation of honest critics and and recreation? is located in the fabulous Jennings Memorial Park! endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate It’s not too late to switch to a career in police. Our mayor and city council are very supportive of beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the Seriously, you have to love what you do. Our field our agency and believe in the importance of what world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, requires crazy schedules, odd financial challenges, we bring to the city. a garden patch … to know even one life has responding to changing political climates and breathed easier because you have lived. This is to dealing with people. That said, it also provides Background experience and have succeeded.” the greatest feeling of achievement when a park is previous careers? opened for the first time, a new program is a hit, Before coming to the City of Marysville, I worked We have the ability in our profession to impact a senior has a place they feel safe, a child makes at Bellevue Parks and Community Services as a our communities in so many ways. We can be the their first basket or a random citizen thanks you recreation coordinator and for Camp Fire USA. difference of a child staying in school, lower health for what you do every day. I always stress to new Anyone who has ever worked at a summer risk to our participants, keep a teen from making folks in our field to network. I cannot even begin camp can tell you it prepares you for everything. a bad choice, provide free or low-cost activities for to count the number of times I have picked up Parenthood, time management, adapting to new families, open doors for adults and seniors to meet the phone or e-mailed my WRPA contacts over situations, lice, teambuilding, creative cooking their neighbors, provide a safe haven from today’s the past 20-plus years. My WRPA colleagues methods and a love for noticing the beauty in turmoil and provide facilities for our participants have been there to encourage me, brainstorm, everyday life. to connect with nature and their communities. commiserate, teach me, evaluate and laugh. WRPA Today 19
  • Essential Services How Cities Use Parks for ... Economic Development 03 City Parks Forum Briefing Papers Executive Summary Atlanta: After Centennial Olympic Park Sales Tax Benefits Parks provide intrinsic environmental, was built, adjacent condominium prices rose Oakland, California: The presence of the aesthetic, and recreation benefits to our from $115 to $250 a square foot. As noted East Bay Regional Park District is estimated cities. They are also a source of positive on the Centennial Olympic Park Web site, to stimulate about $254 million annually in economic benefits. They enhance property “Thousands of people who have made the park-related purchases, of which $74 million values, increase municipal revenue, bring in move to downtown Atlanta have chosen is spent in the local East Bay economy. homebuyers and workers, and attract retirees. Centennial Olympic Park as their front yard.” www.centennialpark.com. Shopping Districts: Surveys indicate that At the bottom line, parks are a good financial prices for products in districts with trees were investment for a community. Understanding Amherst, Massachusetts: Cluster housing on average about 11 percent greater than in the economic impacts of parks can help with dedicated open space was found to appre- no-tree districts; the quality of products were decision makers better evaluate the creation ciate at an annual rate of 22 percent, compared rated 30 percent higher than in areas with no and maintenance of urban parks. to a comparable conventional subdivision’s rate sidewalk landscaping. of 19.5 percent. This translated in 1989 dollars to a difference of $17,100. Tourism-Related Benefits KEY POINT #1: Atlanta: Centennial Olympic Park has an Real property values are positively affected. KEY POINT #2: estimated 1.5 million visitors each year, Municipal revenues are increased. attending 175 public events. More than 100 years ago, Frederick Law Olmsted conducted a study of how parks Another component of the Central Park study San Antonio, Texas: Riverwalk Park, created help property values. From 1856 to 1873 he was an assessment of increased tax revenue as a for $425,000, is lined with outdoor cafes, shops, tracked the value of property immediately result of the park. The annual excess of increase bars, art galleries and hotels and has overtaken adjacent to Central Park, in order to justify in tax from the $209 million in property value the Alamo as the most popular attraction for the the $13 million spent on its creation. He was $4 million more than the increase in annual city’s $3.5-billion tourism industry. found that over the 17-year period there was a $209 million increase in the value of the debt payments for the land and improvement. property impacted by the park. As a result of building Central Park, New York KEY POINT #3: City made a profit. Affluent retirees are attracted and retained. As early as the 19th century the positive connection between parks and property values Increased property values and increased munic- “There is a new, clean growth industry in was being made. Olmsted’s analysis shows ipal revenues go hand in hand. Property tax is America today — The industry is retirement the real dollar amount impact of parks. His one of the most important revenue streams for migration” (Foreword in Longino, 1995, 7). study was not a unique situation, however. cities. By creating a positive climate for increased Several studies conducted over the last 20 property values, the tax rolls will benefit in turn. By the year 2050, according to the U.S. years reaffirm his findings, in cities across the As shown with Central Park, parks can both Census Bureau, approximately 1 in every 4 country. Below are more examples of how pay for themselves and generate extra revenue. Americans will be 65 years of age or older, proximity to a park setting is connected to In addition, tax revenues from increased retail creating an affluent group of retirees with property values. activity and tourism-related expenditures further financial benefits, including Social Security, increase municipal monies. military benefits, and pension plans. With an Chattanooga, Tennessee: In the early 1980s, average life expectancy of between 75 and 83 this city was facing rising unemployment and Property Tax Benefits years, this is a significant population group, crime, polluted air and a deteriorating quality Chattanooga: Improvements in Chattanooga both in size and affluence. of life. To lure middle-class residents back, resulted in an increase in annual combined local government, businesses and community city and county property tax revenues of To read the rest of the article, please visit: groups decided to improve the quality of life $592,000 from 1988 to 1996, an increase of http://www.planning.org/cityparks/briefingpapers/ 99 percent (Lerner and Poole, 1999). economicdevelopment.htm. by cleaning the air, acquiring open space, and creating parks and trails. As a result, property values rose more than $11 million, an increase Boulder: The presence of a greenbelt in a Boulder of 127.5 percent. neighborhood was found to add approximately $500,000 in property tax revenue annually. 20 WRPA Today
  • How to Join... Established in 1947, the Washington Recreation & Park Association is a not-for-profit professional and public interest organization that is dedicated to enhancing and promoting parks, recreation and arts pursuits in Washington state. Our mission: To provide resources for the public and our members who create community through people, parks and programs. WRPA is committed to advancing the parks and recreation field by providing opportunity for the professional growth of individuals employed in or volunteering in the parks and recreation services field. WHY WRPA? Information • Networking • Advocacy • And much more! HOW TO JOIN… Membership Year A membership year is based on a one-year period, commencing from either July 1 or January 1. Dues Structure: The membership dues for individuals are structured according to current salary and for agencies are based on operating budgets. Complete membership details and applications can be found on the WRPA Web site. WHICH MEMBERSHIP CATEGORY FITS? Individual Professional — For individuals currently employed in the field of parks, recreation and leisure services. See WRPA Web site for membership details: WWW.WRPATODAY.ORG www.wrpatoday.org *Dues based on annual salary. Associate — For individuals who live out-of-state or who are not currently employed in the field but who wish to keep informed through section affiliation and receipt of publications. Dues $51 Student — Individuals attending school and wishing to learn more about the profession through section affiliation and receipt of publications. Dues $25 Emeritus — For individuals who have retired and wish to remain involved and informed about the association. Dues $45 Agency Active Agency — Any agency that has as its primary activity the planning and delivery of recreation services or the management of park and natural resources. See WRPA Web site for membership details: www.wrpatoday.org. Dues are based on annual operating budget. Simple to Install Ready to Use Affiliate Agency — Any agency that provides recreation services as a secondary function; these include institutions, Easy to Maintain social service organizations, hospitals, nursing home, military installation and academic institutions. Dues are $162 for director Washington and Oregon State Contracts only, or $260 including your board. Don’t be deceived by imitators. Commercial There is only CXT. As a commercial member, your company supports the activities of the Washington Recreation & Park Association. We urge WRPA members to support and patronize those companies 800.696.5766 that have demonstrated commitment to our state organization. www.cxtinc.com • sales@cxtinc.com Dues $500 WRPA Today 21
  • In our efforts to promote and encourage innovation and excellence, significant contributions in the interests of parks and recreation. the Washington Recreation & Park Association has established • Professional: Awarded to a professional who has been an a series of awards to honor noteworthy contributions to our effective participant in WRPA in recognition of that individual’s communities and to parks and recreation. contribution to the field of parks and recreation. Candidates must be a resident of the state and a member of WRPA. Professional Awards acknowledge outstanding performances by individuals, while Spotlight Awards focus on projects and programs. Spotlight Awards Spotlight Awards honor public agencies for outstanding or The awards are presented at the WRPA Annual Conference Awards unique achievements: Banquet. This year, the conference will be held April 28-May 1 in • Class I – More than 35,001 population Spokane, Washington. The Awards Banquet will be the evening of • Class II – 35,000 and less population April 30. Recipients of the WRPA Spotlight Award of Excellence will be invited to give a presentation during an educational session at the Sub-Categories conference. A news release announcing all award recipients will be • Parks: projects like community or neighborhood parks, tot lots, distributed to major print, radio and TV media in the Puget Sound, playgrounds and trails. southwest, central and eastern Washington areas. Award recipients • Trails: projects like multiple- or single-use trails, greenways, will also be featured in the summer edition of WRPA Today and neighborhood connectors, safe routes to school, scenic, historic, highlighted on wrpatoday.org. Selected members of the WRPA Executive fitness and/or backcountry trails. Committee, including the WRPA executive director, will accompany • Facility: projects like community, fitness, aquatic, recreation the Distinguished Service and Young Professional Award winners to and nature centers. their respective city/county council or park Board meeting to make a • Sports Complex: projects like softball, baseball or soccer fields. special presentation. • Special use: projects like golf courses, skate parks, ice skating rinks and other recreation facilities that do not fit within the Professional Awards first four subcategories. Professional Awards recognize contributions made by professional • Best Brochure: single issues of general marketing brochures members of the Association to the betterment of parks and promoting points of interest, events, activities and facilities. recreation in the state of Washington in the following categories • Best Park or Trail Map: maps depicting comprehensive park and considering the noted criteria: and/or trail systems or maps highlighting an individual park and/ • Honor Fellow Award: the highest recognition bestowed by WRPA. or trail. • Distinguished Service Award: honors recently retired professionals • Events, Fairs and Festivals: holiday events, community for outstanding service in the field of parks and recreation. celebrations, large scale athletic or community events. • Young Professional Award: recognizes up and coming future • Youth and Adult: day camps, leagues, teen programs, senior leaders in the profession. programs, egg hunts, trips, tours and so on. Citations of Merit General Application Guidelines Citations of Merit recognize contributions made by individuals to Share the excitement of the awards by nominating an outstanding the betterment of parks and recreation in the state of Washington individual, organization, facility, media presentation or program for in the following categories: an award. The application will not take long, and the pleasure you • Legislative Award: recognizes individuals who have contributed may receive at seeing your applicant recognized by their peers will to parks and recreation through legislative action. be long-lasting and rewarding. The application forms are available • Citizen Volunteer Award: recognizes a lay citizen who has made electronically at www.wrpatoday.org. a significant impact to parks and recreation in their community or throughout the state. • Organization: Awarded to an organization that has supported park and recreation programs and projects or that has made 22 WRPA Today
  • 2008-2009 Washington Recreation & Park Association Officers Standing Committees President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Dodsworth, CPRP Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Richard Bemm, CPRP Past President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer Schroder, CPRP Conference Education Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sue Falash President-Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce Fletcher, CPRP Constitution & Bylaws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Todd Anderson Vice President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bob Vaux Higher Education Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Courtney Brown Treasurer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tara Mizell, CPRP Legislative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelley Marelli and John Keates, CPRP Secretary/Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karl Harris Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mary Faber Public Relations Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Casey Stanley District Representatives District 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Johnston Special Committees Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karen Emory Strategic Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce Fletcher, CPRP District 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michelle Larson, CPRP Financial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Keats, CPRP Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cathy Jones, CPRP Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terry Smith Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karl Harris District 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meredith Cutting Endowment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lynn Cheeney, CPRP Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vacant Silent Auction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tara Mizell, CPRP District 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James Fields Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lisa Deane Liaisons District 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Case Emeritus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Margaret McCormick, CPRP Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Caryl Morrell, CPRP WSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Don Hoch District 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer Papich, CPRP RCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kaleen Cottingham Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jera Donner AWC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Craig Larsen WACO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathy Kravit-Smith Section Chairs Board & Commissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dick Moe Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessi Richardson Habitat & Lands Coordinating Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leslie Betlach Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ray Towry NRPA Research Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete Mayer Aquatics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jenny Wilson Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .KC Gere WRPA Staff Athletic/Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cody Geddes Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brit Kramer, CPRP, CAE Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michelle Larson, CPRP Office Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelley Dahle Facility Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joanna Puthoff, CPRP Office Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jennifer Iverson Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brad Bennett Park Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Curt Brees Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gavin Lee Program Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tamara Cobb Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Millbauer Teen Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jim Westhusing Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Louise Webb WRPA is proud to be an Affiliate member of the National Recreation & Park Association. NRPA 2237 Belmont Ridge Road • Ashburn, VA 20148 703.858.0784 • www.nrpa.org Conference Dates WRPA Annual Conference 2009 Spokane, April 28-May 1 NRPA Congress 2009 Salt Lake City, October 13-17 • 2010 Minneapolis, October 26-30
  • WRPA Annual Conference & Trade Show April 28-May 1, 2009 Visit Web page for more info and to register! www.wrpatoday.org Idris Jassim Al-Oboudi has been working in In 1970, he joined Loughborough Recreation Planning Consultants as their the field of recreation for the past 26 years. He first full-time employee. When he left as managing director in 1974, LRPC is currently the manager of parks and recreation had developed into the largest consulting firm in the United Kingdom, for the city of Manhattan Beach, California. specializing in recreation and tourism, with a full-time staff of 25, which was Idris is the recipient of numerous prestigious supplemented by a number of part-time associate consultants. awards and state/national and international notoriety and acclaim. Kirby unti – Closing Speaker “The river is rolling and there is white water in our Born in Baghdad, Iraq, as a gifted child, Idris was selected to attend a future.” A good river guide will tell you to “be sure distinguished Soviet/Russian school for music and ballet. He was selected as a to position yourself before you enter the rapids.” scholarship student to study in the Soviet Union. In his youth and as a young We are living in a time of incredible change. adult, Idris was involved with premier and groundbreaking international Organizations have to rethink how they are dance, theatrical and cinema productions. positioned to deal with change. Planning has taken on a whole new twist. The future demands team Idris brings a unique multicultural worldview to his visionary, imaginative work and learning how to form new collaborative and exciting presentations. Be prepared to turn your passion into practice partnerships with an every increasing diverse culture. Kirby is a proven guide and his challenge to live, learn, love and leave a legacy. in helping organizations position themselves for the future. John L. Crompton holds the rank of distinguished Kirby has served as a pastor of St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church in Renton for professor of recreation, park and tourism sciences the past 27 years moving the church from survival mode into being an active at Texas A&M University. He received his partner in the community. Kirby has been an active player in a number of basic training in England. His undergraduate social and community service organizations, including the Salvation Army, work was in physical education and geography 40 Assets, Connection Adult Day Care, Congregations for the Homeless, at Loughborough College. After teaching high serving as a past president of Renton Rotary, the Renton Community school for a year, he attended the University of Foundation and the Emergency Feeding Program, just to name a few. When Illinois, where he completed a master’s degree Kirby is not involved in serving his community, you will find him and his in recreation and park administration in 1968. In 1970, he was awarded wife, Kim, on board their pocket trawler enjoying the Northwest’s waters. another master’s degree from Loughborough University of Technology, majoring in business administration. Washington Recreation & Park Association PRSRT STD 4405 7th Avenue SE, Suite 202 US POSTAGE Lacey, WA 98503 PAID PONTIAC, IL PERMIT NO. 592